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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 8, 1998
For 40 days last year, Linda Creager prepared dinner and sat down with her two sons at the table, but ate nothing.For 40 consecutive days she fasted, swallowing nothing but liquids. Creager says she was not on a diet, but on a religious mission, to find guidance from God."After four or five days, I didn't even want food," said Creager, a church outreach worker in Birmingham, Ala. "I could really see how great it's going to be when we don't have to eat anymore, when we get to heaven."Thousands of evangelical Christians, hopeful that the nation is on the threshold of a huge spiritual revival, have taken to preparing by fasting and praying, on their own and in large groups.
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NEWS
March 15, 2012
As the senior pastor of the church in closest proximity to Glen Burnie High School and the March 13 protest by the Westboro Baptist Church, I would like the public to be aware of our position. While recognizing the constitutional right of every American to express themselves, I do not agree with nor appreciate the abuse of that right by the Westboro group. They are not a church by any biblical definition, nor do they reflect the spirit and message of Jesus. Theirs appears to be a self-aggrandizing movement whose purpose is achieved through media attention.
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2003
In an uneasy alliance with an ally of Israel, a national Jewish group is calling for closer ties with Christian evangelicals, who have long supported the Jewish state. The Jewish Council for Public Affairs, concluding a four-day national meeting here yesterday, called on Jewish communities to engage evangelicals to work jointly on issues of mutual interest. That includes support for Israel, religious accommodation in the workplace, social services and a movement to pass legislation protecting the rights of religious organizations.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun reporter | February 13, 2008
NORFOLK, Va. -- SuAnne Bryant is a self-described conservative - a "religious values" voter who opposes early withdrawal from Iraq. Yesterday, she voted for Barack Obama. "It's not so much a vote for him. It's a vote against Hillary," said Bryant, 40, who, like all voters in Virginia, could participate in either party's primary. Obama and Hillary Clinton, the two Democratic senators, are their party's presidential candidates. Bryant and other conservatives in this region of southeastern Virginia - known for its large concentrations of evangelical Christians - described themselves yesterday as a movement without a candidate, or at least a candidate who could win. For many, the choice in 2000 and 2004 was clear - George W. Bush.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1999
A man falls prostrate on the carpeted church aisle, his body convulsing as he is wracked with sobs. Next to him, a woman sits, her head tilted back, tears streaming down her face. Across the sanctuary, a mother leans forward in a pew and weeps, impervious to her daughter playing with a doll at her side.It is revival night at the Rock Church of Baltimore, and the spirit is in the house.For the past two years, people have been coming to this church on a hill in Towson to experience what worshipers describe as a profound presence of God, an experience accompanied by fits of weeping and falling to the floor.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2000
The common stereotype about evangelical Christians: They're poor or blue collar, white, less educated and from the rural South. But recent research is challenging that image. It shows that born-again Christians are increasingly well-educated, well-off and from a variety of cultural backgrounds, perhaps most surprisingly, Asian-American. The latest survey, by California-based Barna Research, a Christian polling firm, compared data on evangelicals today and a decade ago and found: In 1991, 13 percent of born-again adults came from households earning $60,000 or more a year.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1999
The dreaded millennium bug, the so-called Y2K problem that could cause the world's computers to go haywire, might cause widespread inconvenience, but it's not like it's the end of the world.Well, maybe it is.A vocal minority of evangelical Christians believe that Jan. 1, 2000, will unleash an unprecedented crisis that will result in God's judgment on a sinful world. Some of the most extreme believe it could usher in the Apocalypse, the biblical prophecy of the end of time and the second coming of Christ.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2000
Super Bowl Sunday is a great time for raucous parties, rabid fans, ravenous appetites -- and religious conversion. That's why hundreds of evangelical Christians across the country will be throwing Super Bowl parties to reach out to what they call "the unchurched." In its seventh year, organizers of the Super Bowl Outreach say that more than 45,000 people nationwide have committed their lives to Christ since the parties began in 1993. "The folks you're going to get for these parties are folks who don't usually go to church, who aren't Christian, but might be open to the idea," said the Rev. Thurman Williams, who has thrown Super Bowl parties at Faith Christian Fellowship Church in Waverly.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2004
In one of the election's more surprising twists, voters told interviewers Tuesday the most important issue in the presidential race was not the Iraq war, the economy or terrorism, but moral values. According to an exit poll conducted for major media organizations, 22 percent of voters ranked moral values as the top issue. And of those people, almost four out of five voted for President Bush, suggesting that religious faith may have played a more important role in this race than most had predicted.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1998
As night falls and trick-or-treating children transform into ghosts, goblins, witches and monsters, some families will opt for costumes with a more biblical bent.For evangelical Christians, Halloween has become the holiday to shun.Some ignore it altogether, but increasingly churches are offering alternative celebrations to a day they believe encourages witchcraft, Satanism and the occult."Halloween has been exploited and commercialized so that devils and witches and ghosts have become the predominant theme, and we want to do something more positive," said the Rev. Leah White, administrator of New Psalmist Christian School, where an Octoberfest celebration was held yesterday.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN REPORTER | December 6, 2007
When Mitt Romney speaks on religion tonight, it is people like the Rev. Jason Poling he is going to have to reach. Though he has de-emphasized politics since becoming pastor of the evangelical New Hope Community Church in Pikesville five years ago, Poling has been an active Republican for much of his life. And he has a major problem with the former Massachusetts governor now running for that party's presidential nomination: Romney is a Mormon. "Mormonism is not a Christian religion," Poling says succinctly.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Reporter | September 23, 2007
Religious leaders in Maryland are sharply divided on the question of same-sex marriage, a fact that is likely to weigh heavily in an anticipated debate on the issue this winter in the General Assembly. Religious leaders bring podiums, votes and organizations to a hot-button issue that is both religious and political. When the Maryland Court of Appeals rejected same-sex marriage in a 4-3 ruling last week, "friend of the court" legal briefs from religious groups were among the stacks of material urging support for each side.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporter | June 2, 2007
WASHINGTON -- How would Jesus vote? For many white, evangelical Christians, the answer has long been clear: Opposition to abortion and gay rights has unified religious conservatives behind Republican candidates. But new developments, both in politics and in churches, are testing that relationship. Dissatisfaction with the Republican presidential field, an expanding evangelical agenda and Democratic outreach are threatening the cohesion of a bloc widely credited with making George W. Bush president.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | December 25, 2006
ATLANTA -- For a few decades now, a narrow view of Christianity has dominated the public square; it's a pinched theology consumed with sexuality but also taking a variety of conservative positions - such as opposition to tax increases - that don't seem to have much to do with the Gospel. That hard-shell Christianity has as its standard-bearers such men as the Rev. Jerry Falwell, James Dobson and the Rev. Pat Robertson. The good news of this Christmas season is this: Not only have those theocrats seen their political influence erode with Republican losses in the midterm elections, but their brand of Christianity is also losing its monopoly on the public square.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH AND MICHAEL SRAGOW and CHRIS KALTENBACH AND MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN REPORTERS | August 1, 2006
Was Mel Gibson an anti-Semite showing his true colors early Friday? Or was he just a drunk saying something offensive, as some observers suggested? Hollywood insiders and religious leaders speculated yesterday on how Gibson's career would be affected by his drunken tirade during a traffic stop, in which he reportedly blamed Jews for "all the wars in the world" and asked the arresting deputy, "Are you a Jew?" "When Mel Gibson gets pulled over by an officer ... and starts ranting about Jews around the world, it begins to look like a very dark character defect," says film historian Pat McGilligan, author of a forthcoming first biography of pioneering black filmmaker Oscar Micheaux.
NEWS
By JEFF ZELENY and JEFF ZELENY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 14, 2006
LYNCHBURG, Va. -- Sen. John McCain forcefully defended the Iraq war in a commencement address yesterday at the Rev. Jerry Falwell's Liberty University, but he said disagreement over the conflict and other contentious issues should be conducted with greater respect and tolerance. "I believe the benefits of success will justify the costs and the risks we have incurred," McCain said. "But if an American feels the decision was unwise, then they should state their opposition and argue for another course.
NEWS
By Tom Bisset | January 6, 1995
AS AN EVANGELICAL Christian, I was delighted when the newly elected Congress officially took office this week.I welcome the prospect of a cut in taxes and a smaller, less TC intrusive government, and I am overjoyed by the thought of congressional resistance to President Clinton's social liberalism.In the midst of all this happiness, I have a concern. I worry that this conservative Congress may misinterpret the widespread electoral support it enjoyed among evangelical Christians in the midterm elections.
NEWS
By Tom Bisset | June 22, 1995
I AM SITTING in church looking at the minister, but I am not listening. My mind has temporarily surrendered its spiritual responsibilities; I muse on the subject of verbal violence in our land.Liberal or conservative, small town or big city, powerless or powerful, we are after one another in a rhetorical war that is unprecedented in American history. Kindness and gentleness are absent. Tolerance is unknown.I ponder the role of the evangelical church in all of this. We meet weekly for worship as members of a local body of believers.
NEWS
By STEPHANIE SIMON and STEPHANIE SIMON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 23, 2006
ATLANTA -- Ruth Malhotra went to court last month for the right to be intolerant. Malhotra says her Christian faith compels her to speak out against homosexuality. But the Georgia Institute of Technology, where she's a senior, bans speech that puts down others because of sexual orientation. Malhotra sees that as an unacceptable infringement on her right to religious expression. She's demanding that Georgia Tech revoke its tolerance policy. With her lawsuit, the 22-year-old student joins a growing campaign to force public schools, state colleges and private workplaces to eliminate policies protecting homosexuals from harassment.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | March 2, 2006
With the brief sermon concluded, the worshipers filed into the aisle of the old stone chapel. The morning sun cast a stained-glass glow over the 19th-century sanctuary. People approached the dais one by one. Standing before them, the Rev. Jason Poling pressed his thumb into a small bowl of palm ashes and traced a cross on the forehead of each. "Remember that you are dust," he said. "And to dust you shall return." Christians throughout the world marked the start of Lent yesterday by receiving the mark that is meant to remind them of their mortality - a tradition that dates to the first millennium.
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