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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | July 23, 2009
Two decades after he successfully lobbied to turn the old U.S. 50 bridge over the Choptank River into a fishing pier, Bill Burton was honored Wednesday when the state named the popular site after him. At the urging of Gov. Martin O'Malley and the Department of Natural Resources, the Board of Public Works approved the measure Wednesday by a unanimous vote. "It overwhelms me to think that they think enough of me to do that," said Burton, 82. "There's a hell of a lot of pride in that." The Board of Public Works also voted Wednesday to rename the Overlook at Green Ridge State Forest after longtime DNR forester Francis Zumbrun.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | June 17, 2009
Spencer Livingston Davidson III, a former Evening Sun reporter who later became an associate editor at Time magazine, died Wednesday of heart failure at St. Francis Hospital in Roslyn, N.Y. He was 85. Mr. Davidson, the son of a newspaperman, was born in Baltimore and raised on 31st Street. His father, who died in 1929, was an assistant managing editor of The Sun. After graduating from McDonogh School in 1942, he served with an Army artillery unit during the Battle of the Bulge and was later a military policeman in Berlin.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | June 7, 2009
Since his death several weeks ago, I've received a number of calls and e-mails from former students of Tom Longstreth, the celebrated St. Paul's School English teacher and coach, who was a much-beloved figure on the school's Brooklandville campus for 41 years. Tom was also my former neighbor and a prolific daily walker who could be seen striding along the streets of Riderwood, ramrod-straight and wearing his trademark khaki pants and blue button-down Oxford cloth shirt. In the warm months, he'd add a crumpled tennis hat to his wardrobe, his only concession to the elements.
NEWS
By a Baltimore Sun staff writer | May 7, 2009
Lucy A. Garvey, the first woman to serve as an assistant state's attorney in Baltimore and who became the first woman appointed to the post of master of chancery for what is now the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, died Sunday of cancer at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. She was 86. Lucy Ann Garvey, the daughter of Irish immigrants from County Clare, was born in Baltimore and raised on South Morley Street in Irvington. Master Garvey was a 1940 honors graduate of Western High School, where she was awarded the Peabody Award.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | April 6, 2009
Seventeen years after he flew the coop, the Oriole bird has returned to The Baltimore Sun. Starting tomorrow, the whimsical cartoon - a stamp-sized favorite of Sun readers during the team's heyday 40 years ago - will regularly grace the sports pages. "Hopefully, in that one inch of space, this classic little Oriole can capture the essence of last night's game," said Mike Ricigliano, the cartoonist who will draw it. Ricigliano's oddball work has appeared in The Sun (and, previously, The Evening Sun)
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | April 5, 2009
The other evening, I was rereading a signed copy of Hamilton Owens' book, Baltimore on the Chesapeake, which he presented to The Sun library in 1941. There is no inscription save a quick "Hamilton Owens" written in black ink in a tight script on the book's flyleaf. I last looked at the book, a whimsical popular history of the city published by Doubleday, Doran & Co. Inc., probably 30 years ago. What prompted me to pick it up again was the death of Hamilton Owens' son, Gwinn F. Owens, at 87, on March 22. Gwinn, who had been a longtime reporter and editor, was the first op-ed page editor of The Evening Sun's "Other Voices" page when it was unveiled in 1979.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 26, 2009
Gwinn F. Owens, a retired editor and editorial writer who made The Evening Sun's op-ed page a popular feature with readers and contributors, died of complications from dementia Sunday at College Manor nursing home in Lutherville. The longtime Ruxton resident was 87. Mr. Owens was born in Seven Oaks, England, the son of James Hamilton Owens, a veteran newspaperman, and Olga Owens, a homemaker and musician. They moved to Lutherville and later Riderwood, where he grew up, when his father was named editor of The Evening Sun in 1922.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 9, 2009
Lydia M. Wells, a homemaker and longtime Stoneleigh resident, died Wednesday at Manor Care Ruxton. She was 91. Lydia Montague Jones, the daughter of a cotton merchant, was born in Charlotte, N.C., and raised in Atlanta. She was educated at a private academy, family members said. In 1937, she married William J. Wells Jr., a reporter and editor for The Sun and The Evening Sun. At the time of his 1973 retirement after a 45-year career with the newspapers, he was senior makeup editor of the evening paper.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 20, 2008
Ramon R. "Ray" Baier, retired chief of the Baltimore Sun's communications room who earned a reputation during a nearly 50-year career for being an unflappable newsroom presence, died Tuesday at Franklin Square Hospital Center after he was stricken with a heart attack at his Essex home. He was 72. Mr. Baier was born in Baltimore and raised in Essex, where he spent the remainder of his life. He attended Kenwood High School until he broke his neck, which left him paralyzed for some time. Forced to drop out of school, Mr. Baier later earned his General Educational Development certificate.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | August 3, 2008
Robert Michael "Pick" Pickering Sr., a retired Evening Sun makeup editor who enjoyed restoring old homes, died of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma Wednesday at University of Maryland Medical Center. The Towson resident was 64. Mr. Pickering was born in Baltimore and raised in Ednor Gardens. "We grew up in the shadow of Memorial Stadium. It was a great place to grow up. We played handball, stickball, half ball and touch football in the back alleys or the streets," said Mike Ward, a childhood friend who is now a certified public accountant and real estate broker.
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