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By Mike Giuliano | June 7, 2011
George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion" is a witty play whose classic status has never been in doubt, but this comedy is mostly known today as the literary source for the Broadway musical "My Fair Lady. " The Everyman Theatre staging of "Pygmalion" is a fine opportunity to return to the source. As a satirist keenly aware of class differences in Great Britain, Shaw has an especially good ear for how such differences are expressed through speech patterns. That's why he has a field day with this play's premise: a snobby scholar, Henry Higgins (Kyle Prue)
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
  Poor Harry. The struggling actor lucked out auditioning for an understudy gig, but he has little respect for the guy he's understudying -- Jake, a so-so star of low-grade disaster movies. To make things more uncomfortable, the stage manager running the rehearsal turns out to be Harry's former fiancee, Roxanne, and she is far from pleased at the reunion. Still, Harry is determined to plunge into the play, a long-buried work by Franz Kafka filled with challenging existential musings and surreal situations.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | October 24, 1999
Mission: Everyman Theatre, a small equity theater with a professional resident repertory company of artists from the Baltimore/Washington area, is dedicated to presenting quality theater that is accessible and affordable to everyone.Latest accomplishments: The theater started its fourth subscription season (1999-2000) with a more than 72 percent increase over the previous season and record attendance for the season opener, the Baltimore premiere of "Nude with Violin." The company's first managing director, H. Laurens Wilson, was hired this year to oversee all financial matters and Ericca Long assumed the position of the theater's first full-time assistant to the artistic director.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
What we have in "Tribes," the agitated and absorbing play by Nina Raine receiving its Baltimore premiere at Everyman Theatre, isn't a failure to communicate. It's a stubborn, even proud, refusal to communicate. While four members of a well-educated London family speak over and through one another, wounding and goading as they go, the fifth does what he can to keep up, to fit in, or just stay out of the way. He's Billy, the youngest child, born deaf into a hearing family - not a listening family, mind you, just a hearing one. Billy's parents reason that their son is better off not being defined by his deafness, not being assimilated into the deaf community, which would only make him feel more handicapped.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
When Vincent Lancisi was 6 years old, his father sat the boy on his lap for a serious conversation. "Don't ever go into the music business, Vinny," Ben Lancisi told his youngest son. "You'll never make any money in the entertainment industry. And it's terrible for family life. " The boy loved and admired his father and was determined to follow his advice. So, though he showed talent at the piano and had a pleasing tenor, he didn't pursue a musical career when he grew up. He started his own theater company instead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 29, 1999
Playwright Romulus Linney's "Heathen Valley" -- about the impact of a missionary on a backwoods community in 19th-century North Carolina -- opens at Everyman Theatre tomorrow.Vincent Lancisi directs a cast that features John Benoit, Everyman company members Kyle Prue, Vivienne Shub and Jacqueline Underwood, as well as newcomers Jefferson Russell and Doug Brown, in the role of the missionary determined to convert the mountain people.Show times at Everyman, 1727 N. Charles St., are 8 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays and 2:30 p.m. Sundays, through May 23. Tickets are $12-$15, except for a pay-what-you-can preview tonight and tomorrow's gala opening, which is $25. Call 410-752-2208.
FEATURES
October 17, 2005
Jason Robert Brown, composer of the musical The Last Five Years (extended through Oct. 23 at Everyman Theatre) and a Tony Award winner for Parade, doesn't just write songs for other people to sing. Brown released his first solo album, Wearing Someone Else's Clothes, over the summer, and he will be performing with his band, The Caucasian Rhythm Kings, and guest soloist Lauren Kennedy tonight at Everyman. "An Evening with Jason Robert Brown," at Everyman, 1727 N. Charles St., begins at 6 p.m. with a cocktail reception; the concert is at 7:30 p.m., followed by a question-and-answer session with Brown and a CD signing.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | May 5, 2009
Everyman Theatre announced a 2009-2010 season that bucks a national trend by staging at least one large-cast show, and by increasing the theatrical "extras" available to customers. Highlights of the next subscription season include: * Rabbit Hole, Sept. 9-Oct. 11. The Baltimore premiere of David Lindsey-Abaire's Pulitzer Prize-winning drama is a harrowing look at how the death of a child can pull a family apart. * The Mystery of Irma Vep, Nov. 11-Dec. 13. This satire of penny dreadfuls by playwright Charles Ludlam will feature actor Bruce Nelson.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 22, 2003
Everyman Theatre's 2003-2004 season will emphasize new American voices - along with the theater's first modern European classic, Ibsen's Hedda Gabler. "I really want the fresh voices of the American theater that are high quality to be present in our season at Everyman, and I think when you combine skilled masters like Ibsen with fresh new voices that construct well-written plays, you have the stuff that makes great theater," artistic director Vincent M. Lancisi says of the season, which includes a Baltimore premiere and a recent Pulitzer Prize winner.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 3, 2002
August Wilson's 1987 Pulitzer Prize-winning domestic drama, Fences, begins performances Tuesday at Everyman Theatre. The 1950s installment of Wilson's decade-by-decade chronicle of 20th-century African-American life focuses on the family of a Pittsburgh garbage collector who was a star baseball player in the Negro Leagues. Frederick Strother plays former ballplayer Troy Maxson and Lance Williams portrays his frustrated son, Cory, under the direction of Jennifer Nelson, artistic director of Washington's African Continuum Theatre Company.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Many a play deals with language and communication. There is always theatrical ore to be mined in the way people express themselves - or fail to - and how that can complicate so many things in life. British playwright Nina Raine gives the subject an unusual spin in "Tribes," a 2010 work about a young deaf man named Billy, born into a hearing family full of people who communicate all too crassly or ineptly with one another. This funny and touching play, which Everyman Theatre is staging for its season-closing production, features an actor deeply familiar with its central issues.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2014
Starting next week with its production of Nina Raine's "Tribes," starring deaf actor John McGinty, Everyman Theatre will offer personal handheld closed captioning devices for all performances. In a statement released Wednesday, founding artistic director Vincent Lancisi said that the company, "an early adopter of this new technology," is "committed to embodying the promise of our name - Everyman Theatre. " "For the first time - long overdue - we are able to invest in technology that says to the deaf and hard-of-hearing communities: 'We value you and we want you to be a part of the Everyman family' ... [We]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
Everyman Theatre has been on a roll since the beginning of 2013, when the company inaugurated its inviting new downtown space. The first full season in that venue - there's one more play left, "Tribes," opening May 28 - has been marked by exceptionally effective stagings of diverse works (three were given extra weeks to meet demand). "That's why it took so long to come up with a second season," said Everyman's artistic director, Vincent Lancisi. "I really felt intimidated by the scope of this one. " What Lancisi devised for 2014-2015 is a promising mix of three Baltimore premieres and three vintage plays.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
During a rather frantic Hollywood party one night in 1933, a film director pontificates on the heavily-laden-with-historic-woe type of actors he wants to portray the slaves in his new antebellum epic. A black maid named Vera Stark, eager to get into the movies and determined to catch the director's eye, transforms herself - in less than an instant, it seems - from confident to meek, articulate to mumbling, upright to stooped-over. It's hilarious and pathetic all at once. Portrayed by the compelling Dawn Ursula in Everyman Theatre's production of the 2011 Lynn Nottage play "By the Way, Meet Vera Stark," this stardom-seeking servant understands the game almost too well.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2014
A voice called out, "Cameras ready. " Another voice responded, "Sound. " Then a third: "Action. " With that, the Everyman Theatre Film Studios came to life one recent morning. OK, not a real film studio, but awfully close. An upstairs space at Everyman's Fayette Street building was transformed into a genuine movie-producing facility as part of the process of putting the company's next production onto the stage. "By the Way, Meet Vera Stark," a comic/serious work from 2011 by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Lynn Nottage, is receiving its Baltimore/Washington premiere.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
The well-seasoned, if unsteady, Shakespearean actor known only as "Sir" in Ronald Harwood's 1980 play "The Dresser" has an ego the size of Wales. No surprise there. But he also has enough dependency and self-esteem issues to keep an analyst busy for decades. The wonder is that anyone would put up with, let alone attend to, such a demanding mess of a man. But Norman, who dresses and sees to any other of Sir's backstage needs, has long carried devotion to an extreme. After so many years of doting and enabling, neither man can fully exist without the other.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| February 25, 2014
Tony Foreman of Foreman Wolf will help transform Everyman Theatre into an "Italian festival" of food and wine on April 5 for a fundraising event for the theater. Organizers invite guests to "wander the rooms of our new home to find crudo paired with festive sparking wines, grilled meats and pastas alongside the bold flavors of red wine, Italian pastries, silent and live auctions of food, wine and travel and more!" There will be music from Baltimore's Bosley along with fencing, cabaret, comedy and dancing.
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