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Evelyn Waugh

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By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,Special to The Sun | April 16, 1995
"Evelyn Waugh: A Biography," by Selina Hastings. Illustrated. 724 pages. Boston: Houghton Miffin. $40In old age Evelyn Waugh was the perfect picture of the snobbish English squire. Dressed in tweeds and smoking a fat cigar, he would shuffle through his big house in the country mumbling nasty remarks about the Welfare State, the Classless Society, and the Ugly American. As he admitted to one of his titled friends, he was "sour & crusty."After his death in 1966, the publication of his letters and diaries revealed the enormous depth of his misanthropy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | August 24, 2003
Evelyn Waugh: Black Mischief, Scoop, The Loved One, The Ordeal of Gilbert Pinfold. Everyman's Library/Knopf, 688 pages, $25. In an era -- at least in the United States -- that has obliterated the line between extreme parody and witness reality, supreme satire may offer the only hope for sanity. Few writers in the English language have matched Waugh in that pratice. Here in the latest of the superbly manufactured Everyman editions, celebrating the 100th anniversary of Waugh's birth, are four of his finest novels.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | August 24, 2003
Evelyn Waugh: Black Mischief, Scoop, The Loved One, The Ordeal of Gilbert Pinfold. Everyman's Library/Knopf, 688 pages, $25. In an era -- at least in the United States -- that has obliterated the line between extreme parody and witness reality, supreme satire may offer the only hope for sanity. Few writers in the English language have matched Waugh in that pratice. Here in the latest of the superbly manufactured Everyman editions, celebrating the 100th anniversary of Waugh's birth, are four of his finest novels.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John E. McIntyre and John E. McIntyre,Sun Staff | June 1, 2003
Out in my garage, not yet destroyed by damp, insects and rodents, are cartons of letters. Letters from old loves, letters from deceased relatives, letters marking the slow attenuation of friendships. Kept closer to hand are a few other letters, one from a dying friend, written at the edge of the grave, urging me to write the substantial work she is sure I carry within me, one from a friend treasuring the 30 years of our acquaintance. When I am gathered to my ancestors, the cartons will wind up at the curb, but I cannot bear to let go of them.
FEATURES
By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,Special to the sun | August 30, 1998
For sheer nonsense you can't beat the frequent cry tha "literary fiction is dead." Trendy magazines love telling us that glitzy blockbusters are taking over the book world, and that no publisher wants "mid-list" authors of "serious novels." Yet, month after month, the serious stuff keeps flowing into the book superstores and the cappuccino clientele gobble it up.In fact, some works that might once have fallen into a "highbrow" limbo have taken off on the wings of the superstores and become best sellers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 18, 1994
Suddenly, it's raining Hugh Grant. He's everywhere. The dashing Brit is in "Sirens," which opens next week, in Roman Polanski's "Bitter Moon," which opens next month, and he was just in "The Remains of the Day." But it's "Four Weddings and a Funeral," which opens today at the Rotunda, that should make him a star, for it's the first of his films to really push his gifts to the forefront.He's so adorable it's almost impossible not to either want to sleep with him or to be him. (I'd choose the being, thank you very much.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John E. McIntyre and John E. McIntyre,Sun Staff | June 1, 2003
Out in my garage, not yet destroyed by damp, insects and rodents, are cartons of letters. Letters from old loves, letters from deceased relatives, letters marking the slow attenuation of friendships. Kept closer to hand are a few other letters, one from a dying friend, written at the edge of the grave, urging me to write the substantial work she is sure I carry within me, one from a friend treasuring the 30 years of our acquaintance. When I am gathered to my ancestors, the cartons will wind up at the curb, but I cannot bear to let go of them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Sun Staff | July 23, 2000
And away we go . . . Three days ago, my 17-year-old son and I left Baltimore for a 10,000-mile journey through America. Up, down and sideways we will go, in a counter-clockwise road trip from coast to coast, Great Lakes to Gulf. This morning, we should be in Cincinnati. By midnight, the St. Louis Arch should be in view. We are making the trip in a 1999 Volkswagen Beetle with a five-speed stick that Jake learned to drive for the expedition. The trunk is packed with clothes and books, dry cereal and peanut butter.
NEWS
August 19, 2007
LORD WILLIAM DEEDES, 94 Journalist and politician Lord William Deedes, a vaunted British journalist and former politician and close friend of former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, died Friday, the Telegraph Media Group said. His friend, author Evelyn Waugh, used him as the inspiration for William Boot, the naive reporter in the novel Scoop. Lord Deedes edited the Daily Telegraph newspaper for 12 years and served as a Conservative lawmaker for 24 years. He was still writing regular columns up until his death, which followed a short illness.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 1, 1994
LONDON -- Sir Harold Acton, a scholar, poet and historian who was legendary as the consummate esthete of his generation, died on Sunday at his family's Renaissance villa on a hillside overlooking Florence, Italy. He was 89.He had been in frail health for some time, friends said.A son of Sir Arthur Acton, who came from a family of Shropshire baronets, and of Hortense Mitchell, a wealthy American, Sir Harold wrote more than a score of books, ranging from novels to memoirs, biographies and essays on Chinese poetry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Sun Staff | July 23, 2000
And away we go . . . Three days ago, my 17-year-old son and I left Baltimore for a 10,000-mile journey through America. Up, down and sideways we will go, in a counter-clockwise road trip from coast to coast, Great Lakes to Gulf. This morning, we should be in Cincinnati. By midnight, the St. Louis Arch should be in view. We are making the trip in a 1999 Volkswagen Beetle with a five-speed stick that Jake learned to drive for the expedition. The trunk is packed with clothes and books, dry cereal and peanut butter.
FEATURES
By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,Special to the sun | August 30, 1998
For sheer nonsense you can't beat the frequent cry tha "literary fiction is dead." Trendy magazines love telling us that glitzy blockbusters are taking over the book world, and that no publisher wants "mid-list" authors of "serious novels." Yet, month after month, the serious stuff keeps flowing into the book superstores and the cappuccino clientele gobble it up.In fact, some works that might once have fallen into a "highbrow" limbo have taken off on the wings of the superstores and become best sellers.
NEWS
By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,Special to The Sun | April 16, 1995
"Evelyn Waugh: A Biography," by Selina Hastings. Illustrated. 724 pages. Boston: Houghton Miffin. $40In old age Evelyn Waugh was the perfect picture of the snobbish English squire. Dressed in tweeds and smoking a fat cigar, he would shuffle through his big house in the country mumbling nasty remarks about the Welfare State, the Classless Society, and the Ugly American. As he admitted to one of his titled friends, he was "sour & crusty."After his death in 1966, the publication of his letters and diaries revealed the enormous depth of his misanthropy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 18, 1994
Suddenly, it's raining Hugh Grant. He's everywhere. The dashing Brit is in "Sirens," which opens next week, in Roman Polanski's "Bitter Moon," which opens next month, and he was just in "The Remains of the Day." But it's "Four Weddings and a Funeral," which opens today at the Rotunda, that should make him a star, for it's the first of his films to really push his gifts to the forefront.He's so adorable it's almost impossible not to either want to sleep with him or to be him. (I'd choose the being, thank you very much.
NEWS
December 24, 1992
Here are some of the books available on tape at the Carroll County Public Library branches.These books were recommended by Jacqueline Adams, materials management coordinator.Ms. Adams also writes reviews for AudioFile magazine, which is devoted to books on tape."Brideshead Revisited," by Evelyn Waugh, read by Jeremy Irons, who also starred in the PBS series based on the book."For the Sake of Elena," a mystery by Elizabeth George, read by Derek Jacobi"It Doesn't Take a Hero," the autobiography of General H. Norman Schwarzkopf, who reads his book on tape.
NEWS
November 14, 2011
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar — another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: NUGATORY Nothing to do with nougat. Nothing to do with anything significant or important, either. The word (pronounced NOO-guh-tor-ee) means trifling, of no importance or value, ineffectual, useless, futile. It is an anglicization of the late Latin nugatorius , which derives from nugari , "to trifle," and nugae , "jests.
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