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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
The Baltimore Development Corp. board this morning agreed to enter into an exclusive negotiating agreement with the owner of the former Examiner building, 400 E. Pratt St., so that an addition to the building can be built on city-owned land. The Peter D. Leibowits Co. wants to build a 22,600 square foot, glass-fronted retail space on land along East Pratt and Commerce streets, according to BDC records. The plan, which the developer hopes will be leased to a national retail chain or restaurant, is expected to make the Pratt Street sidewalk more pedestrian friendly, BDC Economic Development Officer Kerry DeVilbiss told the board.
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NEWS
By Doug Donovan and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
The July death of a 10-year-old disabled foster child has been ruled a homicide — six years after the Baltimore city boy's mother was accused of shaking him into a coma-like state, Baltimore police announced Monday. Damaud Martin died July 2 at an Anne Arundel County group home that state regulators were in the process of closing down for multiple problems. State health officials are investigating whether Damaud received adequate care while living at the home, which was run by a company called LifeLine, but have cautioned against drawing any premature conclusions.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
The state medical examiner's office says the autopsy of Tyrone West, who died last month in police custody after a traffic stop, is pending with no timetable.  Protesters, including West's family, have been demanding that prosecutors and police reveal West's cause of death. But Bruce Goldfarb, a spokesman for the state medical examiner, says they don't have it yet. "In some cases, such as with a hanging or shooting, the mechanism causing a death may be obvious," Goldfarb said.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
BOSTON -- Stressing that it was more precautionary than alarming, the Orioles sent starting shortstop J.J. Hardy back to Baltimore on Monday night to see a team doctor about his balky back. Hardy missed the Orioles' final two games against the Tampa Bay Rays at Tropicana Field over the weekend, and he will not return for the remainder of the road trip - marking at least a five-game absence. Even if he could play Wednesday in the series finale against the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park, the Orioles didn't like the idea of him having to take another round airplane trip so quickly.
NEWS
June 30, 2001
Force, asphyxiation killed woman, examiner says A 70-year-old Dundalk woman found June 23 lying dead in the courtyard of her apartment building died of blunt force injury and asphyxiation, the state medical examiner's office's ruled yesterday. Bill Toohey, a Baltimore County police spokesman, said her death is being investigated as a homicide. Toohey would not say if police have suspects or if they believe the attack was random or targeted. Edwina Delores Arnett, a resident of the Willow Spring Apartments in the 2100 block of Dundalk Ave., was discovered by police officers responding to a possible cardiac arrest call.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield | November 23, 1993
Doctors in the state medical examiner's officer determined Friday that the death of Antoine Greene, 17, a Dunbar High basketball player, was caused by diabetic ketoacidosis, a disturbance of the metabolism of glucose in his body.Greene, a senior, collapsed in his home Nov. 14 after being "lethargic" all day and asking for an ambulance, according to police and fire officials who received a 911 call at approximately 4:22 p.m.Paramedics at the scene determined Greene had gone into cardiac arrest.
NEWS
March 25, 1999
A state medical examiner ruled yesterday that 20-year-old Michael E. DePinto, whose mother found his body at their Westminster home eight days ago, died of narcotics intoxication complicated by bronchial pneumonia.Until results from additional toxicology tests are completed, the medical examiner will not be able to tell authorities what drug or combination of drugs might have been involved, said Capt. Dean Brewer, a spokesman for Westminster Police Department.The investigation is continuing, he said.
NEWS
October 21, 2005
Mary A. Stepney, a retired Social Security Administration worker who enjoyed entertaining family and friends, died of lung cancer Sunday at Maryland General Hospital. She was 58. She was born Mary A. Williams in Tacoma, Wash., and was raised in West Baltimore. She was a 1965 graduate of Douglass High School and attended the Community College of Baltimore. She began working at SSA in 1973 as a benefits examiner technician and worked at Woodlawn until 2003, when she retired on a medical disability.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | January 30, 2009
This town isn't big enough for two Michael Phelpses. Baltimore still has its Olympic superstar, but it is losing the newspaper with the like-named CEO. And it is a loss. Of local color. (We'll miss The Baltimore Examiner's "Bludgeoned!" "INSANE?" and other punchy New York Post-style headlines.) Of social status. (I never felt richer than when The Examiner, supposedly delivered only to the most affluent homes in Baltimore, made its first, surprise appearance on my humble Southwest Baltimore driveway.
BUSINESS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | November 3, 2006
Saying he cannot get The Examiner to stop throwing unwanted papers in his driveway each morning, a Baltimore lawyer has asked the Baltimore County Circuit Court for a temporary restraining order to force an end to the deliveries. "They're trespassing, technically," said Joel L. Levin, referring to the carriers who deliver the papers in his Pikesville neighborhood. Almost a month ago, he said, he began calling the paper's circulation department to have them stopped, but they keep coming.
NEWS
By Thomas Neas, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Vacant buildings are many things: signs of decay, eyesores and dangerous. They might also hold a strong relationship to crime. According to frequently updated data provided by Open Baltimore, there is a strong correlation between vacant buildings and certain crimes, such as shootings and homicides. Common assault, a physical attack, increases from neighborhood to neighborhood as the number of vacant houses increases — a trend shared with crime in general. And it does so at a much more pronounced rate than other crimes.
HEALTH
By Charlotte Martin, For The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post. The latest post is from dietetic intern Charlotte Martin. Gone are the days when milk came only from cows. Now you can make "milk" out of just about anything, from nuts to rice, even hemp. There are several reasons why one might choose a nondairy alternative over cow's milk, most commonly because of lactose intolerance or veganism. But with so many nondairy "milks" to choose from, it can be overwhelming perusing the milk section of the supermarket.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2014
The University of Maryland, University College has a history of experimentation. With its roots in a 1920s night school, the institution expanded in the 1940s and '50s into Europe and Asia to educate military personnel. Then as the Internet flourished, it embraced online learning. Now the state university is experimenting again. This month, President Javier Miyares unveiled a proposal from a group of business leaders he assembled that would tie the university's future more closely to the private sector.
NEWS
June 11, 2014
As taken from the pages of The Aegis dated Thursday, June 11, 1964: Glue sniffing was in the rise in Harford County among people ages of 13 to 17. Dr. Henry Freimuth, a toxicologist from the office of the Chief Medical Examiner, furnished the following information relating to the habit of glue sniffing. The practice of glue sniffing is a means of obtaining a cheap high. Most sniffers fail to realize the practice could be habit-forming and may cause harmful after effects. Drowsiness, stupor and unconsciousness may follow.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 5, 2014
It probably shouldn't be a surprise. When she earns more than he earns, according to a new book on the subject, his ego and their relationship can take a hit. Author Farnoosh Torabi is a first generational Iranian-American and a personal finance journalist. When she chose to marry a man who earns less than she, her mother was not happy. She told a reporter that she felt like she was a disappointment to her family. She decided to explore the dynamics of this salary inequity and collected her findings in "When She Makes More: 10 Rules for Breadwinning Women.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Given the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, there's an extra haunting quality to "Air Heart," an inventive and absorbing aerial stage work about aviator Amelia Earhart currently at Baltimore Theatre Project. Written and performed by Mara Neimanis, the one-hour piece addresses the joy of flight, the curse of celebrity, and much more as it seeks to impart a sense of who Earhart was and what she wanted to be. Neimanis has cleverly mixed fact and fiction to create a script that rings true, right down to some made-up letters from Earhart to Eleanor Roosevelt, and she delivers the text with a good deal of nuance.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Liz F. Kay and Tricia Bishop and Liz F. Kay and,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com and liz.kay@baltsun.com | January 30, 2009
Less than three years after its debut, the Baltimore Examiner free newspaper will cease publication next month, a victim of the worst advertising climate in decades. The last issue will be on Feb. 15. The decision comes after months of unsuccessful attempts to find a buyer for the paper and failed efforts to package ads with a sister publication in Washington, Denver-based owner Clarity Media Group said yesterday. "This is very disappointing for all of us. Obviously, this is not what we envisioned when we launched the newspaper," Clarity Chief Executive Officer Ryan McKibben said in a letter sent to Examiner staff yesterday morning.
BUSINESS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2005
Local residents living in affluent neighborhoods will begin receiving a free tabloid newspaper next spring, published by a Denver corporation owned by billionaire Philip F. Anschutz. The Baltimore Examiner will be the third in a chain of free papers - the others are The Washington Examiner and The San Francisco Examiner - owned by Anschutz's Clarity Media Group, which intends to start similar periodicals in dozens of other American cities. In Baltimore, Clarity Media Group plans to deliver most of its 250,000 papers to specific ZIP codes, but also has purchased 2,000 newspaper racks to be placed around town.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
It's almost a year since federal authorities announced that Tavon White and the Black Guerrilla Family gang had corrupted the Baltimore City Detention Center from the inside out, and this week's New Yorker magazine has an expansive look at the case. Staff writer Jeffrey Toobin casts a close eye over the sexual dynamics in the jail, pointing to misogynistic ideas espoused by the BGF's founder in the 1960s, and repeated up by former Maryland gang leader Eric Brown. George Jackson, who founded the BGF in a California prison, was steeped in many of the left wing ideas popular in the 1960s, but he roundly rejected calls for women's rights and espoused polygamy as a way to care for women who would otherwise go unmarried, according to Toobin.
FEATURES
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Biologists from Maryland's Department of Natural Resources got to hold some cute bear cubs Monday. But it was more than just an opportunity to see the state's wildlife up close. DNR's Wildlife and Heritage Service used the winter check-up to "keep an eye on the size and health of Maryland's bruin population," said DNR spokeswoman Candus Thomson . Staff ventured into the woods Monday, while sows and bears were still located in their dens, Thomson said. The exercise allowed biologists "to change the batteries in radio collars worn by some sows and tag the new cubs with microchips, so they can be scanned in subsequent years without disturbing their hibernation.
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