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By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 23, 1990
Chevy Chase - The meeting has the makings of an A. M. Homes short story. First, there's the setting: an ersatz 1950s diner in suburbia. Then, the plot: A young author, over hot tea with milk, struggles to make sense of her life and work. The characters: a Southern waiter rhapsodizing about buttermilk, Connie Francis warbling over the jukebox and our funny, articulate protagonist, Amy Homes, who discusses everything from sex to humility to how she published two books and nearly got sued by J. D. Salinger, all before turning 30.Sometimes, truth -- or life -- really is stranger than fiction.
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NEWS
By Alexander E. Hooke | March 21, 2014
Prepared for the next invasion? It will not be led by foreign terrorists or illegal immigrants. This invasion will come in the form of drones - an American specialty. A judge has just ruled that the Federal Aviation Agency cannot ban from public airspace flying robots or pilotless air vehicles owned by commercial enterprises. This decision means drones will no longer be used primarily for war or border patrols. They will soon become part of everyday life. Advocates anticipate a veritable panacea.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Simon and Stephanie Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 30, 1999
RICHARDTON, N.D. -- For this, they pay him?Tom Fricke, long blond hair clipped back in a ponytail, is hanging out.He's hanging out with farmers, with a high school principal, with a manufacturing executive. He orders the 13-ounce prime rib when they do. He matches them, scoop for scoop, at the ice cream counter. He zips about town in his mini-sport-utility vehicle, gabbing with folks every chance he gets.And yes -- although even his parents don't believe it -- all this hanging out is work.
SPORTS
By Zach Helfand, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2012
There was a time before the three heart attacks, before he was effectively paralyzed in the lower half of his left leg, when Army Spc. Stephen Ramsey wouldn't do much on his Georgia farm other than pick cotton and peanuts, and hunt. Actually, he can still remember the first time he went hunting. He watched a commercial on television, turned to his grandfather and told him he wanted to hunt deer. The next day, the two sat silently in the deer stand and, in the glow of the sunrise, they watched turkeys and other small animals move past them until, finally, Ramsey spotted a deer.
TOPIC
By Ernest F. Imhoff | December 31, 2000
IT IS JUST A SMALL family irony, but interesting. The death Dec. 6 of Werner Klemperer, 80, a star in the comedy TV show "Hogan's Heroes," refocused attention on an old controversy over the propriety of deriving humor from a Nazi prisoner-of-war camp, picturing it as a wacky place where fictional bumbling German officers were outwitted each week by their clever American captives. Klemperer played the Nazi prison commander and chief buffoon, Col. Wilhelm Klink. The show ran from 1965 to 1971 and is now seen in reruns.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | November 27, 1995
AMHERST, Mass. -- They migrated to the valley of this New England college town from suburbs and cities and rural spreads in search of a lost America, a simpler place with a small-town rhythm where neighbor depends upon neighbor.Amid tall, narrow houses clustered on a hill, in a community that feels like summer camp grown up, the 80 residents cook together, eat together, play together, share chores, govern themselves by consensus and help raise one another's children.You'll find no fences or driveways or garages.
FEATURES
January 2, 2007
A new comic strip -- F Minus -- makes its debut in The Sun this week. Tony Carrillo's off-kilter look at everyday life replaces FoxTrot Monday through Saturday. Bill Amend, FoxTrot's creator, recently announced that his strip will run only on Sundays, allowing him time to pursue other interests. Look for F Minus today on Page 4C.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1999
Two young brothers fishing at sunset on the Eastern Shore. A fan scrambling for a foul ball at Camden Yards. A woman and her dog dressed up for a pet parade. Unremarkable moments from everyday life -- until they are viewed through a photographer's lens.The images assembled here were chosen by The Sun's photography staff as their favorites of the past year. It's usually the job of the photographers to illustrate someone else's story; here they get a chance to tell their own: how a particular photograph happened, what it meant to them, why it was significant.
NEWS
By Ted Kooser and Ted Kooser,Special to the Sun | June 10, 2007
Poetry can be thought of as an act of persuasion: A poem attempts to bring about some kind of change in its reader, perhaps no more than a moment of clarity amidst the disorder of everyday life. And successful poems not only make use of the meanings and sounds of words, as well as the images those words conjure up. Notice how this little poem by Mississippi poet Robert West makes the very best use of the empty space around it to help convey the nature of its subject. - Ted Kooser "Echo" A lone voice in the right empty space makes its own best company.
EXPLORE
By Matthew Button | December 28, 2011
This is the time of the year when everyone reflects over the year's events and hopes for a better new year. I am no different; looking back, 2011 was a year to be thankful. Dec. 23 marked one year since Kathleen, Madeleine, Jake and I officially moved into our new house. While there are several projects still to be completed, we have been focused on making our house a home. Not just by putting out physical items like artwork, and things like that, but making it a place where the kids feel loved, safe and encouraged to discover the world around them - indoors and out. Since taking up residence, Jake has celebrated his first birthday and is growing into a little boy unlike the baby he was when we moved in. He has learned to walk and is literally running around chasing his big sister and beginning to speak a few words (really, it's more like pointing and making noise, but he does say a few things)
NEWS
January 10, 2010
The Greater Chesapeake and Potomac Region of the American Red Cross is requesting blood donations. Eligible donors can call 800-GIVE-LIFE to schedule an appointment. Platelet donors should call 800-272-2123. Calendar Volunteers needed The organizing committee for Relay for Life needs volunteers. This overnight event June 4-5 is designed to celebrate cancer survivorship and raise money for the American Cancer Society. For information, call Jason Copley at 410-781-4316, e-mail hcrelay@hotmail.
NEWS
By Ericka Blount Danois and Ericka Blount Danois,Special to The Sun | April 6, 2008
Michael Spriggs listens and waits for cars to pass one night at the intersection of Taylor Avenue and Old Harford Road in Parkville. Wearing thick glasses held on by a band, he's a short, slightly chubby, willful 11-year-old who's being told that he must learn to cross the street. Kelly Hamburg, his mobility and orientation coach, is there to guide him. Every day Spriggs' vision gets worse; every day he denies the inevitable - that he will one day be blind. As he steps off the curb, surrendering his trust to Hamburg, he turns his head to the left, and as he comes to the middle of the street, he turns his head to the right.
NEWS
By Ted Kooser and Ted Kooser,Special to the Sun | June 10, 2007
Poetry can be thought of as an act of persuasion: A poem attempts to bring about some kind of change in its reader, perhaps no more than a moment of clarity amidst the disorder of everyday life. And successful poems not only make use of the meanings and sounds of words, as well as the images those words conjure up. Notice how this little poem by Mississippi poet Robert West makes the very best use of the empty space around it to help convey the nature of its subject. - Ted Kooser "Echo" A lone voice in the right empty space makes its own best company.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 19, 2007
Fronting his own band was initially an awkward experience for William Tell. For about five years, the former guitarist for the punk-lite pop group Something Corporate had become accustomed to standing on stage in the shadows, playing his instrument and adding background vocals. But all of that has changed with the release of his solo debut, You Can Hold Me Down. For the past three months or so, the Orange County, Calif., native has been on the road, promoting the record and working through his solo jitters.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | February 18, 2007
At least 17 Howard County organizations and government agencies have agreed people can use more politeness in their home, work and community lives. A new, multiyear project called Choose Civility is pulling numerous local efforts together under one umbrella. Activities include getting book groups to talk about civility at their meetings, telling students to treat each other respectfully in school, helping transit riders remember to be kinder to drivers and encouraging motorists to be more polite to each other.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | January 31, 2007
KENNETT SQUARE, Pa. -- Those immune to Barbaro's mystique looked on in disbelief for the past eight months at the emotion and money being spent on a horse and might well have asked the question Barbaro's surgeon, Dr. Dean Richardson, asked shortly after Barbaro was euthanized Monday. "Was it worth it?" Richardson's answer was that it was, because the Kentucky Derby winner "had many happy days." Yesterday, others not as close to Barbaro had the same positive answer. Barbaro's legacy has a chance to be long-lasting.
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