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By John Dorsey | January 28, 1999
Today, Evergreen House kicks off its first ``Collectors' Series,'' which will be an annual group of exhibitions and programs built around collections assembled by the Garrett family, one-time owners of Evergreen.This year's edition centers on prints, since the house's first Garrett owner, T. Harrison, amassed a collection of 20,000 prints, mostly by old masters, later donated to the Baltimore Museum of Art.From 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. today, an exhibit of contemporary prints titled ``Narratives in Print'' will open with a reception, followed at 7 p.m. by a lecture on ``The Culture of Collecting'' by Maryland State Arts Council folklorist Charles Camp.
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NEWS
December 11, 2008
Navy introduces warship USS Freedom at Academy The U.S. Navy's newest warship, the USS Freedom, will visit the Naval Academy in Annapolis today through Monday during its maiden voyage from the Great Lakes to Norfolk. The ship will be open for public visitation from 12:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. tomorrow, on a first-come, first-serve basis. Visitors may walk through Gate 1 (King George Street) and Gate 3 (Maryland Avenue) and should be prepared to show a government-issued photo identification. Handicapped individuals with proper decals may drive through Gate 1 after a vehicle inspection.
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FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | February 13, 1993
Now on display at Baltimore's Evergreen House, George Washington's lower denture, stained, worn, slightly crooked, makes a homely and fascinating relic of democracy. Imagine the first president grimacing from an ill-fitting set of false teeth while plotting battle strategy, executing a survey map or determining policy for his new-born country.The denture, on loan from the Dr. Samuel D. Harris National Museum of Dentistry in Baltimore, is part of a presidential memorabilia exhibit highlighting the book and manuscript collections of Evergreen House, once the home of John Work Garrett.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | August 27, 2007
When is a house not a house? When it becomes a museum. That's what happened this summer to two historic structures that the Johns Hopkins University owns and operates as public attractions in North Baltimore, the Homewood mansion at 3400 N. Charles St. and Evergreen House at 4545 N. Charles St. No longer are Homewood and Evergreen called the Historic Houses of Johns Hopkins; they're now part of a new campus organization called the Johns Hopkins University...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1999
Jane E. Katz, the retired Evergreen House museum's assistant director, died Tuesday of cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. She was four days short of her 69th birthday.For 30 years, she administered the museum's rare book and paintings collection, rooms of antiques, grounds and private theater of the John Hopkins University-owned 26-acre estate. The complex sits between Notre Dame and Loyola colleges in North Baltimore."Without question, she was the linchpin who brought it and held it together at Evergreen," said Dennis O'Shea, the Hopkins official who oversees the 48-room mansion listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | December 15, 1991
Everybody came to Evergreen House.Except at Christmas.Between foreign ports of call, diplomat John Work Garrett and his wife Alice filled their home, Evergreen House, with friends -- including luminaries in the world of society, politics and the arts.From 1920, when the Garretts inherited the house from his mother, to 1952, when Alice Garrett died, the mighty and the talented came to pay their respects. Conductor Leopold Stowkowski visited, as did violinist Efrem Zimbalist and his wife, soprano Alma Gluck.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | May 28, 2006
FROM A DISTANCE, THE SPOT looks like a small, green bus-stop shelter unaccountably sitting on the banks of a bubbling brook. The closer you get, the odder the scene becomes. Instead of benches inside the structure, a pair of old-fashioned porch swings face each other, as if the place were a setting for a proper Victorian courtship. SCULPTURE AT EVERGREEN / / Through Sept. 24 / / Evergreen House, 4545 N. Charles St. / / Free / / 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, noon-4 p.m. weekends / / 410-516-0341
FEATURES
By Marissa Lowman and Marissa Lowman,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2003
Some artists experience nature. Others make it their own. Tonight, the Evergreen House Museum unveils an exhibit that features landscape artists Mary Woodall and Maggie Thomas, who share a love of the outdoors and of Baltimore and have a different way of looking at both. Woodall, a 27-year-old Baltimore native, is obsessed with the notion that the boundaries we put between ourselves and nature have closed our eyes to the beauty all around us. "The five minutes most people spend outside everyday doesn't click with them," she says.
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | June 2, 1991
In a move that could reduce public access to historic Evergreen House, the Johns Hopkins University will eliminate on July 1 its department of collections.The department has charge of both Evergreen, at 4545 N. Charles St., and Homewood House, which is on the Hopkins campus about one mile south.The move will eliminate the position of the department's director, Susan Tripp, who oversaw the restorations of the two mansions in recent years. Evergreen, a gift to Hopkins from the Garrett family, was reopened last year after a $4.5 million refurbishment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 3, 2005
Perhaps a kindred spirit may some day be found whose ear will catch the melodies from my words." When German poet Wilhelm Muller expressed that wish, not long before he died in 1827 at the age of 34, he did not know just how brilliantly and timelessly it would be granted. Franz Schubert found in Muller's verses just the inspiration he needed to write some of his greatest art songs. A good thing, too. Otherwise, chances are that Muller and his poetry would have slipped forever into obscurity.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | July 14, 2007
The sun has set, and an overhanging canopy of trees blots out the stars. The woods are full of ominous sounds. Dark figures emerge from the shadows. It's hard not to shiver; something wicked this way comes. Oh, if only that were the case. If You Go Macbeth runs through July 22 in the meadow outside Evergreen House, 4545 N. Charles St. $15-$25. Showtimes are 7:30 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays; 5 p.m. Sundays. 410-366-8596 or go to baltimoreshakespeare.org.
NEWS
April 15, 2007
Helen L. Ohrenschall, a homemaker and former teacher, died of a stroke April 6 at Sinai Hospital. She was 81. Helen Louise Williams was born in Baltimore and raised in the city's Brooklyn neighborhood. She was a 1942 graduate of Southern High School and attended the University of Maryland, College Park. After earning a bachelor's degree in English from the Johns Hopkins University's McCoy College in 1946, she taught students with cerebral palsy for several years. She later returned to Hopkins, where she earned a master's degree in English and taught at the University of Baltimore during the 1966 academic year.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,sun reporter | March 12, 2007
Baltimore-trained artist Nestor Topchy put a new spin on Easter eggs at a workshop yesterday that brought participants ranging from children to grandmothers to the Johns Hopkins University's Evergreen House. The eggs were not exclusively the province of Easter, however, but the Ukrainian decorated sort. Topchy had some wooden ones adorned with geometric patterns hanging from his Byzantine gold-leaf icon paintings on display there. Now a resident of Houston, Topchy was a child when he learned pysanky, the ancient egg-painting craft, from his mother -- and both of them shared their knowledge with about 30 people at Evergreen.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2006
Hydroplanes The lowdown -- The 16th annual Thunder on the Narrows hydroplane races take place Saturday and Sunday at the Kent Island Yacht Club. Top speeds range from 85 mph to 150 mph. Part of the proceeds benefit the Hospice of Queen Anne's. If you go -- Gates open at 10 a.m. and racing starts at noon. Admission is $5. Kids younger than 12 get in free. Take exit 41 off Route 50 and park under the Kent Narrows Bridge. Shuttle service will be provided. Call 410-725-6222 or visit kentnarrowsracing.
NEWS
June 20, 2006
Freda M. Grim, a homemaker and volunteer, died of cancer June 10 at her Ten Hills home. She was 82. Freda Speer Malpass was born in Baltimore and raised on Auchentoroly Terrace. She attended Western High School and was a telephone operator during World War II. While attending Babcock Memorial Church and singing in its choir, she met organist Charles Louis Grim. They married in 1947. He later played at St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church, where Mrs. Grim also sang and was a member of the Ladies' Guild.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | May 28, 2006
FROM A DISTANCE, THE SPOT looks like a small, green bus-stop shelter unaccountably sitting on the banks of a bubbling brook. The closer you get, the odder the scene becomes. Instead of benches inside the structure, a pair of old-fashioned porch swings face each other, as if the place were a setting for a proper Victorian courtship. SCULPTURE AT EVERGREEN / / Through Sept. 24 / / Evergreen House, 4545 N. Charles St. / / Free / / 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, noon-4 p.m. weekends / / 410-516-0341
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | June 1, 2000
The artists in a new show at Baltimore's Evergreen House use non-traditional materials to play with our notions of what is natural and what is man-made, often finding surprising juxtapositions. The exhibit, which presents 10 regional artists whose work explores the relationship between art and nature, was curated by the critic and educator Michael Brenson. By its very nature, outdoor sculpture raises questions about that mysterious connection. For instance, John Ruppert creates large, elegant vessel forms from steel and aluminum prison-grade chain-link fence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to the Sun | October 31, 2004
Arts patron Alice Warder Garrett and her husband, John, were so devoted to all things artistic that their North Baltimore estate, Evergreen House, became an early-20th-century mecca for painters, musicians and other people who knew a good party when they saw one. The late John and Alice Garrett doubtless are having a swell time at some heavenly black-tie event, and their book- and-art-filled home is now a Johns Hopkins University-administered house museum....
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 18, 2006
"It's time to say thank you to people who have done so much for the community," says Maryland composer and concert producer Vivian Adelberg Rudow. She has organized a concert this weekend that will honor two guiding lights of the Peggy and Yale Gordon Trust - director Sidney Sherr and assistant director Loraine Bernstein. "Loraine asked me not to do it, but I told her it is not negotiable," Rudow says. "But I promised not to embarrass them. We'll keep it very simple and low-key." Musically, the concert, which will be held Sunday at the Har Sinai Congregation in Owings Mills, is far from simple.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2005
The Today show announced yesterday to its national viewing audience which of four locales had been selected as the Hometown Wedding site for Southern Maryland sweethearts Sarah Raley and Mark Dale. The folks at the Chesapeake Bay Beach Club in Stevensville had been informed a day earlier - under a vow of secrecy - that theirs was the chosen site. "They told us it had to be an absolute surprise," said club owner John Wilson. "They were very firm." Today producers decided to break the news to the club Thursday evening while setting up for yesterday morning's live telecast.
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