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December 16, 2003
Walter L. Taylor Jr., a former Evening Sun sportswriter who later became an ordained United Methodist Church deacon, died of Alzheimer's disease Wednesday at Charlestown Retirement Community. He was 87. Mr. Taylor was born in Baltimore and raised in Walbrook. He was a 1933 graduate of City College and earned a bachelor's degree in history in 1937 from what was then Western Maryland College. He began his career in 1937 in the sports department of the old News Post, and joined the Evening Sun in 1940.
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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 13, 1995
All I can say is, thank God the pope doesn't hit town till next month. There's been way too much excitement in Charm City, all balled into a couple of weeks, and I think I'm getting angina. First, we had Cal Week, in which all the supernatural forces of the cosmos blew into Baltimore, turned Camden Yards into Olympus, boiled the waters of the Patapsco and silenced all the cicadas. (No exaggeration.)Now, it's Election Week, featuring only the most fascinating and hotly contested city primary in decades.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1996
Paul T. Broderick Sr., who spent his entire 50-year newspaper career at The Evening Sun, died Friday of heart failure at Lorien Nursing Home in Columbia. He was 88 and formerly lived in Catonsville.He held various positions at the paper -- sports reporter, city reporter, photo editor, copy editor, news editor, assistant city editor, city editor -- and was an assistant managing editor when he retired in 1975.When he joined the newspaper, the background music in the newsroom was provided by the noisy tapping of typewriter keys.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2001
Mary Helen "Bebe" Cadwalader, a former Evening Sun and Life magazine journalist who, after her professional career, became a prolific free-lancer and wrote on a variety of subjects, died Thursday of a heart attack at her Harford County home. She was 85. Since 1963, Miss Cadwalader had lived at The Mound, her 140-acre farm in Joppa near the Gunpowder River, which dates from the 18th century. She grew grains, managed a herd of Hereford beef cattle, boarded horses, hunted foxes and, in her spare moments, relaxed with the typewriter.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1997
Alfred Cleveland Haynes, retired music critic for The Evening Sun and former host of a weekly radio program, died Saturday of stroke complications at a hospice in Miami. He was 79.Mr. Haynes, who moved to High Pines, Fla., after his retirement in 1985, had been host of "The World of Operetta" on WBJC-FM from the early 1970s until the early 1980s.A tenor, Mr. Haynes' lifelong interest in operetta began as a youth when he sang with choral groups and choirs in his boyhood home of Grand Rapids, Mich.
NEWS
March 9, 2005
Richard K. Tucker, a former Evening Sun reporter and Korean War correspondent, died in his sleep Saturday at his home in Mansfield, Mass. He was 89. Mr. Tucker was born and raised in Fort Madison, Iowa, and earned a bachelor's degree in journalism in 1936 from the University of Iowa. He was a reporter for the Indianapolis News for six years until joining the Army in 1942, when he joined the staff of Gen. Douglas MacArthur in the Pacific. He also was a witness to the Japanese surrender aboard the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay, family members said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2004
Eveline R. Spicknall, retired secretary to the managing editor of The Evening Sun who combined efficiency with an outgoing friendliness, died of a heart attack Monday at Asbury Methodist Village in Gaithersburg. The former longtime Catonsville resident was 91. She was born Eveline Robinson in Baltimore and was raised there and in Catonsville. After dropping out of high school, she studied shorthand at Strayer's Business College and became a secretary for a construction business. After her 1935 marriage to Charles M. Spicknall, she became a homemaker.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2001
Dudley P. Digges, a former Army intelligence officer and editorial pages editor of The Evening Sun, died of pneumonia Thursday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. Mr. Digges, who lived in Guilford, was 83. He was editor of The Evening Sun editorial pages from 1979 until his retirement in 1981, but from the day he took what he thought was a summer job with the paper in 1948, Mr. Digges produced 33 years of opinions on everything from the affairs of NATO to the dependability of Baltimore bus service.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | May 26, 1995
The 85-year-old Baltimore Evening Sun, once described as "the rollicking son of the staid old lady, the morning Sun," will cease publication Sept. 15, the publisher said yesterday.The evening paper's circulation has fallen by 100,000 copies since 1987, the victim of changing reader habits, the company said. But the loss will be offset by a thorough redesign and expansion of the morning Sun, which has been enjoying strong circulation gains, said Mary Junck, publisher and chief executive officer of The Baltimore Sun Co. "It was an extremely difficult decision to make, although I think many people in the community have expected it for some time," she said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2000
Bayard Webster, a former Evening Sun assistant city editor who later wrote about the curious behavior of animals for the New York Times, died Sunday of heart failure at Heron Point Retirement Community in Chestertown. The former Eutaw Place resident was 82. After eight years as an Evening Sun reporter and editor in the 1950s, he joined the Times, where he was a reporter, assistant metropolitan editor and assistant director of science news. When he retired in 1985, he was a science writer who specialized in wildlife, the environment and animal behavior, writing stories such as "Elephants Have Language Inaudible to Humans" and "Guile and Deception: the Evolution of Animal Courtship."
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