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By Molly Dunham and Molly Dunham,Evening Sun Staff | November 20, 1990
Only five freshmen signed by the Maryland football team for the 1990-91 school year did not meet the university's regular admission standards. That's the football team's lowest number of "exceptions to admissions" in the last decade, although the number could go up again for the 1991-92 recruiting class."
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NEWS
By Ned Holstein | October 8, 2014
A little-noticed research revolution confirms that our family courts are damaging the health of our children on a daily basis. In 2014, three separate and independent groups of experts reviewed decades of child development research. They found that after parents separate or divorce, children do much better with shared parenting - joint custody - on multiple measures of wellbeing than with single parenting. Yet in more than eight out of 10 custody cases today, one parent (usually the mother)
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NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1996
Months after Howard County's strict new anti-smoking law took effect, local bar and restaurant owners have discovered legal exceptions -- blessed by the county's Office of Law -- that let some diners continue to smoke.The most common tactic is for restaurants to enclose several dining tables alongside a bar in a separately ventilated bar room -- about the only place restaurant patrons still can legally smoke in Howard.But Bennigan's restaurant in Columbia's Town Center has taken that logic a step further, enclosing 14 tables in a "bar area" that includes no bar."
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 31, 2014
Sometimes you read a sentence and you think to yourself: only here, only us. Here's one such sentence. "A 9-year-old girl from New Jersey accidentally shot and killed her instructor with an Uzi submachine gun while he stood to her left side, trying to guide her. " That's from a New York Times account of the death of 39-year-old Charles Vacca, who worked for the Last Stop shooting range in White Hills, Ariz. He died Monday when his...
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | December 15, 1992
Lack of parking was the only concern voiced at last night's Mount Airy public hearing on proposed zoning changes to allow housing for senior citizens in the town.Council members proposed raising the 1.5-space-per-unit minimum to two spaces per unit after Town Council President Delaine Hobbs suggested that many of the residents might have two cars or require parking spaces for regular visitors."You have to count on every unit needing that second vehicle," Mr. Hobbs said.Amid audience laughter, Mr. Hobbs said the ordinance did not dTC allow for the possibility of "live-ins."
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2002
Facing a $400 million shortfall in the current year's budget, Maryland budget officials yesterday tightened the 11-month-old state government hiring freeze. "Due to the continuing effects of the weak national economy on state revenues, it is necessary to restrict the flexibility that has been provided under the statewide hiring freeze," budget chief T. Eloise Foster wrote in a memo to all Cabinet secretaries and agency heads yesterday. "The [availability] of exceptions to the statewide hiring freeze is curtailed and the authority of certain agency heads to approve hiring exceptions is rescinded," Foster wrote.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 25, 1997
Baltimore Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier's decision to choose the officers he wants to rotate through various jobs is not unfair to labor, a hearing commissioner has ruled.A federal hearing examiner, Jerome H. Ross, decided in a 10-page ruling that an agreement signed by department and union officials clearly gives Frazier the "authority to specify assignments."The union was upset that Frazier made exceptions to his policy of rotating every officer to a new assignment every four years.
NEWS
August 2, 2012
Carol Carr's diagnosis of colorectal cancer at age 44 ("Colon cancer rises for young," July 30) underscores the point that even though current national guidelines for average risk individuals call for colon screening to start at age 50, there are important exceptions. Anyone experiencing symptoms like Ms. Carr's should talk to a gastroenterologist. African-Americans fall into a high-risk category and are another exception to the rule to start screening at age 50. The American College of Gastroenterology in its official screening guidelines recommends that African-Americans should start younger - at age 45 - because they face a higher incidence of colorectal cancer generally, have more cancers in the right side of the colon, as well as potentially more aggressive tumors.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | October 14, 1990
The Sun Magazine's photo contest is one of the most popular features we have -- people start calling us months before we announce it each year to find out when we're going to run the rules. Its appeal, I think, is that it's unabashedly a contest for amateurs. In fact, maybe we should do what Kodak does with its international competition: Call it a snapshot contest. Having said that, I should add that I'm always surprised at the high quality of the entries -- many of them are much more artistic than the word "snapshot" implies.
NEWS
December 5, 2000
BROADCASTS OF the county commissioners' meetings will never crack the Nielsen ratings, but they may crack the cloaked nature of some of their proceedings. We say may because their dual executive-legislative role leaves the commissioners more escape outlets than a prairie dog town. The legal exceptions -- excuses -- offered for the commissioners' habitual executive sessions and closed meetings prompted a recent inquiry by the state's Open Meetings Compliance Board. There's no chance of remedy from that panel, whose opinions are purely advisory and without legal sanctions.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
By the time Salisbury goalie Ashton Wheatley had finished her junior year, she already had more hardware in her trophy case than most players could hope to collect in a career. Her stellar performance in leading the Sea Gulls to the Division III national championship last May earned tournament Most Valuable Player honors, the perfect complement to her second straight Division III Goalkeeper of the Year award. As they aim to repeat as champs, the No. 2 Sea Gulls are 19-1 heading into Saturday's home game vs. undefeated Augustana (Ill.)
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 15, 2014
Fair warning: this book will make you angry. "The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap," by Matt Taibbi, is a volume of stories. Like the Vietnamese refugee and rape victim in San Diego who applied for public assistance, only to be visited by a "welfare inspector" who barged into her home and began yelling that he would take her children away if he found she was lying about being destitute and not having a man. All this as he's rummaging through her belongings.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
Democratic attorney general candidate Jon S. Cardin apparently thought he had a winning argument Saturday when he boasted to the Western Maryland Democratic Summit in Hagerstown that he was the only candidate in the three-way primary race with a 97 percent pro-environment score over his 12-year legislative career from the League of Conservation Voters. That claim is true. A check of the league's web site confirmed that the Baltimore County delegate had earned that score. After hearing about the claim, one of Cardin's opponents in the June 24 primary, Sen. Brian E. Frosh of Montgomery County, conceded that Cardin is indeed the only candidate in the race with a 97 percent score.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2014
The pending arrival of new Ravens safety Darian Stewart comes with a scouting report. Stewart has built a reputation as a tough guy with a lot of pop and as a tackler who excels in run support. However, Stewart isn't known for making a ton of plays in pass coverage despite his above-average speed. "Good safety, good player," said retired former St. Louis Rams defensive tackle D'Marco Farr, an analyst for the organization's broadcasting team. "Good, smart, instinctive guy, underrated hitter.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 13, 2014
The Havre de Grace Activity Center, located at 351 Lewis Lane, will be closed to most activities on Friday, March 14, because of ongoing heating system repairs, Harford County government said. The exception will be previously made appointments for tax preparation help. The center has been closed most of this week. A contractor installing fiber optic cable ruptured a coolant line to the center's geothermal hearing and cooling system. There have been complications in making repairs, a county spokesperson said Wednesday.
NEWS
January 30, 2014
I appreciated Dan Rodricks recent column about American "exceptionalism" ( "Expecting the horrible is the American way," Jan. 25). Some years ago when I conducted student travel-study semesters in various European countries with, among other things, well-functioning transportation systems, my students had no problem recognizing that some things were indeed better in Europe. After our return I asked them about this, and their answer was: "The U.S. is still the best country.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 1997
My 6-year-old son has been enrolled in a karate class for almost a year.Can karate be harmful to his physical development?How about soccer, gymnastics and other organized athletic activities?With a few exceptions -- boxing and weightlifting come immediately to mind -- it is perfectly safe for a young child to participate in sports, provided a few guidelines are followed:The sport should be fun for the child and the motivation should come from the child, rather than a parent or coach.The sport should not take all the child's free time.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | March 12, 1995
Far be it from me to let anything so trivial as partisan politics or the fate of the nation ooze into these sacrosanct columns. But Newton Leroy Gingrich has put his name (or part of it), if not much of his hand, to a book, and books are my game.This is not the project for which a $4.5 million advance was contracted by Rupert Murdoch's empire and then turned back, under heat and pressure - a work intended to propound political visions.In stark contrast, the book in question today is said to have been written for a trifling $15,000 advance, which purportedly went to Mr. Gingrich, who is said to have been responsible for the ideas and oversight but not for the bulk of the actual prose, which was crafted by William R. Forstchen.
NEWS
December 5, 2013
Americans may fear for the demise of American "exceptionalism," but is that exceptionalism really American ( "America the mediocre," Nov. 3)? After all, aren't most exceptional Americans actually from somewhere else? Didn't virtually all Americans come from another country? As long as exceptional people want to come to America we will continue to have more than our share of them - and remain an exceptional nation. David Liddle - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
December 3, 2013
A report this week that American students are lagging behind their top international peers in math, reading and science should give pause to those who argue that the nation's school reform efforts are going too far and too fast. In fact, they suggest just the opposite: The, at best, middling scores of American 15-year-olds not only challenge the notion of American "exceptionalism," they also threaten over time to erode the educational foundations of the world's largest economy and its global political and military influence.
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