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NEWS
April 20, 2009
LILLIAN ELIZABETH EVANDER, an avid horsewoman and outdoor enthusiast, died of injuries resulting from a fall in Salida, Colorado on March 3, 2009. The Vail, Colorado resident was 51. Known as Beth, Ms. Evander was born on August 7, 1957, in Baltimore, the daughter of the late Janet Rice Evander and B. Dixon Evander of Hunt Valley, Maryland. A 1976 graduate of St. Paul's School for Girls, she received a degree in Biology/Environmental Science with honors from Hood College in 1980. Ahead of her time, Ms. Evander grew organic mushrooms on her family's property in Timonium.
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NEWS
April 20, 2009
LILLIAN ELIZABETH EVANDER, an avid horsewoman and outdoor enthusiast, died of injuries resulting from a fall in Salida, Colorado on March 3, 2009. The Vail, Colorado resident was 51. Known as Beth, Ms. Evander was born on August 7, 1957, in Baltimore, the daughter of the late Janet Rice Evander and B. Dixon Evander of Hunt Valley, Maryland. A 1976 graduate of St. Paul's School for Girls, she received a degree in Biology/Environmental Science with honors from Hood College in 1980. Ahead of her time, Ms. Evander grew organic mushrooms on her family's property in Timonium.
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SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | April 27, 1994
The doctor's words hit like a ton of bricks."Evander Holyfield fought most of the fight with his heart failing," said Dr. J. Ronald Stephens of Atlanta, the former heavyweight champion's personal physician. "It was a miracle he was able to finish."As a result of that disclosure yesterday, two-time champion Holyfield has called an end to a distinguished 10-year professional career.It was after he had lost the World Boxing Association-International Boxing Federation title to Michael Moorer in Las Vegas last Friday that tests in a hospital disclosed Holyfield was suffering from a kidney ailment which, in turn, uncovered a problem in his heart.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | December 18, 2002
THERE IS always the picture, the one with Muhammad Ali sitting on the stool in his corner, exhausted, with towels draped over his head, unable to come out for the 11th round against Larry Holmes in 1980. The image always comes back, like when Michael Jordan fails to get enough elevation for a dunk or when Cal Ripken didn't have enough mobility to go in the hole at shortstop. Ali had an enormous amount of energy throughout his career, yet in the end, not enough to move his little finger.
BUSINESS
By Brian Sullam | September 14, 1991
A Baltimore insurance broker won an $8.7 million judgment yesterday against the state's largest medical malpractice insurance company on the grounds that it had driven him out of business in retaliation for selling a competitor's product.After six hours of deliberation, a Baltimore Circuit Court jury agreed with B. Dixon Evander's contentions that his business was destroyed by Medical Mutual Liability Insurance Society of Maryland in May 1989 when it refused to accept any more business from Mr. Evander's firm.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | September 12, 1990
Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Meyer M. Cardin has reduced punitive damage award against Alexander & Alexander Services Inc. from $40 million to $12.5 million, saying in his oral opinion that the original award was "outrageous or outlandish."But Alexander & Alexander, a New York insurance brokerage firm, will appeal the decision because it does not believe punitive damages should be awarded in the case.A lawyer for B. Dixon Evander, the insurance broker that brought the case, was pleased by the Aug. 31 decision, saying that it should be more defensible on appeal.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | December 10, 1994
Maryland's highest court has handed Alexander & Alexander Services Inc. a victory by striking down a punitive damage award that initially was one of the highest such legal awards in the state's history.The opinion also lauds the virtues of business competition, acknowledging that aggressive marketplace tactics can intentionally hurt a competitor.The Court of Appeals ruled unanimously that A&A, a New York-based insurance brokerage, did not maliciously harm Hunt Valley insurance broker B. Dixon Evander by interfering with Mr. Evander's business relationship with another firm.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein | June 27, 1997
LAS VEGAS -- The Nevada State Athletic Commission rejected last night an appeal by Mike Tyson's managers to replace Mitch Halpern as referee for tomorrow night's heavyweight title rematch with champion Evander Holyfield.Luther Mack cast the only dissenting vote among the five commissioners at the hour-long hearing in which Tyson's co-managers protested the naming of Halpern, who worked last November's fight in which Holyfield scored a stunning 11th-round knockout.But Tyson himself told ESPN yesterday, "I'm not here to complain.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1997
LAS VEGAS -- Only seven months ago, before his first heavyweight title fight with Mike Tyson, ring critics were ready to relegate Evander Holyfield to -- in the vernacular of boxing -- the ranks of "shot fighters."Holyfield fell victim to fatigue in losing his rubber match with Riddick Bowe in 1995, and then looked quite ordinary in whipping a flabby Bobby Czyz 13 months ago.The question was whether Holyfield really had heart problems or had simply waged too many tough fights. Even his manager, Shelly Finkel, and former trainer, Lou Duva, urged him to retire.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | June 20, 1992
LAS VEGAS -- Undisputed champion Evander Holyfield will only be too happy to take on the young lions in the heavyweight division after surviving his senior tour without distinction last night by outpointing Larry Holmes, a 6-1 underdog, in a surprisingly competitive 12-round match at Caesars Palace.Holmes, 42, proved almost as stubborn a championship foe as George Foreman, another plus-40 former champion who had Holyfield in jeopardy in going the distance last year.The decision was unanimous for Holyfield (28-0, 22 KOs)
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2002
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. - The fighter and the trainer agree: If Hasim Rahman is to defeat Evander Holyfield tomorrow night, he'll have to be both a boxer and a puncher, not exclusively one or the other. For if Rahman tries to play it safe by backing up, Holyfield will wade in and fire away at him. If Rahman tries to go for an early knockout, he could be the one who winds up on the canvas. "It's going to take plenty of heart and plenty of smarts," Rahman said. Said Rahman's trainer, Bouie Fisher: "Power is great, but speed and power are better."
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1999
The deeply religious Evander Holyfield said he had "a revelation" that he would knock out Lennox Lewis in the third round of their first heavyweight title fight.But in a recent conference call, Holyfield revealed a deeper reason for his prognostication: That revelation was out of anger at being labeled a hypocrite by his opponent.Lewis, 34, had gotten under Holyfield's skin after implying that Holyfield -- who is married but has fathered five children out of wedlock -- wasn't quite so holy.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1999
NEW YORK -- A few years ago, Evander Holyfield joined his brother, Bernard, in writing a book entitled, "The Humble Warrior," describing how a boy rose from the ghetto in Atlanta to become a heavyweight champion with untold wealth, but still known to the public for his true grit and grace in and out of the ring.That's why it seemed totally out of character for Holyfield to predict he would knock out Lennox Lewis in three rounds in their fight for the undisputed heavyweight title at Madison Square Garden tonight.
SPORTS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | November 20, 1998
ATLANTA -- After eight weeks of conference calls and facing a possible repeat of last year's fizzled negotiations, officials zTC representing Evander Holyfield and Lennox Lewis finally have reached an agreement in principle for a heavyweight title unification March 13 at Madison Square Garden in New York."
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1998
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- Up close, World Boxing Council heavyweight champion Lennox Lewis comes across as a polite, somewhat aloof Englishman, totally lacking the intimidating facade of Mike Tyson or the late Sonny Liston.He has made a reputation by beating up the second tier of heavyweights -- Tyrell Biggs, Tommy Morrison and Razor Ruddock. He won his last three title bouts when Oliver McCall, Henry Akinwande and Andrew Golota offered little or no resistance.He has talked boldly of taking on all comers, but, for various reasons, matches with former champions Riddick Bowe and Tyson and present International Boxing Federation and World Boxing Association king Evander Holyfield have failed to materialize.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1997
LAS VEGAS -- Evander Holyfield attracted some 8,000 witnesses Thursday night to his "Holy Warrior" religious crusade at a minor-league ballpark that rocked with gospel singing and prayers.Saturday night, Holyfield rocked the Thomas & Mack Center, dropping Michael Moorer five times on the way to an eighth-round knockout that unified the World Boxing Association and International Boxing Federation heavyweight titles."I've won two belts now, one for Jesus and one for the Holy Spirit," said Holyfield, who hopes to complete the unification of the heavyweight crown when he fights World Boxing Council champion Lennox Lewis of England next spring.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | November 13, 1992
LAS VEGAS -- For undisputed heavyweight champion Evander Holyfield, tonight's title defense against Riddick Bowe is the defining fight of his professional career, a chance to finally gain the respect of critics with an overpowering performance against a young, strong, unbeaten challenger.For Bowe and his outspoken manager Rock Newman, winning boxing's biggest bauble would offer conclusive proof that it is still possible to win a championship without forming entangling alliances with one of the leading promoters.
SPORTS
By Robert Seltzer and Robert Seltzer,Knight-Ridder | April 2, 1992
PHILADELPHIA -- It is 1 p.m., and Evander Holyfield and Larry Holmes are boarding a train fueled by hype.Promoters, who call Holmes the "professor of pugilism," have dubbed this excursion the "class trip."The destination is Philadelphia.No, scratch that, the destination is the imagination of boxing fans throughout the country, and the promoters thought they could arrive there with the publicity gimmick of taking the fighters and the media on a brief train trip.The journey began in Washington with a press conference, and ended in Philadelphia with -- what else?
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1997
LAS VEGAS -- This time there would be no talk of a failing heart, a sore shoulder, a cut eye or a lack of motivation.Evander Holyfield buried the frustration of losing his heavyweight title to Michael Moorer three years ago and firmly established himself as the world's premier heavyweight by dropping Moorer five times last night before ring doctor Flip Homansky advised referee Mitch Halpern to stop the brutal bout at the end of the eighth round.Holyfield, 35, the World Boxing Association champion, picked up Moorer's International Boxing Federation championship belt last night and now will strive to become the undisputed champion by challenging World Boxing Council champion Lennox Lewis next spring, if boxing's politics can be surmounted.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1997
LAS VEGAS -- Some 30 months ago, Evander Holyfield stunned the boxing world by announcing his retirement from the ring at age 31."Yes, I'm quitting," he said, in the bizarre aftermath of losing his heavyweight championship to Michael Moorer at Caesars Palace. Bloodied, beaten and badly dehydrated, Holyfield was diagnosed as suffering from a "stiff heart," a condition that resulted in extreme fatigue.His personal physician, Dr. J. Roland Stephens, said it was "a miracle" he was able to finish the 12-round fight.
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