Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEwan Mcgregor
IN THE NEWS

Ewan Mcgregor

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 28, 2000
"Eye of the Beholder" is supposed to raise questions about obsession, voyeurism and desire in a high-tech world, but the only question it poses successfully is this: When do two perfectly appealing actors like Ewan McGregor and Ashley Judd finally spend all of their personal capital with audiences by appearing in horrible movies? McGregor has won filmgoers over in such films as "Shallow Grave," "Trainspotting" and "Little Voice." But then he blows it by lending his imprimatur to trash like "Nightwatch," "The Phantom Menace" and "Rogue Trader," a made-for-TV movie on Cinemax.
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
February 12, 2012
now playing "Big Miracle" (PG). A newsman in Alaska (John Krasinski) lands a story that could give him the big break he needs to advance his career. With Drew Barrymore, Kristen Bell and Dermot Mulroney. TownMall Cinemas (2, 4:40, 7:10 p.m.) "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close" (PG-13). Oskar (Thomas Horn), who lost his father (Tom Hanks) in the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Center, is convinced that his dad left a final message for him somewhere in New York City.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 1, 2001
"Moulin Rouge" is a boy-meets-courtesan story set in turn-of-last-century Montmartre and dressed up in psychedelic corsets. It wants to be like no other movie you've ever seen. It's more like every movie you've ever seen, only shredded and reformed into bales of Day-Glo confetti. The Australian director, Baz Luhrmann ("Strictly Ballroom" and "William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet") has a penchant for the prolonged paroxysm. When the middle-class poet hero (Ewan McGregor) is sullen or melancholy, the lights go out all over Paris.
FEATURES
By David Eckstein and Zap2it | February 10, 2012
While "The Artist" is expected to do well at the Feb. 26 Oscars, the film has some new hardware for the mantle courtesy of its four-legged cast member. Uggie won a Pawscar. The Jack Russell terrier took home the prize on Thursday (Feb. 9) for "Best Scene Stealer" at the competition put on by the American Humane Association. "Not only did Uggie steal the hearts of [the] audience, he also stole the hearts of his co-stars," the AHA says in a release. "Uggie even managed to continue stealing the spotlight when the camera person at the Golden Globes couldn't take the camera off him during the cast's acceptance speech as 'The Artist' won Best Film.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | April 25, 2008
That underrated actor Ewan McGregor recently did something even Liam Neeson couldn't do: Triumph in the Star Wars prequel trilogy. But when it comes to slick New York City genre movies, he's a jinx. He helped sink the witless Manhattan sex farce Down With Love (2003), and he couldn't inject life into the psychiatric trick mystery Stay. He does even worse in the new Gothic-Gotham suspense film Deception. This awful, glossy hybrid of The Talented Mr. Ripley and Eyes Wide Shut serves up McGregor as a shy high-powered accountant, crudely banged and boringly bespectacled despite his expensive tailoring.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | October 13, 2006
Alex Rider: Operation Stormbreaker, the adventures of a teen superspy created by British novelist Anthony Horowitz, is about as clunky as a movie gets. It lurches from scene to scene with no sense of narrative grace, gives its roster of prominent actors nothing to work with and screeches to a halt with all the grace of a sprinter whose shoelaces have been tied together. Alex Pettyfer, reportedly plucked from a gaggle of some 500 teen-heartthrob wannabes, plays Rider, a heretofore carefree high-schooler who's recruited into Britain's top-secret MI6 after the murder of his superspy uncle/guardian (Ewan McGregor, who displays more charisma during his brief time onscreen than the rest of the cast combined)
FEATURES
By Michael Wilmington and Michael Wilmington,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 12, 2004
Young Adam, an excellent film of the novel by Alexander Trocchi, is a literary adaptation that comes alive. It's a movie drama with a surface so bleak and an interior so hot with eroticism it twists your guts to watch it. Set in Glasgow in the early 1950s, it focuses on the mundane work and lively sexual career of Joe Taylor (Ewan McGregor), whose attractiveness blights the lives of those around him. Joe lives and works on a barge that runs between Glasgow and Edinburgh, run by genial boozer Les Gault (Peter Mullan)
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 21, 2005
In Stay, the director, Marc Foster, fresh from Finding Neverland, turns Manhattan into a nightmarish dreamscape and his characters into self-destructive ghosts. Ewan McGregor plays a high-powered shrink who doubles as a university psychiatrist. He's happy in his double professional life and in his private life with a once-suicidal painter (Naomi Watts) until he takes over the treatment of a haunted-looking art student (Ryan Gosling) who intends to kill himself on his 21st birthday. Soon, every aspect of the hero's existence funnels into the patient's psychic vortex.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 16, 2003
Blind ambition and blond ambition equal bland ambition in Down With Love, a thoroughly misbegotten comedy. How could the filmmakers have thought that audiences needed an homage to Doris Day, the singer-actress Pauline Kael once referred to as "the All-American middle-aged girl," and to plastic super-hits like Pillow Talk (1959) and Lover Come Back (1961), which made Day a huge star? Although Down With Love is in every sorry way the farce equivalent of Far From Heaven, there were more inadvertent laughs in that pastiche of 1950s soap operas than there are intentional laughs in this meringue of the '50s and '60s big-screen sitcoms that teamed Day with Rock Hudson.
FEATURES
By David Eckstein and Zap2it | February 10, 2012
While "The Artist" is expected to do well at the Feb. 26 Oscars, the film has some new hardware for the mantle courtesy of its four-legged cast member. Uggie won a Pawscar. The Jack Russell terrier took home the prize on Thursday (Feb. 9) for "Best Scene Stealer" at the competition put on by the American Humane Association. "Not only did Uggie steal the hearts of [the] audience, he also stole the hearts of his co-stars," the AHA says in a release. "Uggie even managed to continue stealing the spotlight when the camera person at the Golden Globes couldn't take the camera off him during the cast's acceptance speech as 'The Artist' won Best Film.
FEATURES
November 20, 2009
2012 . ( 3 STARS) $65.2 million $65.2 million 1 week Rated : PG-13 Running time : 2:38 What it's about : Director Roland Emmerich wipes out an entire planet via tsunami, earthquake, volcano and risible dialogue, and John Cusack (above), Amanda Peet and Chiwetel Ejiofor fight, valiantly, for their lives. Our take : The over-the-top effects are quite enjoyable. At least the first five or six hours of them. . A Christmas Carol ( 1 STAR)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | November 6, 2009
"The Men Who Stare at Goats," starring Jeff Bridges as an Army shaman and George Clooney as his best pupil, is a refreshingly unpredictable and fizzy comic fantasy. It tickles the fancy even when it strains credibility. It riffs off the American military's real-life exploration of unconventional intelligence-gathering and combat techniques as well as the Army's attempts to redefine itself after the bloody mess and stagnation of Vietnam. History buffs might bristle at the way the film fiddles with the actual Cold War recruitment of "psychic spies" for a project called Stargate, based in Fort Meade outside Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | April 25, 2008
That underrated actor Ewan McGregor recently did something even Liam Neeson couldn't do: Triumph in the Star Wars prequel trilogy. But when it comes to slick New York City genre movies, he's a jinx. He helped sink the witless Manhattan sex farce Down With Love (2003), and he couldn't inject life into the psychiatric trick mystery Stay. He does even worse in the new Gothic-Gotham suspense film Deception. This awful, glossy hybrid of The Talented Mr. Ripley and Eyes Wide Shut serves up McGregor as a shy high-powered accountant, crudely banged and boringly bespectacled despite his expensive tailoring.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | October 13, 2006
Alex Rider: Operation Stormbreaker, the adventures of a teen superspy created by British novelist Anthony Horowitz, is about as clunky as a movie gets. It lurches from scene to scene with no sense of narrative grace, gives its roster of prominent actors nothing to work with and screeches to a halt with all the grace of a sprinter whose shoelaces have been tied together. Alex Pettyfer, reportedly plucked from a gaggle of some 500 teen-heartthrob wannabes, plays Rider, a heretofore carefree high-schooler who's recruited into Britain's top-secret MI6 after the murder of his superspy uncle/guardian (Ewan McGregor, who displays more charisma during his brief time onscreen than the rest of the cast combined)
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | December 30, 2005
1. King Kong. Peter Jackson, who calls the 1933 Kong the movie that made him want to be a director, remakes one of history's most beloved films without exploiting it. Displaying equal measures of passion and respect, Jackson uses modern technology and storytelling techniques (plus his own magic touch) to create the ultimate fanboy film. Naomi Watts deserves Oscar attention for her turn as Kong's reluctant love interest. 2. The Constant Gardener. Ralph Fiennes and Rachel Weisz make sparks fly as an unlikely couple: He's a British diplomat; she's an unstoppable activist for social justice.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 21, 2005
In Stay, the director, Marc Foster, fresh from Finding Neverland, turns Manhattan into a nightmarish dreamscape and his characters into self-destructive ghosts. Ewan McGregor plays a high-powered shrink who doubles as a university psychiatrist. He's happy in his double professional life and in his private life with a once-suicidal painter (Naomi Watts) until he takes over the treatment of a haunted-looking art student (Ryan Gosling) who intends to kill himself on his 21st birthday. Soon, every aspect of the hero's existence funnels into the patient's psychic vortex.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | August 19, 2005
Valiant in name. But Valiant in aim? Or effort? It's a "stiff upper beak" comedy about heroic British homing pigeons fending off Nazi falcons as they bravely carry messages from the French Resistance to the Allies on the eve of D-Day. It's a perfectly competent cartoon, if rarely a thing of beauty. It's occasionally funny -- so long as you get that whole "Never so few" Battle of Britain fighter-squadron milieu and Monty Python's famous skewering of it. Not that your average 5- to 10-year-old will.
FEATURES
November 13, 2009
A Christmas Carol ( 1 STAR) $30 million $30 million 1 week Rated : PG Running time : 1:36 What it's about : Director Robert Zemeckis reimagines the Dickens classic as a 3-D action-thriller zooming through Victorian London. Our take : By the time the film finishes piling its many shiny presents with their many bells and whistles under the tree, there's no room left for tears for Tiny Tim. Bah humbug, indeed. Michael Jackson's This Is It . ( 3 STARS)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.