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By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
Pray consider this sentence from one of Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe murder mysteries: "Everyone has something they don't want anyone to see; that is one of the functions of a home, to provide a spot to keep such things. "  I offer it not as a response to the specious argument that if you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear from the National Security Agency's surveillance,* but rather to consider it as further evidence for singular they . To my mind, it carries more weight than Jane Austen's every body ... they .  The first reason is that it appears in The Red Box , published in 1936.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 27, 2014
Regarding your editorial "Cops and cameras" (Sept. 24), in the aftermath of the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., many city councils and police departments across the country are considering or outfitting their officers with body cameras. Requiring officers to wear body cameras makes sense. It will make them think twice before resorting to more aggressive tactics in dealing with citizens during street stops and calls for service. And since some interactions between police and the public may lead to charges of officer misconduct, the video feed may help police department internal affairs investigators, judges and juries make more informed decisions regarding an appropriate disposition.
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NEWS
December 6, 2010
When I read the article about the African-American teen being attacked by a member of a Jewish community watch dog group ( "Tension in Park Heights," Dec. 5), I saw it as another incident of crime in the city. I was then astounded to read that the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance was suddenly calling for the "violent fringe group" Shomrim to be disbanded! Was this incident one of many such attacks? Is there any indication that this group are vigilantes, out to get blacks?
NEWS
September 22, 2014
Last week, Jim Perdue spoke at a Maryland Chamber of Commerce event to complain about the regulatory environment in the state where his company roosts. "The problem is, we have no seat at the table in Maryland," the Perdue Farms chairman said, according to the Baltimore Business Journal. "Even if we have an onerous thing that happens in Virginia or Delaware, we can sit at the table and at least express our opinion. " Wow. Just wow. No doubt there are a lot of corporate CEOs out there who are nodding their heads in agreement at Mr. Perdue's chirping.
NEWS
October 4, 2012
The people of Garrett and Allegany counties should know that fracking is giving them a chance to have flammable drinking water, and that benzene is causing their cancers. Del. Wendell R. Beitzel must have forgotten his biology background to side with corporate interests. Legislation in Pennsylvania prevents physicians from talking with their patients who are injured by fracking contamination. If fracking is so great, why have we seen no evidence of this since its invention in 1947?
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
Baltimore Police are investigating after drug evidence vanished Thursday from the agency's evidence control unit in police headquarters. Capt. Eric Kowalczyk confirmed that a citizen was in the evidence unit Thursday to pick up property, and drug evidence went "missing. " He would not identify the evidence or elaborate on how much was taken or how the chain of custody was broken. "We are currently conducting a criminal and administrative investigation to see what transpired," Kowalczyk said.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 1, 2010
A drunken driver crashes into another vehicle. The drunk is injured. The other driver is hurt - maybe even killed. So the drunk gets rushed to the hospital. A police investigator, trained in the handling of evidence in such cases, goes there, too, hoping to collect the blood samples that could convict the perpetrator of driving under the influence or even more serious charges. But once in the emergency room, the investigator is told it is hospital policy not to allow its medical personnel to help collect such evidence because they could be hauled into court and diverted from patient care.
NEWS
September 27, 2014
Regarding your editorial "Cops and cameras" (Sept. 24), in the aftermath of the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., many city councils and police departments across the country are considering or outfitting their officers with body cameras. Requiring officers to wear body cameras makes sense. It will make them think twice before resorting to more aggressive tactics in dealing with citizens during street stops and calls for service. And since some interactions between police and the public may lead to charges of officer misconduct, the video feed may help police department internal affairs investigators, judges and juries make more informed decisions regarding an appropriate disposition.
NEWS
April 30, 2012
The Maryland SPCA is not only disappointed in the Maryland Court of Appeals recent ruling stating all "pit bulls" are inherently dangerous but also Dan Rodricks ' commentary ("Pit bulls: Own at your risk," April 30). It is tragic to hear of anyone harmed by an animal. We believe these situations can be avoided by responsible dog owners. To prevent dog bites and attacks, owners must appropriately supervise their dogs, provide them with training and socialization, and have them spayed/neutered.
EXPLORE
November 14, 2012
In response to your letter to the editor on dinosaurs not being around 67 million years ago ("Bloody evidence undercuts dogmatic view of dinosaurs," Nov. 8): Yes, Dr. Mary Schweitzer's article in Dec. 6, 2010 Scientific American does talk about her finding preserved soft tissue in a fossil ... but it also says that fossil was 67 million years old. Elizabeth Reindollar Laurel
NEWS
Justin Fenton, Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
Like many artists of his genre, East Baltimore rapper Young Moose uses his lyrics and music videos to depict the harsh reality of his surroundings, with images of men flashing guns, drugs and cash. But as his career seemed to be taking off this summer, with an opening slot for an arena show by a popular national artist beckoning, a city detective was working to turn the budding performer's YouTube videos against him. After police say they found dozens of heroin gel caps in his family's home, Det. Daniel Hersl noted those videos in charging documents, writing that Young Moose "raps about distributing narcotics, violence and using a firearm to commit violence.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
The State Board of Elections has alerted the Office of the State Prosecutor to a report that 164 people voted in both Maryland and Virginia in the November 2012 presidential election, in violation of the law. Election officials confirmed Thursday that the referral included 17 cases in which the Fairfax County, Va., elections board investigated the report by outside advocacy groups and said they found that ballots had been cast in that county and...
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
The state's highest court ordered a new trial Wednesday for a former Baltimore police sergeant convicted nearly two decades ago of murdering his young mistress - a ruling that could affect cases that relied on bullet testing used for decades until being debunked. Gina Nueslein, a 22-year-old clerk at a Royal Farms, became entangled with Sgt. James Kulbicki, who was 14 years her senior, in a relationship that soured as she sued him for child support. Twenty years later, Kulbicki has a chance to demonstrate the innocence he has maintained, but Nueslein's family must experience the ordeal of her death again.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Some foster children were placed in the care of relatives with a history of alleged abuse or neglect because Maryland's social services agency did not properly monitor local agencies, according to a new audit. State auditors found that 16 children, ranging in age from 2 months to nearly 5 years old, were put in the care of relatives despite "credible evidence of abuse or neglect" by them before or during the placements. The Office of Legislative Audits, which released the report this week, reviewed records from July 2010 to January 2013.
NEWS
August 7, 2014
Your headline "Fetuses show signs of learning at 34 weeks" (July 27) was inconsistent with the content of the story accompanying it. The author admitted that the findings were "not statistically significant. " In layperson's terms, "not statistically significant" means that the evidence is not strong enough support a conclusion one way or the other. Scientist Carl Sagan famously said that extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. To claim that fetuses show evidence of learning three weeks earlier than previously thought, the authors would have to show convincing evidence that the earlier work was mistaken.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
Police investigating an alleged domestic dispute at the Bel Air home of a retired Baltimore police officer last month found a gun that had been seized by city police and stored as evidence, authorities said Wednesday. Officers were called to the Dunsinnan Trail home of retired Baltimore Police Lt. Col. Dan Lioi on June 15, according to a spokeswoman for the Harford County sheriff's office. Following standard practice in cases involving allegations of domestic violence, spokeswoman Cristie Kahler said, police took five guns from Lioi's home.
NEWS
January 29, 2013
America's military veterans are getting shoddy service at the government-run Veterans Administration Hospitals ("Baltimore VA office worst in nation for processing disability claims," Jan. 26). To the people who think Obamacare is the answer to their health care problems, take a look at the VA situation in Baltimore. If this is how the government treats its heroes, what kind of service are you going to get? Leonard Magsamen, Nottingham
NEWS
July 24, 2013
In response to Grafton R. Hersperger's letter ( " Zimmerman was wrong," July 22), There is a reason that the local district attorney did not indict George Zimmerman, and it was the same reason that the special prosecutor bypassed the normal process of going through the grand jury: not enough proof to bring Mr. Zimmerman to trial. Also, if Trayvon Martin had not been suspended from school (for the second time in a year), he would have been at home with his mother 200 miles away.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
A week after a Baltimore County police cadet was accused of stealing drugs from the department's evidence room, prosecutors said they had dropped charges against a defendant in a case in which some of the drugs were seized. The trial of 50-year-old Joseph Thorn was scheduled to begin Thursday in Baltimore County District Court. But with the case seven years old and the drugs now missing, State's Attorney Scott D. Shellenberger said, "we decided the most reasonable thing to do was to dismiss the case.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
When Maryland men's lacrosse coach John Tillman recently hit the recruiting trail, he wasn't entirely sure how players would react to a Terps program making the leap from the Atlantic Coast Conference to the Big Ten, a move that became official Tuesday. Fortunately for Tillman, the transition has not been an issue. "Some of the people we have talked to have been pretty excited about it," he said. "Obviously, the ACC has a great tradition and the Big Ten doesn't yet. But I think people realize there is a lot of potential in that conference.
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