Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEvgeny Kissin
IN THE NEWS

Evgeny Kissin

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | February 15, 1993
As Evgeny Kissin gets older his style of playing may change and his repertory may expand beyond the Romantic works he now chooses to play. But, as his recital Saturday night at the Kennedy Center made clear, it is impossible to imagine that this 21-year-old Russian -- or anyone else, for that matter -- will ever play the music of Chopin better.Even the greatest Chopinists usually play one part of the composer's oeuvre more persuasively than others. Some are better with the "French" or "salon" Chopin (the nocturnes and waltzes)
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 8, 2005
At 33, Russian-born pianist Evgeny Kissin remains exactly what he was at 10 - a formidable force of nature and art. He gave a compelling demonstration of that lasting power Wednesday night in a sold-out recital for the Washington Performing Arts Society at the Music Center at Strathmore. He'll repeat the program here next week in a Baltimore Symphony Orchestra presentation. Kissin's combination of intellect and muscle couldn't have been more apparent than it was in his performance of Stravinsky's Petrouchka Suite.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 31, 1996
Schumann, Fantasy in C major, Liszt, "Transcendental Etudes" Nos. 5 ("Feux Follets"), 8 ("Wilde Jagd"), 10 in F minor, 11 ("Harmonies du Soir"), and 12 ("Chasse-Neige"), performed by pianist Evgeny Kissin (RCA Victor Red Seal 09026-68262-2):Only 24 years old, Evgeny Kissin has already given us some of the finest piano recordings ever made. This tops everything he has already done.The Fantasy is one of the most difficult works in the literature, musically as well as technically. Kissin makes us forget about its difficulty, allowing us to focus on how intensely human it is. In the first movement, the pianist immediately makes the listener feel as if he has suddenly caught a singer midway in passionate song.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2005
This has been an exceptionally rich season for piano fans, and it's not over. Here are some of the notable keyboard artists performing in the area during the next few weeks: Evgeny Kissin - The sensational Russian pianist, who moved from child prodigy to mature artist without skipping a beat (he's 33 now), plays works by Chopin, Medtner and Stravinsky in recitals at 8 p.m. Wednesday at the Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda (202-785-9727) and 7:30 p.m. April 14 at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall (410-783-8000)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | February 7, 1993
Boston -- Evgeny Kissin is rehearsing the Rachmaninoff Third Concerto with the Boston Symphony. The music pours out of the young Russian pianist: It is brilliant, it is majestic, it is sensuous and -- something scarcely, if ever, heard in this virtuoso concerto -- it is consoling.Where these qualities of heart and wisdom come from in this 21-year-old -- the most talked-about young pianist in the world today -- is a mystery much discussed. When Kissin's first recordings as a 12-year-old began to filter through the pre-perestroika Iron Curtain, a joke made the rounds of piano aficionados: The KGB had found a way to transplant the brain of an 80-year-old master into the body of a boy.At a post-rehearsal reception for Kissin, Boston Symphony music director Seiji Ozawa and executives of BMG Classics' RCA Victor Red Seal label, who were in Boston to record the concerto for release later this year, Ozawa handed Kissin the orchestra's 74-year-old copy of the score.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Classical Music Critic | September 9, 1999
Celebration is the word that best describes the upcoming music season.For starters, the 1999-2000 season marks the beginning of Yuri Temirkanov's first season as the new music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.Oops. Make that the great Russian conductor's first half-season. Temirkanov doesn't make his official debut as the BSO's new music director until January 20 and 21, when he leads the orchestra in Mahler's Symphony No. 2 ("Resurrection"). If that first program suggests a rebirth of the orchestra, subsequent programs suggest ways in which Temirkanov will lead it in new directions: fresh repertory (such as Shostakovich's Symphony No. 13 -- "Babi Yar" -- the greatest work to come out of the Holocaust, June 22-24)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 8, 1997
Meyerhoff Hall's classical-music audience can be an annoyingly restless, candy-wrapper-rustling bunch. During pianist Evgeny Kissin's solo recital there a few weeks ago, however, the hall was as quiet as a church. And when the pianist finished, the sold-out audience jumped to its feet with joyous cheers that sounded almost like spontaneous testifying at a revival meeting.Curtain call after curtain call brought Kissin back; and hundreds of fans, many of them teen-agers, kept the pianist busy signing autographs until well after midnight.
NEWS
By STEPHEN WIGLER and STEPHEN WIGLER,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 7, 1996
Evgeny Kissin was the kind of child prodigy who made people believe in the possibility of a Mozart. Before he was 10, students and teachers at the Gnessin School for Gifted Children in Moscow whispered that Kissin talked to God. His first public concerts at 11 made him the talk of the city. And when his first recordings as a 12-year-old began to filter through the pre-perestroika Iron Curtain, a joke made the rounds among piano aficionados: The KGB had found a way to transplant the brain of a master into the body of a boy.Less than six years after moving to the United States with his family, Kissin, 24, is the most sought-after, most talked-about pianist in the world.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 29, 1998
Three dazzling piano releases come from Russian pianists: The first is from a deservedly celebrated musician; the second is not as famous as he should be; the third is someone you've never heard of.Pianist No. 1 is Evgeny Kissin, whose most recent CD contains remarkable performances of Beethoven's Sonata No. 14 (the "Moonlight"), Franck's "Prelude, Chorale and Fugue" and Brahms' "Paganini Variations." Kissin's performance of the latter is one of the great achievements in the history of piano playing.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 8, 2005
At 33, Russian-born pianist Evgeny Kissin remains exactly what he was at 10 - a formidable force of nature and art. He gave a compelling demonstration of that lasting power Wednesday night in a sold-out recital for the Washington Performing Arts Society at the Music Center at Strathmore. He'll repeat the program here next week in a Baltimore Symphony Orchestra presentation. Kissin's combination of intellect and muscle couldn't have been more apparent than it was in his performance of Stravinsky's Petrouchka Suite.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Classical Music Critic | September 9, 1999
Celebration is the word that best describes the upcoming music season.For starters, the 1999-2000 season marks the beginning of Yuri Temirkanov's first season as the new music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.Oops. Make that the great Russian conductor's first half-season. Temirkanov doesn't make his official debut as the BSO's new music director until January 20 and 21, when he leads the orchestra in Mahler's Symphony No. 2 ("Resurrection"). If that first program suggests a rebirth of the orchestra, subsequent programs suggest ways in which Temirkanov will lead it in new directions: fresh repertory (such as Shostakovich's Symphony No. 13 -- "Babi Yar" -- the greatest work to come out of the Holocaust, June 22-24)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 23, 1999
Three years ago, pianist Evgeny Kissin took an apparently self-imposed sabbatical from the music of Chopin.Perhaps he was tired of being identified as a Chopin player -- pianist Martha Argerich had all but anointed Kissin as the greatest living Chopin player when he was just a 12-year-old -- and of the consequent critical carping about his interpretive insights into other composers.In appearances over the last three seasons, therefore, Kissin has been busy demonstrating that, no matter what the repertory, he casts as large a shadow as any pianist alive.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 29, 1998
Three dazzling piano releases come from Russian pianists: The first is from a deservedly celebrated musician; the second is not as famous as he should be; the third is someone you've never heard of.Pianist No. 1 is Evgeny Kissin, whose most recent CD contains remarkable performances of Beethoven's Sonata No. 14 (the "Moonlight"), Franck's "Prelude, Chorale and Fugue" and Brahms' "Paganini Variations." Kissin's performance of the latter is one of the great achievements in the history of piano playing.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 8, 1997
Meyerhoff Hall's classical-music audience can be an annoyingly restless, candy-wrapper-rustling bunch. During pianist Evgeny Kissin's solo recital there a few weeks ago, however, the hall was as quiet as a church. And when the pianist finished, the sold-out audience jumped to its feet with joyous cheers that sounded almost like spontaneous testifying at a revival meeting.Curtain call after curtain call brought Kissin back; and hundreds of fans, many of them teen-agers, kept the pianist busy signing autographs until well after midnight.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 11, 1996
Midori will return to the scene of the crime tonight when she performs the Brahms Violin Concerto with David Zinman and the Baltimore Symphony in the orchestra's first subscription concert.This is not to say that there was anything criminal about the way Midori, then 19, played the Brahms back in 1991 when she made her first appearance here with Zinman and the BSO. It was, in fact, a remarkable performance in which difficult-to-reach chords that many violinists fake were dispatched with ease; carefully controlled vibrato never obscured the pure core of the note; bow changes were seamless; and intonation had an almost unearthly purity.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 31, 1996
Schumann, Fantasy in C major, Liszt, "Transcendental Etudes" Nos. 5 ("Feux Follets"), 8 ("Wilde Jagd"), 10 in F minor, 11 ("Harmonies du Soir"), and 12 ("Chasse-Neige"), performed by pianist Evgeny Kissin (RCA Victor Red Seal 09026-68262-2):Only 24 years old, Evgeny Kissin has already given us some of the finest piano recordings ever made. This tops everything he has already done.The Fantasy is one of the most difficult works in the literature, musically as well as technically. Kissin makes us forget about its difficulty, allowing us to focus on how intensely human it is. In the first movement, the pianist immediately makes the listener feel as if he has suddenly caught a singer midway in passionate song.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2005
This has been an exceptionally rich season for piano fans, and it's not over. Here are some of the notable keyboard artists performing in the area during the next few weeks: Evgeny Kissin - The sensational Russian pianist, who moved from child prodigy to mature artist without skipping a beat (he's 33 now), plays works by Chopin, Medtner and Stravinsky in recitals at 8 p.m. Wednesday at the Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda (202-785-9727) and 7:30 p.m. April 14 at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall (410-783-8000)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 7, 1995
WASHINGTON -- One look at the size of the orchestra that waited for Boris Berezovsky to begin Tchaikovsky's First Piano Concerto at the Kennedy Center on Sunday was enough to let one know that something unusual was about to happen.The Bolshoi Symphony Orchestra, which had opened its program under music director Peter Feranec earlier with excerpts from the same composer's "Sleeping Beauty," had been reduced in size to a slender five double basses and six cellos from a beefy nine double basses and 12 cellos.
NEWS
By STEPHEN WIGLER and STEPHEN WIGLER,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 7, 1996
Evgeny Kissin was the kind of child prodigy who made people believe in the possibility of a Mozart. Before he was 10, students and teachers at the Gnessin School for Gifted Children in Moscow whispered that Kissin talked to God. His first public concerts at 11 made him the talk of the city. And when his first recordings as a 12-year-old began to filter through the pre-perestroika Iron Curtain, a joke made the rounds among piano aficionados: The KGB had found a way to transplant the brain of a master into the body of a boy.Less than six years after moving to the United States with his family, Kissin, 24, is the most sought-after, most talked-about pianist in the world.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 7, 1995
WASHINGTON -- One look at the size of the orchestra that waited for Boris Berezovsky to begin Tchaikovsky's First Piano Concerto at the Kennedy Center on Sunday was enough to let one know that something unusual was about to happen.The Bolshoi Symphony Orchestra, which had opened its program under music director Peter Feranec earlier with excerpts from the same composer's "Sleeping Beauty," had been reduced in size to a slender five double basses and six cellos from a beefy nine double basses and 12 cellos.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.