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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 28, 2007
The American Red Cross dismissed its president and chief executive, Mark W. Everson, yesterday because of his "personal relationship with a subordinate employee." He had been in office for only six months. The news was another blow to an organization that has struggled to overcome criticism of its performance after Hurricane Katrina and other disasters, and it stunned the organization's employees, as well as the nonprofit world at large. "Although this is difficult and disappointing news for the Red Cross community, the organization remains strong and the life-saving mission of the American Red Cross will go forward," Bonnie McElveen-Hunter, chairman of the Red Cross board, said in a statement.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2012
Maryland State Police are investigating the fatal shooting of a Cecil County man. David Everson, 41, of the 100 block of Elk Forrest Road in Elkton died after being shot in an apparent domestic dispute, police said. He was pronounced dead at the scene and his body was taken to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner for an autopsy. Police said Everson's ex-wife called 911 to say Everson had pulled into her driveway on Vanderlyn Drive in Chesapeake City and was beating on the door.
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NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1996
Beverly Everson-Jones, Baltimore Comptroller Joan M. Pratt's recent appointee as city auditor, hasn't held a license as a certified public accountant for 7 1/2 years, which means she cannot officially validate the audits her office conducts of municipal agencies.Everson-Jones, who began work in the $83,300-a-year post in late April, first was licensed as a CPA by Maryland in 1984 and renewed her license two years later, state records show. But she did not renew her license after it expired a second time, on Dec. 31, 1988.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 28, 2007
The American Red Cross dismissed its president and chief executive, Mark W. Everson, yesterday because of his "personal relationship with a subordinate employee." He had been in office for only six months. The news was another blow to an organization that has struggled to overcome criticism of its performance after Hurricane Katrina and other disasters, and it stunned the organization's employees, as well as the nonprofit world at large. "Although this is difficult and disappointing news for the Red Cross community, the organization remains strong and the life-saving mission of the American Red Cross will go forward," Bonnie McElveen-Hunter, chairman of the Red Cross board, said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE and EILEEN AMBROSE,SUN REPORTER | May 16, 2006
The Internal Revenue Service said yesterday that it has revoked or plans to repeal the tax-exempt status of every one of the 41 credit counselors it has audited, saying the nonprofits were largely motivated by profit and failed to provide adequate counseling to debt-laden consumers. Additionally, IRS Commissioner Mark W. Everson said his agency has "criminal investigations under way" of credit counselors, but he would not comment further on the probes. The 41 credit counselors earned more than 40 percent of the industry's $1 billion in annual revenues, Everson said in a telephone conference yesterday.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 25, 2005
WASHINGTON - The Internal Revenue Service said yesterday that it has collected more than $3.2 billion in taxes and penalties from people and companies who participated in a tax shelter known as "Son of Boss." The IRS collected the money under a settlement that required the taxpayers to concede 100 percent of the tax losses they claimed, plus a penalty of 10 percent or 20 percent. "This was a particularly bad shelter, and we're glad so many chose to get right with the government," IRS Commissioner Mark W. Everson said.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2004
More taxpayers say they are willing to cheat, and the Internal Revenue Service is fighting back by hiring more enforcement staff and beefing up audits of high-income individuals, IRS Commissioner Mark W. Everson said yesterday. A survey last year of taxpayers found that 17 percent believed it was OK to cheat on their taxes, up from 11 percent in 1999, Everson said in a telephone conference. (The study was commissioned by the IRS Oversight Board, a group established by Congress to provide the agency with guidance.
SPORTS
By Derek Toney | February 27, 1991
Edmondson advanced to the Maryland Scholastic Association B Conference final with a 78-76 victory over host and No. 19 Forest Park in a semifinal yesterday.The Redskins (13-4) will play Carver in the Metro Classic at the Baltimore Arena on Sunday at 3 p.m. Carver defeated Mervo, 65-48, in the other semifinal.With the score tied at 76, Edmondson's Devin Ross' jumper from 18 feet missed, but Garfield Griffin followed the missed shot, giving Edmondson the lead with three seconds remaining in regulation.
BUSINESS
By THE BOSTON GLOBE | September 26, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Internal Revenue Service is exploring ways to share names, addresses, birth dates, employee records and other taxpayer information with law-enforcement agencies, particularly the Immigration and Naturalization Service, according to legislative aides and senior tax attorneys. Aides said any such move, though taken in the name of national security, could violate the spirit if not the letter of U.S. nondisclosure laws. These privacy rules were first established in the mid-1970s as part of an overhaul of the tax code after the Nixon White House used IRS records to intimidate its enemies.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 21, 2004
April 15 is lurking around the corner, so if you haven't yet filed your federal tax return, it's time to set aside a few hours, gather together your financial records, and flee the country. Or, if you like to "walk on the wild side," you can stay here and attempt to do your taxes. As usual, there are some "new wrinkles" in the tax laws this year, to guard against the danger that some taxpayer, somewhere, will actually understand them. For openers, we have a new Internal Revenue Service commissioner, replacing former Commissioner Charles Rossotti, who, in what the IRS described as a "freak auditing mishap," was eaten by hyenas.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE and EILEEN AMBROSE,SUN REPORTER | May 16, 2006
The Internal Revenue Service said yesterday that it has revoked or plans to repeal the tax-exempt status of every one of the 41 credit counselors it has audited, saying the nonprofits were largely motivated by profit and failed to provide adequate counseling to debt-laden consumers. Additionally, IRS Commissioner Mark W. Everson said his agency has "criminal investigations under way" of credit counselors, but he would not comment further on the probes. The 41 credit counselors earned more than 40 percent of the industry's $1 billion in annual revenues, Everson said in a telephone conference yesterday.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 25, 2005
WASHINGTON - The Internal Revenue Service said yesterday that it has collected more than $3.2 billion in taxes and penalties from people and companies who participated in a tax shelter known as "Son of Boss." The IRS collected the money under a settlement that required the taxpayers to concede 100 percent of the tax losses they claimed, plus a penalty of 10 percent or 20 percent. "This was a particularly bad shelter, and we're glad so many chose to get right with the government," IRS Commissioner Mark W. Everson said.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2005
In an effort to rein in corporate tax-avoidance schemes, the Internal Revenue Service said yesterday that it is offering settlements to 42 companies and about 200 of their executives who it claims channeled hundreds of millions of dollars worth of stock options through improper tax shelters. The IRS did not identify the companies but said they included household names in various industries across the country. With help from their employers, the executives were able to transfer options to family trusts or partnerships that sheltered a total of at least $700 million from taxes.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2004
More taxpayers say they are willing to cheat, and the Internal Revenue Service is fighting back by hiring more enforcement staff and beefing up audits of high-income individuals, IRS Commissioner Mark W. Everson said yesterday. A survey last year of taxpayers found that 17 percent believed it was OK to cheat on their taxes, up from 11 percent in 1999, Everson said in a telephone conference. (The study was commissioned by the IRS Oversight Board, a group established by Congress to provide the agency with guidance.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 21, 2004
April 15 is lurking around the corner, so if you haven't yet filed your federal tax return, it's time to set aside a few hours, gather together your financial records, and flee the country. Or, if you like to "walk on the wild side," you can stay here and attempt to do your taxes. As usual, there are some "new wrinkles" in the tax laws this year, to guard against the danger that some taxpayer, somewhere, will actually understand them. For openers, we have a new Internal Revenue Service commissioner, replacing former Commissioner Charles Rossotti, who, in what the IRS described as a "freak auditing mishap," was eaten by hyenas.
BUSINESS
By THE BOSTON GLOBE | September 26, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Internal Revenue Service is exploring ways to share names, addresses, birth dates, employee records and other taxpayer information with law-enforcement agencies, particularly the Immigration and Naturalization Service, according to legislative aides and senior tax attorneys. Aides said any such move, though taken in the name of national security, could violate the spirit if not the letter of U.S. nondisclosure laws. These privacy rules were first established in the mid-1970s as part of an overhaul of the tax code after the Nixon White House used IRS records to intimidate its enemies.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2005
In an effort to rein in corporate tax-avoidance schemes, the Internal Revenue Service said yesterday that it is offering settlements to 42 companies and about 200 of their executives who it claims channeled hundreds of millions of dollars worth of stock options through improper tax shelters. The IRS did not identify the companies but said they included household names in various industries across the country. With help from their employers, the executives were able to transfer options to family trusts or partnerships that sheltered a total of at least $700 million from taxes.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2012
Maryland State Police are investigating the fatal shooting of a Cecil County man. David Everson, 41, of the 100 block of Elk Forrest Road in Elkton died after being shot in an apparent domestic dispute, police said. He was pronounced dead at the scene and his body was taken to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner for an autopsy. Police said Everson's ex-wife called 911 to say Everson had pulled into her driveway on Vanderlyn Drive in Chesapeake City and was beating on the door.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1996
Beverly Everson-Jones, Baltimore Comptroller Joan M. Pratt's recent appointee as city auditor, hasn't held a license as a certified public accountant for 7 1/2 years, which means she cannot officially validate the audits her office conducts of municipal agencies.Everson-Jones, who began work in the $83,300-a-year post in late April, first was licensed as a CPA by Maryland in 1984 and renewed her license two years later, state records show. But she did not renew her license after it expired a second time, on Dec. 31, 1988.
SPORTS
By Derek Toney | February 27, 1991
Edmondson advanced to the Maryland Scholastic Association B Conference final with a 78-76 victory over host and No. 19 Forest Park in a semifinal yesterday.The Redskins (13-4) will play Carver in the Metro Classic at the Baltimore Arena on Sunday at 3 p.m. Carver defeated Mervo, 65-48, in the other semifinal.With the score tied at 76, Edmondson's Devin Ross' jumper from 18 feet missed, but Garfield Griffin followed the missed shot, giving Edmondson the lead with three seconds remaining in regulation.
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