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By KATE SHATZKIN | November 24, 2008
Want to save a few calories at Thanksgiving? You can save 9 grams of fat, including 7 grams saturated fat, for every 1/4 cup of whipped cream you dole out on that pie - if you've whipped evaporated milk sweetened with powdered sugar and vanilla instead. You'll also cut 75 calories. You can find instructions on how to use evaporated milk as a whipped cream substitute, and how to make it stay "whipped" up to 30 minutes, at verybestbaking.com. Whipped heavy cream (without sugar) Per 1/4 cup: 100 calories 0 grams protein 10 grams fat 8 grams saturated fat 0 grams carbohydrate 0 grams fiber 40 milligrams cholesterol 10 milligrams sodium Whipped topping with evaporated milk, powdered sugar and vanilla Per 1/4 cup: 25 calories 3 grams protein 1 gram fat 1 gram saturated fat 3 grams carbohydrate 0 grams fiber 5 milligrams cholesterol 15 milligrams sodium Nutritional analysis for heavy cream from package, based on doubled volume when whipped, and for evaporated milk recipe from verybestbaking.
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NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN | November 24, 2008
Want to save a few calories at Thanksgiving? You can save 9 grams of fat, including 7 grams saturated fat, for every 1/4 cup of whipped cream you dole out on that pie - if you've whipped evaporated milk sweetened with powdered sugar and vanilla instead. You'll also cut 75 calories. You can find instructions on how to use evaporated milk as a whipped cream substitute, and how to make it stay "whipped" up to 30 minutes, at verybestbaking.com. Whipped heavy cream (without sugar) Per 1/4 cup: 100 calories 0 grams protein 10 grams fat 8 grams saturated fat 0 grams carbohydrate 0 grams fiber 40 milligrams cholesterol 10 milligrams sodium Whipped topping with evaporated milk, powdered sugar and vanilla Per 1/4 cup: 25 calories 3 grams protein 1 gram fat 1 gram saturated fat 3 grams carbohydrate 0 grams fiber 5 milligrams cholesterol 15 milligrams sodium Nutritional analysis for heavy cream from package, based on doubled volume when whipped, and for evaporated milk recipe from verybestbaking.
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FEATURES
By Kim Pierce | September 27, 1992
In the fat-phobic '90s, evaporated skimmed milk is scaling peaks once reserved for cream.The canned product adds the richness of cream to soups, sauces and desserts, with almost none of the fat. Because half the water is removed, or evaporated, the consistency of evaporated skimmed milk more resembles regular whole milk.And evaporated skimmed milk does something whole milk doesn't.It whips like cream, "with peaks and everything," says Jeanne Jones, whose new book is "Eating Smart: The ABC's of the New Food Literacy" (Macmillan, $17)
NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | April 23, 2008
I have several recipes, mostly frostings and casseroles, that call for heavy or whipping cream. Can I substitute canned milk? Cream spoils before I can use it all. The answer would be a resounding "maybe." First, remember that there are two kinds of canned milk. Sweetened condensed milk has had about 60 percent of the water removed and a lot of sugar added. It has a distinctive taste and texture, and should be used only in recipes that call for it. Evaporated milk has been heated to remove about 60 percent of the water; it's available in whole, low-fat and nonfat varieties.
NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | April 23, 2008
I have several recipes, mostly frostings and casseroles, that call for heavy or whipping cream. Can I substitute canned milk? Cream spoils before I can use it all. The answer would be a resounding "maybe." First, remember that there are two kinds of canned milk. Sweetened condensed milk has had about 60 percent of the water removed and a lot of sugar added. It has a distinctive taste and texture, and should be used only in recipes that call for it. Evaporated milk has been heated to remove about 60 percent of the water; it's available in whole, low-fat and nonfat varieties.
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | January 27, 2002
If your dessert choices are either vanilla or chocolate, it's time to discover the old-fashioned goodness of butterscotch. It's possible you haven't tasted its rich, deep flavor in years. Unfortunately, butterscotch isn't a trendy taste right now. But once you taste the mellow combination of butter, brown sugar and milk, butterscotch will become a favorite. You can dress butterscotch up or down. The most simple, and perhaps most comforting, dessert is plain pudding. If that's too spare, try butterscotch over a store-bought coffee cake, apple cake or pound cake.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2000
Stacey Randolph of Nanty Glo, Pa., remembers making Brown-Sugar Drop cookies in her eighth grade home-economics class, "and they had a glaze on them. I can't find the recipe and I want to share them with my family," she wrote. Her answer came from Nancy Barna of Delmont, Pa., who calls the cookie Jubilee Jumbles. She wrote: "Here is the recipe that I think Stacey Randolph is looking for. We also made these in eighth-grade home-economics class. I have used this recipe for over 30 years."
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 2, 2005
The long, cold nights of winter are made for comforting soups like my mother's corn chowder. She had clipped the recipe out of a woman's magazine some 40 years ago. The recipe epitomizes the convenience-driven attitude of the era: Nearly everything comes out of a can. Yet the chowder tastes home-cooked and makes a wonderfully affordable one-dish meal. While this recipe calls for hot dogs, you can gussy up the chowder by using a commercially available gourmet sausage, either chicken, turkey or duck.
FEATURES
By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE | April 2, 1997
If you want to cut fat and empty calories, start by flagging most of the recipes in your collection that call for melted butter.You can greatly reduce the amount of butter -- or eliminate it altogether -- in most savory dishes without damaging the flavor. Jan Arney of Boulder, Colo., sent in a recipe for Parmesan chicken and asked for help in reducing the fat and calories. We shaved off 264 calories and 26 grams of fat by omitting the butter and making a few other changes.The new recipe also halved the amount of salt.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | December 19, 1990
Avoid the last minute Christmas-shopping panic and whip up some of these easy gifts.Here's the ultimate fast and easy gift. Buy good quality shortbread or other plain cookies, an eight-ounce package of chocolate morsels and about two cups finely chopped nuts.Melt chocolate, a little at a time, in the microwave or in a double boiler. Dip one edge of the cookies in the chocolate and then in the chopped nuts. Let sit on wax paper until hardened. Store at room temperature until hardened.These quick and easy liqueurs are deliciously simple.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | February 14, 2007
Adrienne Galvez of Kelso, Wash., was looking for a recipe she had lost for a rice pudding that was made in a slow cooker. Norman Blakely of Fayetteville, N.C., submitted a recipe for rice pudding that he found in a Rival Crock-Pot slow-cooker cookbook. As with most rice puddings, this recipe calls for cooked rice to be added to milk and eggs. The flavorings are also traditional - nutmeg, vanilla and raisins. As instructed, I put everything in the slow cooker and forgot about it for a few hours.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | August 2, 2006
Cold fish may be a pejorative term when applied to a person, but to a pretty piece of summer salmon, simmered gently in aromatic liquid and chilled for serving, it's actually a compliment. Poaching is an easy, low-fat treatment for any kind of fish in hot weather. Though this method does involve some cooking, the fish can be prepared hours ahead - perhaps at a cooler time of day - and served cold with a refreshing salad or vegetables. If you need your fish in a hurry, poaching works, too. Poaching also invites experimentation.
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 2, 2005
The long, cold nights of winter are made for comforting soups like my mother's corn chowder. She had clipped the recipe out of a woman's magazine some 40 years ago. The recipe epitomizes the convenience-driven attitude of the era: Nearly everything comes out of a can. Yet the chowder tastes home-cooked and makes a wonderfully affordable one-dish meal. While this recipe calls for hot dogs, you can gussy up the chowder by using a commercially available gourmet sausage, either chicken, turkey or duck.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2003
Michelle Pennington of Centralia, Ill., wrote: "The recipe I would like to request combines a soft, buttery caramel wrapped around a marshmallow creme filling. The candies were rectangular in shape and wrapped in wax paper that was twisted at the ends. I bought these candies for years but can't find anything similar now." Valerie Lowery of Louisville, Ky., responded. "This referenced request caught my eye as it is near and dear to my heart, being from Louisville, Ky., the birthplace of the Modjeskas, the candy I believe Michelle Pennington is looking for. It is usually placed in the limelight at the time of the Kentucky Derby Festival.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2003
Who could imagine that a cookbook published by a group of nutritionists would have such fat- and calorie-laden recipes as Smith Island Cake (with a whole box of powdered sugar) or Eastern Shore Oyster Fritters fried in oil? But the members of the Maryland Dietetic Association, who produced Explore the Tastes of Maryland From the Mountains to the Sea (Favorite Recipes Press, 2002, $19.95) explain in the book's introduction their philosophy: "All foods can fit." So this book of nearly 200 recipes focuses on the many flavors of Maryland cuisine without too much concern for fat and calories.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2003
Anne O'Neill of Bel Air requested a French chocolate coffeecake recipe. She wrote, "It had yeast, melted chocolate chips and cinnamon. The dough was rolled out jellyroll style, filled with chocolate and put in a tube pan and covered with a crumbly topping. I'd love to find this lost recipe." Beverly Kohn of Owings Mills responded. "Enclosed is the recipe I think Anne O'Neill is looking for. It was in House & Gardens magazine in April 1971. I have made it many times, and sometimes I use cinnamon and brown sugar and butter instead of the chocolate chips.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | August 2, 2006
Cold fish may be a pejorative term when applied to a person, but to a pretty piece of summer salmon, simmered gently in aromatic liquid and chilled for serving, it's actually a compliment. Poaching is an easy, low-fat treatment for any kind of fish in hot weather. Though this method does involve some cooking, the fish can be prepared hours ahead - perhaps at a cooler time of day - and served cold with a refreshing salad or vegetables. If you need your fish in a hurry, poaching works, too. Poaching also invites experimentation.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2002
Jody Chrz of Bend, Ore., requested a recipe for no-bake fruitcake. She lost her recipe but remembers it had fruit, orange slices, evaporated milk, graham-cracker crumbs and more. Mona Ehrlich of Columbia responded with tester Laura Reiley's choice. No-Bake Fruitcake Makes one 2 1/2 -pound fruitcake, serving 12 1/2 cup Pet evaporated milk 3 tablespoons orange juice or orange liqueur 16 finely cut marshmallows 3 1/2 cups very fine graham-cracker crumbs 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg 1/8 teaspoon cloves 1/4 cup raisins 3/4 cup chopped, seeded dates 3/4 cup nuts 1/4 cup candied pineapple 1/3 cup candied cherries 2 tablespoons candied orange peel In a small bowl, combine evaporated milk, orange juice and marshmallows.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2002
Jody Chrz of Bend, Ore., requested a recipe for no-bake fruitcake. She lost her recipe but remembers it had fruit, orange slices, evaporated milk, graham-cracker crumbs and more. Mona Ehrlich of Columbia responded with tester Laura Reiley's choice. No-Bake Fruitcake Makes one 2 1/2 -pound fruitcake, serving 12 1/2 cup Pet evaporated milk 3 tablespoons orange juice or orange liqueur 16 finely cut marshmallows 3 1/2 cups very fine graham-cracker crumbs 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg 1/8 teaspoon cloves 1/4 cup raisins 3/4 cup chopped, seeded dates 3/4 cup nuts 1/4 cup candied pineapple 1/3 cup candied cherries 2 tablespoons candied orange peel In a small bowl, combine evaporated milk, orange juice and marshmallows.
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | January 27, 2002
If your dessert choices are either vanilla or chocolate, it's time to discover the old-fashioned goodness of butterscotch. It's possible you haven't tasted its rich, deep flavor in years. Unfortunately, butterscotch isn't a trendy taste right now. But once you taste the mellow combination of butter, brown sugar and milk, butterscotch will become a favorite. You can dress butterscotch up or down. The most simple, and perhaps most comforting, dessert is plain pudding. If that's too spare, try butterscotch over a store-bought coffee cake, apple cake or pound cake.
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