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By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2010
Art Geiselman, a former Evening Sun reporter who relished catching crooked police officers and exposing squalid conditions at prisons and mental hospitals over a 47-year career in journalism, died Dec. 21 of injuries suffered in a fall at the Copper Ridge residential care home in Sykesville. The York, Pa., native was 85. Mr. Geiselman borrowed a sentiment from David Copperfield to explain his life philosophy, shaped by the accidental death of his father when he was a boy and his first wife's death from illness only a few years after they married.
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NEWS
By Paul McCardell, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
More news came out this week that snowy owls have returned to Maryland. One was captured at BWI and released in late December. I only have found a few mentions in The Baltimore Sun since 1837 of the snowy owl, also called white owls. The Jan. 16, 1844, edition mentions numerous sightings of white owls and the capture of one for a museum. Sightings in Maryland are indeed rare. On Jan. 15, 1985, the Evening Sun ran a photo of a snowy owl that happened to land on The Sunpapers' fourth-floor roof just outside the photo department.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2013
Lou Panos, a heralded journalist and author who covered state and national politics during a career that spanned 67 years, died of complications from heart disease at Johns Hopkins Hospital early Sunday. He was 87. His daughter, Melanie Panos-Ortel, said a lingering heart condition had left her father in a weakened state, and the family had recently transferred him to a palliative-care unit at Hopkins. "His heart has just been tired for some time. He passed away in his sleep," she said Sunday.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2013
Lou Panos, a heralded journalist and author who covered state and national politics during a career that spanned 67 years, died of complications from heart disease at Johns Hopkins Hospital early Sunday. He was 87. His daughter, Melanie Panos-Ortel, said a lingering heart condition had left her father in a weakened state, and the family had recently transferred him to a palliative-care unit at Hopkins. "His heart has just been tired for some time. He passed away in his sleep," she said Sunday.
NEWS
By ERNEST F. IMHOFF | May 17, 1992
Readers seeing the exact same stories in The Sun and then The Evening Sun have been asking for months, "Why don't you just kill The Evening Sun? You're slowly letting it die anyway."The answer: About 133,800 people buy the paper. This is 25,000 fewer than during the same period ending March 30 last year, but too many readers to ignore or to transfer easily to The Sun all at once. When papers fold, many readers just vanish.How did The Baltimore Sun get to this point? In the last two years, advertising and circulation revenues declined.
BUSINESS
By M. Dion Thompson | December 13, 1991
John M. "Jack" Lemmon, managing editor of The Evening Su for the past 12 years, announced his retirement yesterday.Though Mr. Lemmon, 63, gave his official retirement date as Dec. 31, he said yesterday that "as a practical matter, today is my last day."During his tenure as the newspaper's top news executive, The Evening Sun received numerous awards, including a Pulitzer Prize."I think we had some good times. This was a happy place to work. Most of us enjoyed doing what we did," he said. "One of the most exciting things was a good story, having something in the paper that you're proud of."
SPORTS
April 5, 1992
The Baltimore Sun's special section on the closing of Memorial Stadium was named one of the 10 best special sections in the country in the annual Associated Press Sports Editors contest.The Evening Sun was honored as one of the best daily sports sections in the 50,001-175,000 circulation category, and the Sunday Sun sports section earned honorable mention honors in the over-175,000 circulation category.In addition to the section awards, Bill Glauber, Mike Littwin, John Eisenberg and Ross Peddicord of the sports staff were honored.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | September 15, 1995
So today they make the chalk outline and zip another newspaper into the body bag of American journalism, and everyone's telling me not to take it personally.Look, it's a business decision, they all say. The paper's been losing circulation for years, reading habits have changed, afternoon papers are going the way of running boards on cars, blah, blah, blah.Except the problem is that I worked for this newspaper for 14 years, and at one time it was a damned fine newspaper with a lot of damned fine people working for it, which is why I tend to take this personally.
NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | May 27, 1995
The Cleveland Press, which I joined out of college in 1954, was the archetypal powerful newspaper.Many Clevelanders blamed it for whatever they thought wrong with their town, on the ground that it could do anything it wanted, so whatever civic need went unmet must be the Press' fault.It wasn't true, but we weren't going to disabuse them. A lot of what passes for the latest in daily journalism the Press was pioneering. Zoning. White space. Provincialism. Baby talk. Passionate commitment. Sam Sheppard, long before O.J.But the Cleveland Press died in 1982 after several years of losing money.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2005
The column you are reading has a new name - "Back Story" - but its roots go back almost 60 years in Sun history. The story starts in 1946, when Neil H. Swanson, executive editor of the Sunpapers, launched the sepia-toned Sunday Sun Magazine. Swanson laid down the magazine's editorial mission: "Maryland is a fascinating place to live, a place filled with interesting people and chock-full of untold stories." And the first issue, on Jan. 6, 1946, was replete with Maryland stories, photographs and advertising.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
William Jabine II, a former Evening Sun reporter and assistant city editor who later became spokesman for the old State Roads Commission and the Department of Natural Resources, died Wednesday of pneumonia at Catonsville Commons Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. The longtime Annapolis resident was 90. "Bill was a meticulous newsman. He was always checking up on reported facts to make certain they were accurate before he put them in a story," said Helen Delich Bentley, a former newsroom colleague who later became a congresswoman and federal maritime administrator.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2013
John Richard "Dick" Irwin, a tough, accurate veteran police reporter with a heart of gold whose signature Police Blotter became required reading for both crime aficionados and the just plain curious, died Wednesday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center of complications from diabetes. Mr. Irwin, whose career at the News-Post, News American, The Evening Sun and The Baltimore Sun spanned more than 40 years, was 76. "He had the mutual respect of the police. He was an honest man, and he didn't like when people tried to fudge things with him. He believed that the police had to be as transparent as possible, and he was right," said Bill Toohey, former Baltimore County police spokesman.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2013
Robert Keller, The Evening Sun's first metropolitan editor and later executive director of the Greater Baltimore Committee, died May 12 of complications from Crohn's disease at Harbor Hospital. He was 71. The son of a banker and a bookkeeper, Robert Keller was born in Trenton, N.J., and raised in Baltimore's Howard Park neighborhood. He earned his high school diploma and bachelor's degree in 1963 from St. Mary's Seminary & University in Roland Park. Mr. Keller was a reporter for The Catholic Review from 1963 until 1965, when he joined the staff of the Delmarva Dialog in Wilmington, Del. In 1967, he joined The Evening Sun as a reporter and in 1972 became city editor.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2012
Paul B. Moore, a former Evening Sun reporter and editor who later became a public relations executive, died Nov. 27 from complications of prostate cancer at his Homeland residence. He was 84. "Paul was a very conscientious reporter and a very conscientious person. He was very talented and what he did, he did well," said Helen Delich Bentley, a former newsroom colleague who later became a congresswoman and federal maritime commissioner. "As a reporter, he was always fair, and wherever he went always looked for something interesting and challenging," said Mrs. Bentley.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
Christopher Gaul, former managing editor of the Catholic Review and reporter for The Sun and The Evening Sun and area television stations, died of lung cancer Thursday at his home in Essex. He was 72. He joined the Catholic Review as a writer in 1995 and worked there until he retired in 2005. George P. Matysek Jr., the Review's assistant managing editor, remembered Mr. Gaul as a mentor to the junior writers at the paper, taking time to carefully edit their work. "He really showed us what went into a good story," Mr. Matysek said, "He was very nurturing in how he dealt with younger writers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2012
Patricia P. Ritter, a former Evening Sun reporter who later became a Life magazine staff writer, died Aug. 20 of pneumonia at the Atria assisted-living community in Kennebunk, Maine. The Baltimore native was 83. The daughter of a former president of United States Fidelity and Guaranty Co. and a homemaker, Patricia Phillips was raised on Northway in Guilford. She attended Calvert School and graduated in 1947 from Bryn Mawr School. She earned a bachelor's degree in 1951 from Wheaton College in Norton, Mass.
NEWS
September 15, 1995
"Let us confess it to one another, Baltimore is a good old town," announced H. L. Mencken on April 18, 1910, in a short comment in the very first edition of The Evening Sun.As The Evening Sun goes to press for the last time today, we continue to marvel at the good old town that molded this newspaper. Whatever distinction The Evening Sun holds in newspaper history it shares with the city that nourished it. Baltimore gave this paper 85 years of daily headlines and, more important, its unmistakable character and its distinctive flair.
NEWS
By Gwen Ifill, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
I believe to this day that I accepted the job I was offered at the Evening Sun in 1981 because of the Bromo Seltzer clock. The route from the airport took us right past the downtown tower that (at the time) still defined the Charm City skyline, and I was immediately taken by it. It was retro. It was kitschy. And it seemed real. Just like Baltimore in 1981. Although I'd come to town for an interview at the morning paper, Bob Keller, then the editor of the afternoon paper, was clever enough to snatch me up at the airport.
NEWS
By Brian Rogers, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
My first memories of The Baltimore Sun go back to 1982, when my wife and I were planning to move to Baltimore from Massachusetts. In the days before the Internet, home buyers turned to The Sun 's classified ads to get their arms around the range of housing alternatives. Thirty years ago was not only a time when The Sun 's real estate section was the go-to source for home listings, but it was also a time of low-teens mortgage rates and a housing crisis (albeit not quite as bad as our most recent crisis)
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