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By Laura Vecsey | October 24, 2003
MIAMI - Fortysomething starter David Wells did not make it to the second inning. Another Yankee bites the dust. The Evil Empire is crumbling, except for that most pesky postseason Captain Crunch, Derek Jeter! Somewhere in New England, Red Sox fans are laughing. OK, they're not laughing, even at the notion that the Yankees lost their Game 5 starter to back spasms, that reliever Jose Contreras - the crucible of all that Evil Empire talk - faltered and the Yankees' bullpen and rotation are now in grave danger with the Yankees trailing this World Series, 3-2, to the Florida Marlins.
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Kevin Cowherd, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
Orioles fans are chortling this morning after the Detroit Tigers routed the New York Yankees 8-1 Thursday for a four-game sweep of the American League Championship Series. This was an unbelievably humiliating series for the Yankees, which always plays well here. It's been fun watching the notorious New York media savage the home team, too. The Yankees seemed intent in mailing this one in from the beginning. It didn't help that Yankees' ace  C.C. Sabathia, who surrendered 11 hits and six runs, appeared to be throwing batting practice to the Tigers yesterday.
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NEWS
By Donald Kimelman | February 19, 1992
NO ONE could accuse Time magazine of being slow in proclaiming a trend, so the cover of Time's Feb. 10 issue could stand as official notice of a great shift in American thinking: Our long obsession with the (former) Soviet Union has ended; our new obsession with Japan has begun.Indeed, the Time cover borrowed a familiar motif from the Cold War years. The two flags are dramatically juxtaposed, a study in red and white. The text reads: "America in the mind of Japan, Japan in the mind of America."
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | December 18, 2009
E ver since the news broke last week that Brian Billick would be a commentator for the Ravens game Sunday against the Chicago Bears, there were many trips to my mailbox. I knew he would send me a Christmas card. Or call, or send a telegram or a text message. At least, give me a little something. But nothing. Go figure. For nine years, Billick and I had one of the best running shows in Baltimore sports history, and now after a near two-year separation, he's treating me like last year's Christmas tree.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 18, 1993
Whoever owns the cable controls the mind of America.Nothing subverts the American way of life like soft-drink tampering. Had the Evil Empire not collapsed, you would have suspected it.
NEWS
By J.D. Considine | December 29, 1996
The season of joy has passed, and the more somber season of review is upon us. In arts and entertainment, 1996 was marked by many a going (Horn & Horn lunchroom, Shakespeare on Wheels, the announcement of David Zinman's departure) and an important staying (the Lucas Collection). Bad guys (Jack Valenti with his Hollywood-friendly TV ratings system) were as likely to make news as angels (John Travolta in "Michael"), and personalities (the Michael Jackson marriage saga) got more attention than performances (Alanis Morissette's best-selling album)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine | April 18, 1996
Lionel RichieLouder Than Words (Mercury 314 532 240)Remember when the singer Lionel Richie most resembled was Barry Manilow? When his greatest strength seemed to be slow-'n'-sappy ballads such as "Three Times a Lady" and "Still"? Well, as "Louder Than Words" clearly articulates, those days are long gone. If anything, the singer he most often sounds like on these 12 tunes is not Manilow, but Marvin Gaye. From the funky, hypnotic groove of "I Wanna Take You Down" to the jazzy sophistication of "Lovers at First Sight," Richie evokes both Gaye's satin-smooth delivery and genre-jumping ambition.
NEWS
By BEN WATTENBERG | January 2, 1992
Washington. - We do not have a winner, not yet, but -- Wow! -- do we have an idea!In this space, in early December, a contest was born: To create a new holiday, preferably global, to celebrate the end of the Cold War. Readers were asked to submit a name, a date, a ritual and an essay.The response was robust, and mail is still arriving with wonderful, wild and often touching thoughts.Now the Soviet Union is history. Gorbachev is rolling over his IRA. There are new nations. We need an interim report and further plans.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | May 24, 1995
Dallas -- THERE MAY APPEAR to be no relationship between the end of the Cold War, Oklahoma City, Chechnya and Islamic fundamentalist violence. I can hear the skeptical reader asking: "Have you been smoking something, Ms. Geyer?"Well, before you stop reading and continue to be confused about the horrors of Oklahoma City, let me quote some insightful words from Don Edward Beck and Chris Cowan, two fine young analysts of the social psychology of groups and nations of our times:"This is an extremely dangerous time.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | May 27, 2005
WASHINGTON - Politics gets into everything these days, even Star Wars. "George Lucas must be a Democrat," said my 15-year-old son when he arrived home from the opening day of the latest Star Wars movie, Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith. Ah, the Force is strong in this one, I thought, echoing Darth Vader. For, without the benefit of any advance word or special Jedi abilities, my young Jedi easily detected the anti-Bush propaganda that some liberals, to their delight, and some conservatives, to their fuming outrage, allege is embedded in Mr. Lucas' new flick.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | October 23, 2007
So, is it time to start really disliking the New England Patriots? The beat-down of the Dolphins was certainly predictable. The Patriots have become the equivalent of a powerhouse college team that can run up the score at will against lesser opponents. They have a coach who is a convicted (by the NFL) angle-shooter. And a front office that is playing Big Brother by forcing an online ticket broker to give up the names and personal identification of 13,000 people who were involved in Patriots ticket transactions during the past several years.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN REPORTER | December 12, 2006
The Orioles' second-tier status in the American League East often works against them during free agency. However, for their newest player, it was one of the main draws to signing with the Orioles. "I love trying to battle ... the two Evil Empires, I call them, between Boston and New York, and knock those teams off," said Jay Payton, the 34-year-old outfielder, who hit .296 with 10 home runs and 59 RBIs for the Oakland Athletics last season. "It's a lot of fun to go into the stadiums and play in front of those crowds with all that energy."
NEWS
By Clarence Page | May 27, 2005
WASHINGTON - Politics gets into everything these days, even Star Wars. "George Lucas must be a Democrat," said my 15-year-old son when he arrived home from the opening day of the latest Star Wars movie, Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith. Ah, the Force is strong in this one, I thought, echoing Darth Vader. For, without the benefit of any advance word or special Jedi abilities, my young Jedi easily detected the anti-Bush propaganda that some liberals, to their delight, and some conservatives, to their fuming outrage, allege is embedded in Mr. Lucas' new flick.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2004
In 1980, the United States was at the end of a decade that had seen its self-image battered and bruised - by the scandals of Watergate, the troubled end of the Vietnam War, the hostages in Iran. Malaise was the operative word. Into this murkiness came the clarity of Ronald Reagan. Many found it a welcome antidote. It was among the 40th president's most important rhetorical strengths - a moral certainty that made issues clear and simple. It was essentially a wartime stance - we are good and the enemy is bad. That has proved to be such a powerful force in American politics in the last half-century that whenever this country loses an enemy, it quickly finds another one - or at least its leaders do. "Having an enemy is galvanizing," says Shawn Parry-Giles, who studies political discourse in the communications department at the University of Maryland, College Park.
SPORTS
By Laura Vecsey | October 24, 2003
MIAMI - Fortysomething starter David Wells did not make it to the second inning. Another Yankee bites the dust. The Evil Empire is crumbling, except for that most pesky postseason Captain Crunch, Derek Jeter! Somewhere in New England, Red Sox fans are laughing. OK, they're not laughing, even at the notion that the Yankees lost their Game 5 starter to back spasms, that reliever Jose Contreras - the crucible of all that Evil Empire talk - faltered and the Yankees' bullpen and rotation are now in grave danger with the Yankees trailing this World Series, 3-2, to the Florida Marlins.
SPORTS
By Laura Vecsey | January 3, 2003
EVER SINCE it was clear that Orioles owner Peter Angelos was going to change his administration, Mike Flanagan was billed as a man with a vision for how Baltimore could return to baseball glory. That always sounded so good. Yesterday during a lunch-time gab session in his new Camden Yards office, it seemed equally reassuring to find that Flanagan is also a man with a sense of humor. You won't catch this American League East team leader throwing chairs, breaking windows or hurling banner-headline insults at "the Evil Empire" as they're doing in New York and Boston.
SPORTS
By Laura Vecsey | January 3, 2003
EVER SINCE it was clear that Orioles owner Peter Angelos was going to change his administration, Mike Flanagan was billed as a man with a vision for how Baltimore could return to baseball glory. That always sounded so good. Yesterday during a lunch-time gab session in his new Camden Yards office, it seemed equally reassuring to find that Flanagan is also a man with a sense of humor. You won't catch this American League East team leader throwing chairs, breaking windows or hurling banner-headline insults at "the Evil Empire" as they're doing in New York and Boston.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 20, 1999
HOLLYWOOD -- It began in a galaxy far, far away.Well, Melbourne, Australia, actually. But just as Luke Skywalker journeyed from his farm to battle the evil empire, so too did Lincoln Gasking travel from his homeland to become the first person in line to see the new "Star Wars" movie at Mann's Chinese Theatre here."
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 31, 2002
WASHINGTON - President Bush's description of Iran, Iraq and North Korea as an "axis of evil" put those countries - and America's allies - on notice that he is determined to blunt the danger they pose, possibly with military force, officials said yesterday. The administration gave no sign that Bush has settled on a specific plan of action - military or diplomatic - to force the three regimes to abandon their chemical, biological and nuclear weapons programs and their links to a sprawling underworld of terror.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 20, 1999
HOLLYWOOD -- It began in a galaxy far, far away.Well, Melbourne, Australia, actually. But just as Luke Skywalker journeyed from his farm to battle the evil empire, so too did Lincoln Gasking travel from his homeland to become the first person in line to see the new "Star Wars" movie at Mann's Chinese Theatre here."
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