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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2012
The domestic drama unfolding on the stage of Everyman Theatre these days in Michael Weller's "Fifty Words" can get pretty messy — stories about marriage frequently are. But the set that the two actors in this play get to inhabit is a study in calm, careful planning and execution. That set is the work of Tim Mackabee, who is making his local professional debut as scenic designer with this production. It's a particularly satisfying homecoming for the New York-based Mackabee, who was born in Baltimore, raised in Perry Hall and attended the Carver Center for Arts and Technology, the magnet high school in Towson.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
The well-seasoned, if unsteady, Shakespearean actor known only as "Sir" in Ronald Harwood's 1980 play "The Dresser" has an ego the size of Wales. No surprise there. But he also has enough dependency and self-esteem issues to keep an analyst busy for decades. The wonder is that anyone would put up with, let alone attend to, such a demanding mess of a man. But Norman, who dresses and sees to any other of Sir's backstage needs, has long carried devotion to an extreme. After so many years of doting and enabling, neither man can fully exist without the other.
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By Sloane Brown and Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2010
Design is important to Lisa Reed. The 35-year-old Hampden resident has made it her career as an architect at Cho Benn Holback + Associates. The shape of something is also important when it comes to her personal style. When we "Glimpsed" Reed at Everyman Theatre's gala at the American Visionary Art Museum, she explained her style philosophy: "As long as I have on one nice thing, I can cheapen everything else up and be a little more trendy. But I like to keep one classic piece in the mix."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| February 25, 2014
Tony Foreman of Foreman Wolf will help transform Everyman Theatre into an "Italian festival" of food and wine on April 5 for a fundraising event for the theater. Organizers invite guests to "wander the rooms of our new home to find crudo paired with festive sparking wines, grilled meats and pastas alongside the bold flavors of red wine, Italian pastries, silent and live auctions of food, wine and travel and more!" There will be music from Baltimore's Bosley along with fencing, cabaret, comedy and dancing.
ENTERTAINMENT
Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2013
After the final bows were taken during Everyman Theatre's inaugural opening night performance of "August: Osage County," an exhuberant yell could be heard from behind the closed curtain. It was an expression of the actors' relief at having survived the challenges posed by playwright Tracy Letts' Tony Award-winning black comedy, "August: Osage County. " And it was an expression of delight in finally having a performing home suitable for an established ensemble theater troupe. That sense of accomplishment was the theme of the theater's official opening this weekend, which included a cocktail party and post-performance cast party on Friday; a gala dinner and performance on Saturday, and a Sunday brunch.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2013
There has been a change in the lineup for the second production in Everyman Theatre's new home -- Yasmina Reza's bitingly funny "God of Carnage. " Due to a shoulder injury, resident company member Bruce Randolph Nelson had to bow out. The role of Alan Raleigh, half of one of the two tense couples at the heart of the play, will now be performed by Tim Getman. (Nelson is expected to be back onstage as scheduled for Everyman's season finale, George Farquhar 's "The Beaux' Stratagem.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
The well-seasoned, if unsteady, Shakespearean actor known only as "Sir" in Ronald Harwood's 1980 play "The Dresser" has an ego the size of Wales. No surprise there. But he also has enough dependency and self-esteem issues to keep an analyst busy for decades. The wonder is that anyone would put up with, let alone attend to, such a demanding mess of a man. But Norman, who dresses and sees to any other of Sir's backstage needs, has long carried devotion to an extreme. After so many years of doting and enabling, neither man can fully exist without the other.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | September 2, 2011
An area theater that does consistently fine work is beginning its last season in its current home. Everyman Theatre's upcoming season is slated to be its final one on N. Charles Street, in the Station North arts and entertainment district. Work is well under way on its new home downtown in the renovated Town Theater, just around the corner from the Hippodrome Theatre. So this will be a season to remember in the long local history of Everyman. It kicks off Sept. 7 with Lorraine Hansberry's classic drama, “A Raisin in the Sun.” This timeless story about the aspirations of a black family in Chicago in the 1950s still resonates in any discussion of the American dream.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
It could stand a little more swash, and maybe an extra buckle or two, but Everyman Theatre's staging of "The Beaux' Stratagem" provides a diverting close to the company's first season in its new home. The space itself has a starring role, thanks to Daniel Ettinger's colorful set. It gives the large cast, vibrantly costumed by David Burdick, plenty of room to romp in, and considerable romping is called for in this Restoration comedy from 1707 by George Farquhar. The original play does not see the spotlight these days.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
Booth, the younger of two brothers in Suzan-Lori Parks' cauterizing play “Topdog/Underdog,” being given a trenchant Baltimore premiere by Everyman Theatre, is determined to perfect the old con game, three-card monte. As he rehearses his spiel before an imaginary audience of potential marks, Booth spouts a rapid-fire mantra, “You pick that card, you pick a loser.” His hands never really move quite fast enough, smooth enough, but that doesn't deter him - he's already decided to change his name to “3-Card” - or dent his contempt for all those supposed losers who will soon lay in his path.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
The Hippodrome Theatre at the France-Merrick Performing Arts Center, a key venue in the blossoming Bromo Tower Arts and Entertainment District, is getting a new president with a history of sparking the redevelopment of an arts community. Ron Legler, president of the Florida Theatrical Association in Orlando and a former chairman of the Downtown Arts District in that city, will succeed Jeff Daniel as Hippodrome president. He is scheduled to start in early May. "I'm very much a community person, as interested in community arts — music, dance, everything — as in Broadway tours," Legler, 46, said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
"Stones in His Pockets," a play about an American film company invading a community in rural Ireland, has more than a dozen characters, but only two actors. That means a lot of quick switches between genders, ages and, above all, accents. For its production of this work by Irish playwright Marie Jones, Center Stage started with a pair of versatile performers - Clinton Brandhagen, an Everyman Theatre resident member; and New York-based Todd Lawson. Then the company brought in a dialect expert to help those disparate voices ring true.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
We can't choose our siblings. But, if we're lucky, we never want to lose the ties that bind us, even when they hurt a little. Or a lot. That's one of the things learned by the three Magrath sisters of Hazlehurst, Miss., over the course of a bumpy day and night in Beth Henley's Pulitzer Prize-winning dramedy “Crimes of the Heart,” now enjoying a brilliant revival by Everyman Theatre. The production, which opened Friday night, has already been extended an extra week. It deserves to run even longer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
On Jan. 14, 2013, a crowd gathered for a ribbon-cutting ceremony on West Fayette Street at the site of what had been the Empire Theatre a century earlier. With a restored, glistening facade and entirely new interior, the venue officially opened as the Everyman Theatre , new home to one of Baltimore's finest cultural assets. One year later, the company is flourishing there. "This was a risky move," says Vincent Lancisi, Everyman's artistic director. "It's nice to walk in the building and go 'Whew, we made it.' We made the transition from [a rented location on North Charles Street]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
The arts world tends to think in terms of September-to-June seasons, rather than calendar years, but it's still fun to look back on the past 12 months and relive the performances that offered extra satisfaction. Although I may have missed some great stuff along the way - it's pretty near impossible to catch everything packed into a given year - I experienced plenty of rewarding activity on the classical music and theater scenes. Here are my picks for the best performing-arts events in Baltimore during 2013.
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2013
In John Logan's heralded play "Red," the brilliant, suffered-no-fools painter Mark Rothko doesn't have much patience for his new assistant, Ken. "You have a lot to learn, young man," the artist says. "Philosophy. Theology. Literature. Poetry. Drama. History. Archaeology. Anthropology. Mythology. Music. … You cannot be an artist until you are civilized. You cannot be civilized until you learn. To be civilized is to know where you belong in the continuum of your art and your world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
We have all seen adults acting - to borrow a song lyric - more like children than children. But, if you're lucky, you've never met anyone quite like the people who spout, spar and spew in “God of Carnage,” the Tony Award-winning Yasmina Reza play currently getting an effective workout at Everyman Theatre. Meet the Novaks, Michael and Veronica, well-to-do parents of a boy who has lost some teeth and a whole lot of playground cred after being clobbered by the son of the likewise well-off Raleighs, Alan and Annette.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
Everyman Theatre will split its 2012-2013 season between two venues, but a common thread unifies the plays — all are Baltimore premieres. There will be six works in all, up from the usual five. The lineup includes recent works by such notable playwrights as Tracy Letts, David Margulies, Suzan Lori-Parks and Yasmina Reza, as well as adaptations by Tom Stoppard and Thornton Wilder. But the biggest news next season is the company's relocation to Fayette Street, around the corner from the Hippodrome in an area that is fast becoming a viable arts district on the city's west side.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
When Rep Stage opens its season this weekend with a production of Horton Foote's "A Young Lady of Property," a nostalgic piece by the author of "The Trip to Bountiful," it may seem like business as usual. The cast features some company regulars, such as Christine Demuth. And the play's director is Michael Stebbins, who ran Rep Stage for the past eight years. He'll be back again next month to star as the East German transvestite in Doug Wright's "I Am My Own Wife. " But if that makes the onstage offerings look familiar at the two-decade-old professional theater company based at Howard Community College, there's been quite a change offstage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2013
The first voice in Tennessee Williams' "The Glass Menagerie" belongs to Tom Wingfield, a budding poet trapped in a boring day job. Serving as guide through the playwright's exquisitely crafted layers of memory and anxiety, Tom dispenses "truth in the pleasant disguise of illusion. " For its season-opening production of this certified classic of the American stage, Everyman Theatre has cast one of its most versatile and gifted resident artists, Clinton Brandhagen, as Tom. "I had to read the play in high school," the Calgary-born Brandhagen, 36, said, "but I never looked at it again.
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