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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2012
The domestic drama unfolding on the stage of Everyman Theatre these days in Michael Weller's "Fifty Words" can get pretty messy — stories about marriage frequently are. But the set that the two actors in this play get to inhabit is a study in calm, careful planning and execution. That set is the work of Tim Mackabee, who is making his local professional debut as scenic designer with this production. It's a particularly satisfying homecoming for the New York-based Mackabee, who was born in Baltimore, raised in Perry Hall and attended the Carver Center for Arts and Technology, the magnet high school in Towson.
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By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Vivienne Shub, who played eccentric personalities as she delighted Baltimore theater audiences during a long and lauded run here, died of heart failure Thursday morning at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. The former Liberty Heights resident was 95. "Vivienne was one of the most talented actresses on the Baltimore scene," said Rhea Feiken, the television personality who performed with her. "You learned a lesson every time you watched her. Her dedication to the theater was enormous.
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By Sloane Brown and Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2010
Design is important to Lisa Reed. The 35-year-old Hampden resident has made it her career as an architect at Cho Benn Holback + Associates. The shape of something is also important when it comes to her personal style. When we "Glimpsed" Reed at Everyman Theatre's gala at the American Visionary Art Museum, she explained her style philosophy: "As long as I have on one nice thing, I can cheapen everything else up and be a little more trendy. But I like to keep one classic piece in the mix."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
  Poor Harry. The struggling actor lucked out auditioning for an understudy gig, but he has little respect for the guy he's understudying -- Jake, a so-so star of low-grade disaster movies. To make things more uncomfortable, the stage manager running the rehearsal turns out to be Harry's former fiancee, Roxanne, and she is far from pleased at the reunion. Still, Harry is determined to plunge into the play, a long-buried work by Franz Kafka filled with challenging existential musings and surreal situations.
ENTERTAINMENT
Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2013
After the final bows were taken during Everyman Theatre's inaugural opening night performance of "August: Osage County," an exhuberant yell could be heard from behind the closed curtain. It was an expression of the actors' relief at having survived the challenges posed by playwright Tracy Letts' Tony Award-winning black comedy, "August: Osage County. " And it was an expression of delight in finally having a performing home suitable for an established ensemble theater troupe. That sense of accomplishment was the theme of the theater's official opening this weekend, which included a cocktail party and post-performance cast party on Friday; a gala dinner and performance on Saturday, and a Sunday brunch.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2013
There has been a change in the lineup for the second production in Everyman Theatre's new home -- Yasmina Reza's bitingly funny "God of Carnage. " Due to a shoulder injury, resident company member Bruce Randolph Nelson had to bow out. The role of Alan Raleigh, half of one of the two tense couples at the heart of the play, will now be performed by Tim Getman. (Nelson is expected to be back onstage as scheduled for Everyman's season finale, George Farquhar 's "The Beaux' Stratagem.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2014
Starting next week with its production of Nina Raine's "Tribes," starring deaf actor John McGinty, Everyman Theatre will offer personal handheld closed captioning devices for all performances. In a statement released Wednesday, founding artistic director Vincent Lancisi said that the company, "an early adopter of this new technology," is "committed to embodying the promise of our name - Everyman Theatre. " "For the first time - long overdue - we are able to invest in technology that says to the deaf and hard-of-hearing communities: 'We value you and we want you to be a part of the Everyman family' ... [We]
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | September 2, 2011
An area theater that does consistently fine work is beginning its last season in its current home. Everyman Theatre's upcoming season is slated to be its final one on N. Charles Street, in the Station North arts and entertainment district. Work is well under way on its new home downtown in the renovated Town Theater, just around the corner from the Hippodrome Theatre. So this will be a season to remember in the long local history of Everyman. It kicks off Sept. 7 with Lorraine Hansberry's classic drama, “A Raisin in the Sun.” This timeless story about the aspirations of a black family in Chicago in the 1950s still resonates in any discussion of the American dream.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
It could stand a little more swash, and maybe an extra buckle or two, but Everyman Theatre's staging of "The Beaux' Stratagem" provides a diverting close to the company's first season in its new home. The space itself has a starring role, thanks to Daniel Ettinger's colorful set. It gives the large cast, vibrantly costumed by David Burdick, plenty of room to romp in, and considerable romping is called for in this Restoration comedy from 1707 by George Farquhar. The original play does not see the spotlight these days.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
The well-seasoned, if unsteady, Shakespearean actor known only as "Sir" in Ronald Harwood's 1980 play "The Dresser" has an ego the size of Wales. No surprise there. But he also has enough dependency and self-esteem issues to keep an analyst busy for decades. The wonder is that anyone would put up with, let alone attend to, such a demanding mess of a man. But Norman, who dresses and sees to any other of Sir's backstage needs, has long carried devotion to an extreme. After so many years of doting and enabling, neither man can fully exist without the other.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Tana Hicken, a Baltimore actress and teacher who deftly portrayed a wide variety of characters on stage during a professional career that spanned more than four decades, died Aug. 17 at her home in Sparks of myositis, an autoimmune disorder. She was 70. "I think she was the finest stage actress I've ever witnessed in my life. She was just riveting," said Vince Lancisi, founder of Everyman Theatre , who first saw Ms. Hicken at Washington's Arena Stage when he was a student at the Catholic University of America.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
A listless west-side block of downtown Baltimore will undergo an energetic makeover if an idea generated by DIY-style theater troupes and local developer Winstead "Ted" Rouse comes to fruition. Their plan, submitted earlier this year when the Baltimore Development Corp. issued a request for proposals, envisions turning three abandoned buildings in the 400 block of N. Howard Street, between West Franklin and West Mulberry, into a hub of theater, dance and more. It could open as early as 2016.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
What we have in "Tribes," the agitated and absorbing play by Nina Raine receiving its Baltimore premiere at Everyman Theatre, isn't a failure to communicate. It's a stubborn, even proud, refusal to communicate. While four members of a well-educated London family speak over and through one another, wounding and goading as they go, the fifth does what he can to keep up, to fit in, or just stay out of the way. He's Billy, the youngest child, born deaf into a hearing family - not a listening family, mind you, just a hearing one. Billy's parents reason that their son is better off not being defined by his deafness, not being assimilated into the deaf community, which would only make him feel more handicapped.
NEWS
By Thomas Maronick Jr | May 29, 2014
Baltimore theater fans are hard-pressed as of late to find a reason to leave the city with so much available right at home: superb local theater companies and community theaters and the renovated Hippodrome . It's a welcome revival of an industry the city was once known for. In its heyday in the 1930s, Baltimore was a theater and music town where the legendary Frank Sinatra, Billie Holiday and countless other stars got their start or visited on...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Many a play deals with language and communication. There is always theatrical ore to be mined in the way people express themselves - or fail to - and how that can complicate so many things in life. British playwright Nina Raine gives the subject an unusual spin in "Tribes," a 2010 work about a young deaf man named Billy, born into a hearing family full of people who communicate all too crassly or ineptly with one another. This funny and touching play, which Everyman Theatre is staging for its season-closing production, features an actor deeply familiar with its central issues.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2014
Starting next week with its production of Nina Raine's "Tribes," starring deaf actor John McGinty, Everyman Theatre will offer personal handheld closed captioning devices for all performances. In a statement released Wednesday, founding artistic director Vincent Lancisi said that the company, "an early adopter of this new technology," is "committed to embodying the promise of our name - Everyman Theatre. " "For the first time - long overdue - we are able to invest in technology that says to the deaf and hard-of-hearing communities: 'We value you and we want you to be a part of the Everyman family' ... [We]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
We have all seen adults acting - to borrow a song lyric - more like children than children. But, if you're lucky, you've never met anyone quite like the people who spout, spar and spew in “God of Carnage,” the Tony Award-winning Yasmina Reza play currently getting an effective workout at Everyman Theatre. Meet the Novaks, Michael and Veronica, well-to-do parents of a boy who has lost some teeth and a whole lot of playground cred after being clobbered by the son of the likewise well-off Raleighs, Alan and Annette.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
Booth, the younger of two brothers in Suzan-Lori Parks' cauterizing play “Topdog/Underdog,” being given a trenchant Baltimore premiere by Everyman Theatre, is determined to perfect the old con game, three-card monte. As he rehearses his spiel before an imaginary audience of potential marks, Booth spouts a rapid-fire mantra, “You pick that card, you pick a loser.” His hands never really move quite fast enough, smooth enough, but that doesn't deter him - he's already decided to change his name to “3-Card” - or dent his contempt for all those supposed losers who will soon lay in his path.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
Everyman Theatre has been on a roll since the beginning of 2013, when the company inaugurated its inviting new downtown space. The first full season in that venue - there's one more play left, "Tribes," opening May 28 - has been marked by exceptionally effective stagings of diverse works (three were given extra weeks to meet demand). "That's why it took so long to come up with a second season," said Everyman's artistic director, Vincent Lancisi. "I really felt intimidated by the scope of this one. " What Lancisi devised for 2014-2015 is a promising mix of three Baltimore premieres and three vintage plays.
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