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NEWS
By James M. Merritt | September 13, 1995
I HATE to see The Evening Sun go down. After all, we grew up together. My first attempts at serious reading 80 years ago focused on H. L. Mencken's "Free Lance" column on the Evening Sun's editorial page where he was sharpening the barbs that later pierced the hides of all "mountebanks" (charlatans or frauds) to national acclaim.As a kid I sold The Evening Sun around North and Linden avenues to get movie money. The chap who "owned" the corner would sell me five papers for three cents; so I had to peddle 25 copies to reach my objective.
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NEWS
October 2, 2003
Elsinor Towson Roman, a former Evening Sun secretary who worked for H.L. Mencken, died of congestive heart failure Tuesday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. Mrs. Roman, who was a descendant of Gen. Nathan Towson, a Mexican War hero for whom Towson was named, was 94. She was born and reared Elsinor Towson in Baltimore and graduated in 1927 from Western High School. She worked during the early 1930s as a legal secretary for the Baltimore law firm of Smith, Smith, Cross and Simpson. In 1938, she came to work at The Evening Sun as secretary for three months and worked for Mr. Mencken, who was temporarily serving as the newspaper's editorial page editor.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | December 12, 1991
John M. "Jack" Lemmon announced today that he would retire as managing editor of The Evening Sun at the end of the month.Lemmon, 63, served in the post for 12 years.Lemmon's announcement comes as The Sun and The Evening Sun begin to merge their news staffs.In a memo to the staffs today, John S. Carroll, editor of both newspapers, said: "One of the least happy consequences of our decision to merge the morning and evening news staffs is the diminished role of the evening managing editor."Although Lemmon had planned to work a while longer before retiring, he said, "The changes coming just made that impossible.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks and Dan Rodricks,Sun Columnist | September 15, 1995
"I hate to see the evenin' sun go down."-- W.C. Handy My first deadline assignment for The Evening Sun took me to the old federal courthouse on Calvert Street. It was September 1976. A couple of older, wiser and bearded reporters - they called me "Snookie" - needed help taking notes and filing copy for the late editions. They were covering a big trial. Whose trial? The governor's trial. Right then, right there, I knew Baltimore could not be the sleepy backwater snobby friends in New York and Boston had warned it would be.We covered breaking news at The Evening Sun, and there was plenty of it. We wrote stories at 6 a.m. that were in print by 10, wrote stories at 10 that were in print by noon, wrote stories at 3 that were in print by evening rush.
NEWS
September 15, 1995
A characteristic of The Evening Sun has been the friendly practice of newsroom and editorial staffers and alumni to keep in touch and see one another over the years.A 75th anniversary party drew 700 employees, alumni and guests to Hunt Valley Inn in 1985. Almost 300 alumni and staffers attended a farewell party last Saturday at Center Stage.To give a flavor of current alumni pursuits, here is a somewhat random list of alumni now in other jobs. Our regrets to those not named.Ernie Accorsi: assistant general manager, New York Giants.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | September 15, 1995
So today they make the chalk outline and zip another newspaper into the body bag of American journalism, and everyone's telling me not to take it personally.Look, it's a business decision, they all say. The paper's been losing circulation for years, reading habits have changed, afternoon papers are going the way of running boards on cars, blah, blah, blah.Except the problem is that I worked for this newspaper for 14 years, and at one time it was a damned fine newspaper with a lot of damned fine people working for it, which is why I tend to take this personally.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Fred Rasmussen and Ernest F. Imhoff and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 24, 1998
John Thomas Ward, a retired Evening Sun financial editor whose coverage of the railroads made him one of the pre-eminent reporters of the industry at a key time in its history, died Friday from complications of a stroke at a nursing home in Portland, Ore. He was 99.Mr. Ward, formerly of Baltimore, had moved to Portland in 1993 to be near his sister, Katharine Ascherfeld, who survives him.He spent nearly six decades in the newsroom of The Evening Sun, serving as a war correspondent and then as financial editor for 28 years.
NEWS
By Reviewed by John Ruhran | May 14, 1995
From the Evening Sun75 years ago:"The Best News Stories of 1924," edited by Joseph Anthony and Woodman Merrsion (Small, Maynard).Here are seventy stories taken from the newspapers of 1924 . . . The Baltimore Sun has three . . . Two by Raymond Tompkins entitled "The Democratic Convention Opens" and "Nellie Morse Wins the Preakness," and one by William R. Rhodes. The Evening Sun scores with "The End of a Yellow Peril" from the pen of Robert R. Mill.The collection is full of interests and the stories, for the most part, are of the better class of reporting.
NEWS
December 16, 2003
Walter L. Taylor Jr., a former Evening Sun sportswriter who later became an ordained United Methodist Church deacon, died of Alzheimer's disease Wednesday at Charlestown Retirement Community. He was 87. Mr. Taylor was born in Baltimore and raised in Walbrook. He was a 1933 graduate of City College and earned a bachelor's degree in history in 1937 from what was then Western Maryland College. He began his career in 1937 in the sports department of the old News Post, and joined the Evening Sun in 1940.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | September 15, 1995
The Evening Sun publishes its final editions today, a victim of changing times and failing circulation.During its 85-year lifetime, the Baltimore paper gained a national reputation for the social and political commentary of its most famous alumnus, H. L. Mencken. It won a pair of Pulitzer Prizes and helped launch the careers of many talented journalists, including biographer and author William Manchester, and broadcasters Jim McKay and Louis R. Rukeyser.Lively and irreverent in its heyday, The Evening Sun was created by the morning Sun in 1910 to challenge Baltimore's two afternoon papers, the News and the Star.
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