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Eviction

NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | October 1, 2009
A man and a woman have been charged with first-degree murder in the death of a 74-year-old Rosedale man who had planned to evict them from his home, according to Baltimore County police. A relative found the body of David Leroy Weeks on Friday night at his home in the 1200 block of Hilldale Road, police said. Weeks was found in his bed with a pillow taped over his head, and blood was on the sheets, according to police. Michael Paul DiMattei, 35, and Erin Eileen Steffy, 35, had lived with Weeks for several years, but the homeowner had planned to go to court to obtain an eviction notice on the day his body was discovered, police said.
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NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Nick.madigan@baltsun.com | June 16, 2009
An Essex family staved off eviction Monday when a District Court judge declined Baltimore County's request that he order the family off the property. Judge Norman R. Stone III told an attorney representing the county that the issues involved in the case were too complex for easy resolution and that county officials had not proved they were entitled to remove James M. Schneider, his wife and their children from their home without helping them relocate. "I wish I could put a stake through the heart of this case," Stone said, "but I can't."
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN | April 29, 2009
Lexington Market doesn't want the Utz potato chip stand anymore. The workers say they sell chips and always have. The feds say that - at least until one of the owners, a former bounty hunter, was busted April 1 - they also sold guns to gangs. Crab cakes and Uzis may fit the stereotype of a violent city, but it's not what the purveyors of a world-famous market want to promote. So Lexington Market Inc. filed suit in Baltimore's Wabash District Court against Stella Tsourakis, the woman they say owns the place along with her brother, Michael Papantonakis, who is in jail facing federal firearms charges.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Liz F. Kay and Gus G. Sentementes and Liz F. Kay,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com and liz.kay@baltsun.com | February 24, 2009
The Baltimore City Council is considering a plan to slow the foreclosure process in hopes of stemming the tide of evictions, which city housing activists have tried to combat recently with protests and, in at least one case, allegedly illegal measures. As the Obama administration moves on a national plan to tackle the mortgage crisis, City Council members Mary Pat Clarke and Bill Henry, both Democrats, have introduced a plan to extend the time between foreclosure and eviction from 14 days to 365 days to encourage lenders to negotiate with owners who are falling behind on loan payments.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | February 24, 2009
A federal biologist plans to climb 80 feet into an ancient oak tree near Glenn L. Martin State Airport this morning to knock down a nest built by a breeding pair of bald eagles. The eviction is part of an effort to drive the nesting birds away from the airport, where they have been judged a hazard to aircraft operations. "Apparently it's an attractive tree for eagles," said Jonathan Dean, a spokesman for the Maryland Aviation Administration. It's a tall, sturdy perch, close to the food resources of the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | December 31, 2008
Seven years ago, James M. Schneider was told by Baltimore County public works officials that a large sewer pipe would have to be laid through his 1.4-acre property at the edge of the Back River. Once the job was completed, he was told, the land would be returned to its former condition. However, damage to the Essex property - and especially to its septic system - was such that the county ultimately condemned and bought the land, its seven-bedroom house and a smaller adjoining residence from the Schneiders and agreed in writing to help relocate the nine-member family to a comparable property.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | October 9, 2008
Sheriff's office to halt serving eviction notices CHICAGO: Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart said yesterday that his office plans to stop serving eviction notices on people who have fallen behind on mortgage payments as well as renters unaware their buildings have fallen in arrears. He said his action was necessary in light of the national foreclosure crisis that is driving down the American economy. Dart acknowledged that he could be found in contempt of court for ignoring court orders but said he was willing to risk that to carry out "justice."
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | May 21, 2008
Renters who face eviction in Baltimore because their landlords are in foreclosure would be notified and would have more time to move under a bill advanced yesterday by a City Council committee. Officials with Mayor Sheila Dixon's administration, which sponsored the measure, said the bill is intended to prevent tenants from being notified of a foreclosure for the first time when a sheriff's deputy arrives to evict them. The proposal, which was approved unanimously by a council committee and is expected to win full approval this year, could prove particularly important if the number of foreclosures continues to rise, proponents said.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | May 17, 2008
Samantha Johnson hasn't had an easy time of it. A year ago today, she was hospitalized in a psychiatric ward after attempting suicide, according to court documents, and was later fired from her job at Wal-Mart for missing too much work. One of her two sons, Timothy, 11, has severe asthma. Now Johnson and her boys face eviction from their apartment in a Cherry Hill public housing project because she's behind on the rent. Had it not been for a lawsuit filed Thursday by the Legal Aid Bureau on her behalf and that of three other families, Johnson, 31, might have been on the street as soon as next week.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | May 6, 2008
The stalls where the lunch crowd lined up for pizza and burgers were bare. Yellow caution tape hung along the counters where groups of schoolchildren used to order gelato and bags of candy. The ovens and fryers and refrigerators were gone. The historic Market House in downtown Annapolis has been the site of plenty of turmoil in recent years. But nothing prepared customers and the remaining merchants for the sight that greeted them yesterday morning. Four businesses had vanished overnight.
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