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Executive Order

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NEWS
January 3, 2013
The recent column by two law school professors urging President Barack Obama to "bypass Congress" by making law through executive orders is truly alarming ("Bypass Congress," Dec. 27). The Revolutionary War was fought for our freedom from the King of England who made arbitrary laws with no accountability, no restraints, no constitution. The system of checks and balances with three independent branches of government was designed to protect us from a president who would envision himself as a king who can do no wrong, who can by the "stroke of a pen" as the law professors say, make law according to his own personal whims.
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NEWS
By Charles Cadwell and Mark Goldberg | October 6, 2014
Climate change has been in the news a lot lately. The United Nations held a Climate Change Summit, which was attended by more than 100 heads of state. Hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets of New York for a "People's Climate March," the biggest such event ever. But there was a third very important climate-related development that received much less attention than it warranted: President Barack Obama issued a new executive order that may prove to be a turning point for efforts to advance climate preparedness around the world and for U.S. foreign aid planning.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2013
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski is calling on the Obama administration to prohibit federal contractors from retaliating against employees who discuss salaries -- a new twist on a key provision of the pay equality legislation the Maryland Democrat has sought for years. In a letter to the White House on Tuesday, Mikulski argued that President Obama should sign an executive order baring contractors from firing employees who disclose their own pay or inquire about another employee's salary.
NEWS
By Matthew Wellington and Robert S. Lawrence | October 1, 2014
Science tells us that the overuse of antibiotics is leading to "super bugs," bacteria that are increasingly difficult if not impossible to kill with antibiotics. The biggest users — and arguably abusers — of antibiotics are large-scale industrial farms. More than 70 percent of antibiotics are used on livestock and poultry, and at many facilities, antibiotics are fed to animals that aren't sick. This enables the animals to grow faster and lets them stay healthy despite cramped, confined quarters where bacteria abound.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | November 29, 2012
In the latest back and forth over the degree to which Harford County government will have a measure of authority over the local volunteer fire and ambulance service, a good deal has been made over the words "coordination, command, control and the oversight. " Such is the wording of an executive order issued earlier this month under which the county government would gain oversight responsibility for what to date have been essentially a conglomeration of a dozen private clubs that provide a vital public service.
NEWS
December 26, 1996
DID GOV. Parris N. Glendening have the power to grant unions collective bargaining? That is the crux of a lawsuit filed by prominent Maryland business groups seeking to nullify the governor's executive order as a flagrant usurpation of legislative authority. They cite an impressive array of 39 prior court rulings, attorney general opinions and legislative history to prove their case.In May, we termed the governor's executive order "bad for state government, bad for taxpayers and bad for other state-employee unions" beyond the favored American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees that heartily supported Mr. Glendening's campaign for governor.
NEWS
May 21, 1996
GOV. PARRIS GLENDENING is mulling over a novel way to deal with the state legislature: If lawmakers pass something he doesn't like, he can simply issue decrees to countermand the General Assembly's wishes. And if the legislature refuses to pass something the governor wants, he can promulgate an executive order to do it anyway.Such actions skirt the edges of legality. The Department of Legislative Reference has already been asked to investigate. But that may not stop the governor from going ahead this week with an executive order to implement a form of collective bargaining for state workers -- though the General Assembly twice rejected such a move by wide margins last month.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | August 15, 2007
Without fanfare, Gov. Martin O'Malley signed executive orders this month giving collective bargaining rights to home health aides and child care workers whose pay is subsidized by the state, despite the General Assembly's rejection of those proposals. In the orders, O'Malley said home health aides -- who provide services for disabled Marylanders through the Medicaid program -- often earn low pay, with few benefits or opportunities for training. And the child care work force, he wrote, needs to be stabilized and have a collective voice.
NEWS
November 28, 2001
PRESIDENT BUSH says we are fighting terrorism to preserve our way of life -- not the least element of which is our democratic government. Trust in the laws made by our representatives prevents erosion of individual rights and domestic peace. Thus we are troubled by an executive order that could keep records of the Reagan-Bush administration out of the public domain. Those papers should be available for public inspection under a 1978 law sealing them for 12 years then making them available.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2001
When Yoshi Yamasaki-Bussey took the stage yesterday in an Anne Arundel Community College auditorium after an impressive introduction, the audience paid rapt attention. That is, until he began his remarks in Japanese. Sensing the audience's confusion, he switched to Spanish. But that didn't help much. "Now," Yamasaki-Bussey asked in English, "how do you feel being left out?" "Disconnected," one man called out. "Panicked," a woman said. "Embarrassed. Ignorant," said another The exercise was part of a keynote address Yamasaki-Bussey gave at the 20th annual conference of the Maryland Coalition for Refugees and Immigrants, a network of service providers who offer assistance to refugees and immigrants in the Baltimore-Washington area.
NEWS
August 6, 2014
It is interesting to note that Bill Clinton was impeached when he was president of the U.S. not for his improper behavior with an intern but for his constant lying to Congress - serious actions which were definitely misdemeanors ( "Impeachment-lite," July 31). "Impeachment" is an expression that is loosely being cast around in contemporary America, and apparently it is a boastful threat full of sound and fury which is becoming louder and louder as the number of executive orders from President Barack Obama is increasing.
NEWS
July 31, 2014
It's a measure of how bitter the partisan divide in Washington has become that yesterday House Republicans voted overwhelmingly to authorize Speaker John Boenher to bring a lawsuit against President Barack Obama for failing to enforce a provision of the health care law that those same lawmakers have voted to repeal scores of times. Dislike of Mr. Obama runs so deep in the House Republican caucus that members are even willing to vote against their own interests if they think it will hurt the president.
NEWS
July 8, 2014
As usual, the Obama administration is blaming President George W. Bush for its supposed inability to return the 40,000-plus unaccompanied minors from El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala. According to administration officials, a 2008 law signed by then President Bush has made it nearly impossible to deport these minors. Funny, how in just about every other "impossible" situation President Barack Obama proclaims all he needs is his pen and his phone to remedy any problems facing his imperialistic presidency.
NEWS
July 7, 2014
In Howard County, it's perfectly legal to consume the biggest, most gargantuan family-size bag of barbecue-flavored potato chips at one sitting and wash it down with a case of the most sugary soda ever made. Or, if that's not your taste, perhaps something more along the lines of the Homer Simpson diet with a thousand glazed doughnuts and a 64-ounce carton of chocolate syrup. County employees can partake of this artery-clogging, stomach-distending meal as often as they'd like. So can public school students.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 9, 2014
As President Barack Obama contemplates November's congressional elections, the odds are they may produce Republican majorities in both the House and Senate. That would likely mean more of the same legislative frustration that has met his presidency to date. Forewarned by his first term, the president during his second has been relying more on his executive powers to advance his own key objectives. He has told ranking White House aides to explore ways to move parts of his own agenda without recourse to Congress.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
With lawmakers still far apart on how to overhaul Maryland's bail system, legislative leaders and the O'Malley administration have cobbled together a short-term fix that involves an executive order and recruiting private attorneys for little or no pay to represent poor defendants. At the direction of legislative leaders, a joint House and Senate committee has set aside $10 million in the state budget to address a ruling by Maryland's highest court that the current bail system is unconstitutional because it fails to provide lawyers early enough in the process.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | February 6, 2013
Baltimore city government employees are now able to devote up to two work hours per week to helping third-grade students hone their reading skills, the mayor's office announced this month. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake signed the executive order on Feb. 1, according to a release, that would allow full-time employees to volunteer in the Baltimore city school system to provide one-on-one tutoring to students struggling with reading--a cause the mayor has taken up as part of her "Third Grade Reads Initiative.
NEWS
By Charles Cadwell and Mark Goldberg | October 6, 2014
Climate change has been in the news a lot lately. The United Nations held a Climate Change Summit, which was attended by more than 100 heads of state. Hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets of New York for a "People's Climate March," the biggest such event ever. But there was a third very important climate-related development that received much less attention than it warranted: President Barack Obama issued a new executive order that may prove to be a turning point for efforts to advance climate preparedness around the world and for U.S. foreign aid planning.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
With lawmakers still far apart on how to overhaul Maryland's bail system, legislative leaders and the O'Malley administration have cobbled together a short-term fix that involves an executive order and recruiting private attorneys for little or no pay to represent poor defendants. At the direction of legislative leaders, a joint House and Senate committee has set aside $10 million in the state budget to address a ruling by Maryland's highest court that the current bail system is unconstitutional because it fails to provide lawyers early enough in the process.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2014
More than half of the members of Maryland's congressional delegation signed a letter dated March 18 to President Barack Obama asking him to issue an executive order to prohibit federal contractors from discriminating against LGBT workers. Sens. Barbara Mikulski and Ben Cardin and U.S. Reps. Steny Hoyer, John Sarbanes, John Delaney and Chris Van Hollen were among the 195 Democrats to urge Obama to issue protections for LGBT employees. "This executive order would provide LGBT people with another avenue in the federal government they could turn to if they were the victim of employment discrimination by a federal contractor," the letter, which was signed by 47 senators and 148 members of the House, reads.
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