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Everglades National Park

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NEWS
February 26, 1996
THE ABUNDANT natural splendor of the Florida Everglades is a unique national heritage that must be protected, not drained and polluted to support agriculture and development that has pushed this fragile ecosystem to the verge of collapse.President Clinton's $1.5 billion plan to reclaim 120,000 acres of farmland bordering Everglades National Park and to re-engineer the compromised network of rivers and lakes in South Florida to increase natural freshwater flow is the most ambitious ecological restoration plan in recent history.
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NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | September 3, 2006
MIAMI -- A year after two bodies were discovered locked in gruesome embrace deep in the marsh, a television documentary attempts to solve a mystery since burned into Everglades lore. Did a giant python really explode after swallowing an alligator? And what ate the snake's head? The National Geographic Explorer show examines what happened last September when a 13-foot Burmese python ate a 6-foot gator in Everglades National Park. The extraordinary encounter was captured in a memorable macabre photo that captivated the public and experts alike, and - for a week, at least - made "alligator-python" among the most Googled phrases on the planet.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun Staff | July 18, 2004
Stolen Water: Saving the Everglades From Its Friends, Foes, and Florida, by W. Hodding Carter. Atria. 288 pages. $24. In 1928, a hurricane raged across the Everglades, sending Lake Okeechobee flooding into West Palm Beach County and killing 2,400 people. In an attempt to tame what many regarded as a savage waterway, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers imported thousands of hardy melaleuca trees from Australia, hoping their roots would stabilize the lake's shores and help to dry out the swamp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun Staff | July 18, 2004
Stolen Water: Saving the Everglades From Its Friends, Foes, and Florida, by W. Hodding Carter. Atria. 288 pages. $24. In 1928, a hurricane raged across the Everglades, sending Lake Okeechobee flooding into West Palm Beach County and killing 2,400 people. In an attempt to tame what many regarded as a savage waterway, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers imported thousands of hardy melaleuca trees from Australia, hoping their roots would stabilize the lake's shores and help to dry out the swamp.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | September 3, 2006
MIAMI -- A year after two bodies were discovered locked in gruesome embrace deep in the marsh, a television documentary attempts to solve a mystery since burned into Everglades lore. Did a giant python really explode after swallowing an alligator? And what ate the snake's head? The National Geographic Explorer show examines what happened last September when a 13-foot Burmese python ate a 6-foot gator in Everglades National Park. The extraordinary encounter was captured in a memorable macabre photo that captivated the public and experts alike, and - for a week, at least - made "alligator-python" among the most Googled phrases on the planet.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton has decided to endorse a huge project to protect the Everglades by spending hundreds of millions of dollars to take farmland out of production and restore a more natural flow of fresh water across Florida's swampy southern half, according to senior administration officials.Environmentalists have been urging such a project for years over intense opposition from the region's sugar cane growers.It would be one of the biggest ecological restoration efforts ever undertaken, the administration officials said.
NEWS
September 6, 2000
FLORIDA'S incomparable Everglades is dying, victim of a century of draining, diking and pumping its freshwater out to sea to make way for farms and urban development. Piecemeal remedies have failed to revive the giant wetlands, so a massive $8 billion federal-state plan aims to restore its natural water flow. But the project needs congressional approval as this session draws to a close; it can't be left to the uncertainties of a new administration and Congress. Absent action, the unique ecosystem will be lost.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | May 10, 1992
Wendy Roth and Michael Tompane drove 32,000 miles and visited 41 states to research "Easy Access to National Parks: The Sierra Club Guide for People with Disabilities," being published this month by Sierra Club Books.The authors went to 37 national parks, plus national historical parks, monuments and parkways, to research the book, which is designed primarily for people with disabilities, but may also be useful for the elderly and families with small children.The book contains specific information about the accessibility of individual facilities within the parks -- whether a trail is paved, for example, or a restroom can be reached by a visitor using a wheelchair.
NEWS
By Teresa Smith and Teresa Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 1998
HOMESTEAD, Fla. -- At Biscayne National Park near Florida's southern tip, silence rules.In this nether world of empty mangrove islands and brackish water, of twisted paths and gnarled roots that branch and splinter like nerve cells, the silence is broken only by the whoosh of a pelican diving for food, or the piercing cry of a startled egret.But the park's quiet may soon give way to the sound of jet planes if Miami-Dade County is allowed to build a commercial airport at an abandoned Air Force base two miles away.
NEWS
May 20, 1998
Marjory Douglas, 1890-1998THE ANGEL of the Everglades will forever remain a part of the unique "river of grass" she chronicled and championed for more than a half-century. The ashes of Marjory Stoneman Douglas will NTC be strewn over the section of Everglades National Park named for her years ago, absorbed by the wild wetlands of saw grass and swamp that is home to subtropical species found nowhere else on earth.Advocate and authority, Mrs. Douglas led the fight to protect the fragile marshland that was once despised as pestilent wasteland to be drained and filled for development.
NEWS
February 26, 1996
THE ABUNDANT natural splendor of the Florida Everglades is a unique national heritage that must be protected, not drained and polluted to support agriculture and development that has pushed this fragile ecosystem to the verge of collapse.President Clinton's $1.5 billion plan to reclaim 120,000 acres of farmland bordering Everglades National Park and to re-engineer the compromised network of rivers and lakes in South Florida to increase natural freshwater flow is the most ambitious ecological restoration plan in recent history.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton has decided to endorse a huge project to protect the Everglades by spending hundreds of millions of dollars to take farmland out of production and restore a more natural flow of fresh water across Florida's swampy southern half, according to senior administration officials.Environmentalists have been urging such a project for years over intense opposition from the region's sugar cane growers.It would be one of the biggest ecological restoration efforts ever undertaken, the administration officials said.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun Staff Writer | December 28, 1994
In 1958, the Baltimore Colts licked the New York Giants for the National Football League title, and Americans licked the 3-cent stamp for the last time as full first-class postage. Or so they thought.Now, 36 years later, the U.S. Postal Service has resurrected the stamp for a limited run.On Jan. 1, at 12:01 a.m., the cost of sending a first-class letter jumps to 32 cents.What happens to the millions of 29-cent stamps left in our desks? A slew of 3-cent stamps -- two billion in all -- have been issued to make up the difference.
NEWS
September 3, 2006
MARYLAND Md. escapes serious damage Remnants of Ernesto were gone by yesterday afternoon, but utility workers and residents in Maryland were busy cleaning up the damage from steady rains and unexpectedly vigorous wind gusts. Tens of thousands of homes remained without power last night. pg 1a HarborView ruling affirmed In a blow to a coalition of Baltimore community leaders who say penthouses atop the Pier Homes at HarborView violate height limits, a city housing officer has affirmed her department's decision to allow the developer to continue building rooftop structures at the luxury waterfront project.
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