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Euthanasia

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NEWS
November 6, 1991
Voters in Washington state rejected the nation's first ballot proposal legalising euthanasia for the terminally ill. Advocates of doctor-assisted suicide say it is a long overdue right that offers a reprieve to the terminally ill from long suffering.The Evening Sun wants to know whether you think doctor-assisted suicide for th terminally ill should be legalized.To register your opinion, call SUNDIAL at 783-1800 (or 268-7736 in Anne Arundel County). After you hear the greeting, you'll be asked to punch in four-digit code on your Touch-Tone phone.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 21, 2013
During the Christmas season when many celebrate a unique and miraculous birth, what the late Pope John Paul II called "a culture of death" continues its march. Last week, the upper house of the Belgian Senate voted to extend a 2002 law legalizing euthanasia for adults so that it includes incurably ill children. The amended law will now have to be voted on by the Parliament's lower house, a vote expected to take place before elections in May, but if passed, writes The New York Times, children afflicted with "constant and unbearable physical suffering" and "equipped with a capacity for discernment" could then be legally euthanized in Belgium.
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NEWS
July 6, 2013
I was dismayed to read Catherine Weber's letter calling for right-to-die legislation ("Right-to-die legislation needed in Maryland," July 1). I am opposed to physician-assisted suicide not only in Maryland but throughout America. Hospice and palliative care can reduce the demand for those steps. Cicely Saunders, who founded the esteemed St. Christopher's Hospice in London, a treatment facility for dying patients, reported almost no requests for euthanasia when pain was significantly reduced and feelings of loneliness were addressed.
NEWS
July 6, 2013
I was dismayed to read Catherine Weber's letter calling for right-to-die legislation ("Right-to-die legislation needed in Maryland," July 1). I am opposed to physician-assisted suicide not only in Maryland but throughout America. Hospice and palliative care can reduce the demand for those steps. Cicely Saunders, who founded the esteemed St. Christopher's Hospice in London, a treatment facility for dying patients, reported almost no requests for euthanasia when pain was significantly reduced and feelings of loneliness were addressed.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | April 6, 1993
Helping terminally ill patients take their own lives -- a practice brought to national attention by Michigan physician Jack Kevorkian in recent months -- remains controversial.The issues are emotional and touch on morality, law, philosophy and theology. Michigan recently legislated against Dr. Kevorkian's suicide assistance.The Rev. Frederick J. Hanna is a priest of the Episcopal Diocese of Maryland with views on the subject that some might call unusual for a cleric -- he says mercy killing and suicide can be justified.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul McHugh and By Paul McHugh,Special to the Sun | December 29, 2002
A Merciful End: The Euthanasia Movement in Modern America, by Ian Dowbiggin. Oxford University Press. 224 pages. $28. Ian Dowbiggin, a professor of history at the University of Prince Edward Island, has just written a "must read" book on the history of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide titled A Merciful End. If you wonder why "living wills" and health care "power of attorney" won support at the ballot box but physician-assisted suicide proposals mostly...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 23, 1996
Acting on their own, or with at least the tacit consent of doctors or families, one in five nurses in intensive care units report that they have deliberately hastened patients' deaths, according to a national survey.But a number of experts said the survey questions were so ambiguous that they were subject to misinterpretation.Instead of revealing critical care units filled with self-appointed angels of death, they said, the nurses' responses revealed their anxieties and confusion about where palliative care ends and euthanasia begins.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 26, 1998
A Michigan prosecutor brought first-degree murder charges against Dr. Jack Kevorkian yesterday for administering a lethal injection last September to a terminally ill man who wished to die, a videotaped act of euthanasia that was nationally televised Sunday.David Gorcyca, the prosecutor for Oakland County, said Kevorkian's actions clearly fit the definition of premeditated murder and that the consent of the dying man, who had Lou Gehrig's disease, is no legal defense.Kevorkian claims to have presided over more than 120 suicides, but this case was the first in which he took a direct role in causing a death.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 21, 2013
During the Christmas season when many celebrate a unique and miraculous birth, what the late Pope John Paul II called "a culture of death" continues its march. Last week, the upper house of the Belgian Senate voted to extend a 2002 law legalizing euthanasia for adults so that it includes incurably ill children. The amended law will now have to be voted on by the Parliament's lower house, a vote expected to take place before elections in May, but if passed, writes The New York Times, children afflicted with "constant and unbearable physical suffering" and "equipped with a capacity for discernment" could then be legally euthanized in Belgium.
NEWS
By Barbara A. Frush | March 19, 2013
When 45,000 dogs and cats are tragically killed yearly in Maryland, costing taxpayers over $8 million, a remedy is long overdue. That's why Sen. Joanne Benson and I sponsored House Bill 767 and Senate Bill 820 in the 2013 General Assembly. It will establish a voluntary, low-cost spay-neuter program for dogs and cats owned by low-income Marylanders - and it will do this without raising your taxes. Each year, close to 100,000 dogs and cats are surrendered to Maryland animal shelters and control facilities, including boxes of puppies and kittens, and the public must pay for their care.
NEWS
By Barbara A. Frush | March 19, 2013
When 45,000 dogs and cats are tragically killed yearly in Maryland, costing taxpayers over $8 million, a remedy is long overdue. That's why Sen. Joanne Benson and I sponsored House Bill 767 and Senate Bill 820 in the 2013 General Assembly. It will establish a voluntary, low-cost spay-neuter program for dogs and cats owned by low-income Marylanders - and it will do this without raising your taxes. Each year, close to 100,000 dogs and cats are surrendered to Maryland animal shelters and control facilities, including boxes of puppies and kittens, and the public must pay for their care.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2012
Yesterday I was introduced to a new reporter at The Sun  and described as the editor in charge of the copy desk.  "Oh," he said, "you're the one who will kill my darlings. " I said, "I prefer to think of it as euthanasia. "     
NEWS
May 10, 2010
After reading the "Cat caretakers work under the radar" (May 10) I am incensed. As a resident of Baltimore County, I'm also embarrassed and disappointed in my representatives. Not only do they appear to condone needless euthanizing of animals but they are willing to waste taxpayer dollars in order to do so. Trap-neuter-return programs have already prevented the births of thousands of kittens, most of which would have been destroyed at taxpayer and county expense in the Baltimore County shelter.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,paul.west@baltsun.com | August 16, 2009
Rubin Sztajer left a German concentration camp alive, but he worries about surviving a government health care overhaul. "I've been sentenced to death before by the Nazis," said the 84-year-old from Timonium. "I don't want to be sentenced again." Seniors like Sztajer are fearful that government bureaucrats will block access to their medical care if President Barack Obama's plan becomes law. These concerns are being fed, in no small part, by an effective conservative assault on a relatively short provision that involves end-of-life counseling.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | August 9, 2009
As an example of how opponents of health care reform have been able to twist facts to scare older Americans, look no further than a comment made to President Barack Obama during a recent town hall meeting. Mary of North Carolina told the president she was worried about rumors she's heard about health care legislation. "I have been told there is a policy in there that everyone that's Medicare age will be visited and told to decide how they wish to die," Mary said. "This bothers me greatly."
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | July 14, 2006
The disease that struck down thoroughbred great Secretariat is the same one threatening the life of this year's Kentucky Derby winner, Barbaro. Laminitis is an inflammation of the soft tissue - called the laminae - that connects the horse's bony foot to the hoof. As the lamina starts to break down, the bone can become detached from the hoof and rotate within it. The pain is often so intense that veterinarians recommend ending the horse's life rather than subjecting the animal to more suffering.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | April 25, 1997
AMSTERDAM -- It began with the oddest of rallying cries. People started talking about the "right to die" as if dying were not an inevitable human condition.By the 1970s we had seen more than our share of people tied, tubed, and plugged in to a semblance of life. Gradually some began to wave the banner of patients' rights and reclaim power from medical technology and technocrats playing doctor.But somewhere along the way the right-to-die movement went from asking about stopping treatment to asking for a doctor's help in dying.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 10, 1993
Judge Arnick sounds like an oxymoron.If Washington means to tax the underground economy, it better come up with more EZ forms.Virginia sells guns the way North Carolina sells tobacco. Their good business is fatal to the rest of us.The Dutch euthanasia law could provide a merciful end to European unity.GM trucks are safer than NBC exposes.
NEWS
April 22, 2004
Norris McWhirter, 78, co-founder of the Guinness Book of Records, final arbiter on everything from the fastest climb of Mount Everest to the world's longest hot dog, died Monday after a heart attack at his home in southern England. The first Guinness book appeared in 1954, edited and compiled by Mr. McWhirter and his twin brother, Ross, both noted British athletes and journalists. At first, it was published by the Guinness brewery as a book for settling trivia disputes in pubs. Ross was murdered by the Irish Republican Army in 1975, but Norris McWhirter continued to edit the book until 1986 and was advisory editor until 1996.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul McHugh and By Paul McHugh,Special to the Sun | December 29, 2002
A Merciful End: The Euthanasia Movement in Modern America, by Ian Dowbiggin. Oxford University Press. 224 pages. $28. Ian Dowbiggin, a professor of history at the University of Prince Edward Island, has just written a "must read" book on the history of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide titled A Merciful End. If you wonder why "living wills" and health care "power of attorney" won support at the ballot box but physician-assisted suicide proposals mostly...
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