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By MIKE HIMOWITZ | July 31, 2008
After writing close to a thousand of these weekly essays, I won't bury the lead on this one: It's my last column for The Sun. There. It was hard to say that out loud, and I spent two nights on a half-dozen elegant openings before I decided to get right to the point. Now I can talk about how much fun it's been, and how much I'll miss all of you. But first, I'll let you in on a secret: I've been faking it all these years. I am not a computer expert, or a nerd, or a techie by training or aptitude.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | July 13, 2008
Now, let's not get all giddy and break out the vintage Louis Roederer Cristal Brut Champagne in order to celebrate the news that oil prices sagged late last week from $141 to $136 a barrel. And I needn't remind you of the awful continuing reality that it still costs over $4 a gallon to fill up the family chariot, and who really knows where and when it'll end? Now, let us return to the thrilling days of yesteryear, when the gasoline panics of the mid-1970s threatened several summer vacation seasons for motorists heading for Ocean City, and led "Mr. Ocean City," the irrepressible and charismatic Mayor Harry William Kelley, to spring into action.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | July 12, 2008
Frank N. Megargee, a former longtime Eastern Shore correspondent for The Evening Sun who was also a poet and an artist, died Wednesday of heart failure at Mallard Landing, a Salisbury retirement community, a day before his 91st birthday. Mr. Megargee, who was born and raised in West Chester, Pa., and attended West Chester State College, began his newspaper career working for a weekly in the late 1930s. During World War II, he served in Army communications and landed at Normandy on D-Day, June 6, 1944.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 8, 2008
Back at the dawn of Baltimore television, when the Sunpapers owned the first station here, a 25-year-old Evening Sun reporter named Jim McManus agreed to work in front of the camera for $65 a week. It was 1947. The station, WMAR-TV, had to fill hours upon hours with original programming. So its crews did remote telecasts, running from the races at Pimlico to supermarket openings to professional wrestling matches at the old Baltimore Coliseum. McManus, a reporter and announcer, didn't care for the pro wrestling assignment.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | April 12, 2008
John M. "Jack" Lemmon, a veteran newspaperman who was the managing editor of The Evening Sun from 1979 to 1991, died of a heart attack yesterday morning at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The longtime Towson resident was 80. Mr. Lemmon, whose newspaper career spanned four decades, was born and raised in Mount Pleasant, Ill., the son of a businessman who admired H.L. Mencken and introduced his young son to the famed Baltimore newspaperman's journalism. After stints as a journalism professor and editing jobs at The Washington Star and The Washington Post, Mr. Lemmon was hired to run The Evening Sun, where decades earlier Mr. Mencken had earned his fame as a reporter and columnist.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | February 23, 2008
John Thornton Starr Sr., a retired engineer and widely published freelance writer, died Tuesday of cancer at an assisted living facility in West Bath, Maine. The longtime Govans resident was 98. Mr. Starr was born in Baltimore and raised in the 2000 block of E. Chase St. He was a 1927 graduate of Polytechnic Institute and earned a bachelor's degree in engineering from the Johns Hopkins University in 1938. He studied under Dr. Abel Wolman at Hopkins, who was then the world's foremost expert on water purification, while earning a master's degree in water resources.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | February 6, 2008
Elise Chisolm, a retired Evening Sun features columnist who wrote humorous family life essays, died of congestive heart failure Monday at the Keswick Multi-Care Center. The former Catonsville resident was 83. Born Elise Townsend in Jackson Heights, N.Y., and raised in Bryn Mawr, Pa., she attended the Baldwin School and was a graduate of Lower Merion High School. She made her social debut in 1940 at the Philadelphia Academy of Music. Family members said she was a child of the Great Depression and did not go to college, but attended the Philadelphia School of Office Training.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | November 24, 2007
W. Clark Gaither and his wife were lingering over cups of post-lunch coffee in the kitchen of their Clarksville farmhouse. It was shortly after noon Nov. 23, 1962. For crew and passengers on board United Flight 297, bound from Newark, N.J., to Atlanta, it was just another routine trip on a brilliant late autumn afternoon. Traveling at 10,000 feet, the plane was preparing for a landing at Washington's National Airport, its only stop on its journey to Atlanta. Air traffic controllers at the Washington Air Route Traffic Control Center and the Washington Approach Control Center radioed reports to Flight 297 that small flocks of large birds had been sighted by other pilots in the area.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun reporter | November 21, 2007
Fifty years ago, the infamous "Baltimore bottleneck" was unplugged. On the day after Thanksgiving in 1957, Gov. Theodore R. McKeldin opened the Baltimore Harbor Tunnel. No more would motorists traveling between Washington and New York or Boston have to inch their way stoplight by stoplight - 51 by one account - through the streets of Baltimore. At the time there were no Beltway and no Interstate 95. The main routes through the city were U.S. 1 and U.S. 40. On a good day, a lucky driver might make the slog through town in 45 minutes.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | August 11, 2007
Sure, it's been hot this week, but not quite as hot as the three-day heat wave that saw temperatures in Baltimore soar to 105 degrees twice between Aug. 6 and Aug. 8, 1918. Eighty-nine summers have passed, and the record still stands as the hottest three-day period in Baltimore. However, what is interesting is how The Sun and The Evening Sun reported the weather crisis. Wartime news from Europe and additions to the swiftly mounting count of the wounded and dead fighting with the American Expeditionary Forces, including many Baltimoreans and Marylanders, pushed the weather story off the front to inside pages.
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