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By John Steadman | September 27, 1993
That Wilbur "Weeb" Ewbank coached and won the two most celebrated pro football games of the last 50 years sets him apart. It's a distinction that is his alone to cherish and treasure for perpetuity.The Baltimore Colts and Ewbank beat the New York Giants, 23-17, in the first overtime the NFL ever knew in winning the 1958 championship. Then, after being fired in Baltimore, he rebounded in New York and took the Jets to a 16-7 victory over a Colts team that was a 16 1/2 -point favorite in the Jan. 12, 1969, Super Bowl.
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By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun and By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
OXFORD, Ohio - With a blinding sun and a mostly empty Yager Stadium at his back, Ravens coach John Harbaugh peered into a crowd that contained so many people he wanted to thank. To his right were his parents, wife and daughter, along with other members of his extended family. To his left were about 30 of his former teammates at Miami University (Ohio). Straight ahead were a couple of rows of football fans, many either wearing Miami red or Ravens purple. It was exactly how Harbaugh wanted to commemorate a memorable and rewarding weekend.
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By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1995
Art Donovan? A Cleveland Brown? It happened, in 1951.Donovan spent that summer in the Browns' training camp. Why Cleveland? Baltimore was between franchises in the NFL, and when the old Colts folded after the 1950 season, Donovan needed a job.He didn't make the team. The Browns, defending NFL champs, were rich in linemen. Donovan got hurt in practice. And then there was his relationship with coach Paul Brown."I don't think he liked me," Donovan says."I played three exhibition games, but never really got a chance.
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Baltimore Sun staff | January 18, 2012
Lucy Ewbank, wife of former Baltimore Colts coach Weeb Ewbank, died Monday in The Knolls of Oxford (Ohio). She was 105. Her husband died in 1998. He coached the Colts from 1954 to 1962, winning championships in 1958 and 1959. He also coached the New York Jets. He went into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1978. According to a news release from Miami University in Oxford, where her husband was an athlete and coach, Mrs. Ewbank is survived by her daughters; Luanne Spenceley, Nancy (Charles)
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By JOHN STEADMAN | April 25, 1995
They were there to be with their coach, known by the distinctive name of Weeb since the day his young baby brother began to talk and couldn't say Wilbur. He made the Pro Football Hall of Fame on the basis of transforming two of the world's worst teams into world champions and winning classic games that created an indelible imprint on the records of the sport.Wilbur "Weeb" Ewbank was in the company of four of his former Baltimore Colts, the team that won what's referred to as the greatest game ever played, the sudden-death victory over the New York Giants in 1958.
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By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1996
"If a nuclear bomb were dropped," Baltimore Colts defensive end Bubba Smith once said, "the only two things that would survive are AstroTurf and Don Shula."Shula, who stepped down yesterday as the Miami Dolphins coach and the winningest coach in NFL history, will survive, but the game may not, according to his former Colts teammates and players."It's a great loss to football," said Tom Matte, a Colts running back who played for Shula. "We'd like him to stay in it in some capacity."Shula, 66, has been defying the odds since his days with the Colts.
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By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun reporter | August 13, 2008
Word from Westminster is that this is the toughest Ravens training camp in years. Contact drills are up. Rest time is down. In "Camp Hardball," even the team's golf cart has been overworked, hauling off players hobbled by shoulder, knee and ankle injuries. What do the old Baltimore Colts say about that? Ha! "I remember one training camp when we never got water breaks," said Ordell Braase, an All-Pro defensive end who played for the Colts from 1957 through 1968. "There were no liquids on the field.
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By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1996
With so many old Colts being honored when the NFL returns to Baltimore tomorrow, it's appropriate that Al Davis will be on the scene.You probably didn't realize the Oakland Raiders owner is an old Colt.He is, at least in his own mind.According to the Raiders media guide, "Davis served on the staff of the Baltimore Colts in 1954, at age 24, concentrating on player personnel work."Davis, who rarely returns phone calls, didn't return a call this week asking him about his Baltimore days.But Raiders senior assistant Bruce Allen forwarded questions to Davis about the owner's Baltimore connection.
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By John Steadman | March 3, 1998
What began as a modest and tenuous endeavor, an amateur athletic club gathering to honor a Baltimore Colts football player, has turned into a charitable bonanza, a national spectacle, a working model that other cities have come to study and emulate. It's all in behalf of making a better world for abused children. Can there be a more tender and compelling cause?It's the Ed Block Memorial Courage Award Banquet, started by a working man, a barber named Sam Lamantia, who had a dream and made it come true.
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By JOHN STEADMAN | November 15, 1998
Most of the time, George Preas' methodical football effectiveness graded to such high professional proficiency that the quality of the performance simply became the expected. It was a given, a standard marked by excellence.This was a quiet soldier on the front line of battle whose abilities were much respected. He was a winner, functioning in the almost faceless anonymity of being an offensive right tackle.Preas, only a yard away and ready to spring out of a three-point stance, was instrumental in the 1958 world-champion Baltimore Colts prevailing in what became the game of their lives.
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By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2011
Sitting on stage alongside his aging teammates, having dinner during the Sports Legend Museum induction at Martin's West Tuesday night, 85-year-old Gino Marchetti will chew on this: "It's amazing to me that, after all these years, people are still thinking of us," Marchetti, the Baltimore Colts' Hall of Fame defensive end, said. "I always figured that I'd play football for a few years, go home to Antioch (Calif.) and work in the mill until I turned 65, then go fishing. But, God almighty, the people of Baltimore want to keep promoting us. "The fans were always great in this town.
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By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun reporter | August 13, 2008
Word from Westminster is that this is the toughest Ravens training camp in years. Contact drills are up. Rest time is down. In "Camp Hardball," even the team's golf cart has been overworked, hauling off players hobbled by shoulder, knee and ankle injuries. What do the old Baltimore Colts say about that? Ha! "I remember one training camp when we never got water breaks," said Ordell Braase, an All-Pro defensive end who played for the Colts from 1957 through 1968. "There were no liquids on the field.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | November 15, 1998
Most of the time, George Preas' methodical football effectiveness graded to such high professional proficiency that the quality of the performance simply became the expected. It was a given, a standard marked by excellence.This was a quiet soldier on the front line of battle whose abilities were much respected. He was a winner, functioning in the almost faceless anonymity of being an offensive right tackle.Preas, only a yard away and ready to spring out of a three-point stance, was instrumental in the 1958 world-champion Baltimore Colts prevailing in what became the game of their lives.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | March 3, 1998
What began as a modest and tenuous endeavor, an amateur athletic club gathering to honor a Baltimore Colts football player, has turned into a charitable bonanza, a national spectacle, a working model that other cities have come to study and emulate. It's all in behalf of making a better world for abused children. Can there be a more tender and compelling cause?It's the Ed Block Memorial Courage Award Banquet, started by a working man, a barber named Sam Lamantia, who had a dream and made it come true.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1996
With so many old Colts being honored when the NFL returns to Baltimore tomorrow, it's appropriate that Al Davis will be on the scene.You probably didn't realize the Oakland Raiders owner is an old Colt.He is, at least in his own mind.According to the Raiders media guide, "Davis served on the staff of the Baltimore Colts in 1954, at age 24, concentrating on player personnel work."Davis, who rarely returns phone calls, didn't return a call this week asking him about his Baltimore days.But Raiders senior assistant Bruce Allen forwarded questions to Davis about the owner's Baltimore connection.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1996
Art Modell was welcomed to Baltimore last night.After being besieged by autograph seekers who thanked him for bringing the NFL back to Baltimore, Modell got a standing ovation from the sellout crowd of 2,000 at the Ed Block Courage Award Foundation Dinner last night.Modell, who was criticized the past four months from coast to coast for moving the Cleveland Browns to Baltimore, seemed touched by the reception."I'm overwhelmed with the response here tonight," Modell said."If this is the enthusiasm for NFL football, what's going to happen when we win a few games?"
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Baltimore Sun staff | January 18, 2012
Lucy Ewbank, wife of former Baltimore Colts coach Weeb Ewbank, died Monday in The Knolls of Oxford (Ohio). She was 105. Her husband died in 1998. He coached the Colts from 1954 to 1962, winning championships in 1958 and 1959. He also coached the New York Jets. He went into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1978. According to a news release from Miami University in Oxford, where her husband was an athlete and coach, Mrs. Ewbank is survived by her daughters; Luanne Spenceley, Nancy (Charles)
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1996
Art Modell was welcomed to Baltimore last night.After being besieged by autograph seekers who thanked him for bringing the NFL back to Baltimore, Modell got a standing ovation from the sellout crowd of 2,000 at the Ed Block Courage Award Foundation Dinner last night.Modell, who was criticized the past four months from coast to coast for moving the Cleveland Browns to Baltimore, seemed touched by the reception."I'm overwhelmed with the response here tonight," Modell said."If this is the enthusiasm for NFL football, what's going to happen when we win a few games?"
SPORTS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1996
"If a nuclear bomb were dropped," Baltimore Colts defensive end Bubba Smith once said, "the only two things that would survive are AstroTurf and Don Shula."Shula, who stepped down yesterday as the Miami Dolphins coach and the winningest coach in NFL history, will survive, but the game may not, according to his former Colts teammates and players."It's a great loss to football," said Tom Matte, a Colts running back who played for Shula. "We'd like him to stay in it in some capacity."Shula, 66, has been defying the odds since his days with the Colts.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1995
Art Donovan? A Cleveland Brown? It happened, in 1951.Donovan spent that summer in the Browns' training camp. Why Cleveland? Baltimore was between franchises in the NFL, and when the old Colts folded after the 1950 season, Donovan needed a job.He didn't make the team. The Browns, defending NFL champs, were rich in linemen. Donovan got hurt in practice. And then there was his relationship with coach Paul Brown."I don't think he liked me," Donovan says."I played three exhibition games, but never really got a chance.
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