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By Ray McGovern | July 8, 2013
There is a way out for President Barack Obama as he attempts to cope with Edward Snowden's disclosures about the National Security Agency's overreaching eavesdropping, the turbulent world reaction, and the lack of truthfulness shown by National Intelligence Director James Clapper and NSA Director Keith Alexander. The President should seize the initiative by suggesting to both that they "spend more time with their families. " Not since President George W. Bush attacked Iraq has there been so much discontent among our closest allies with U.S. behavior.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
If an English country squire or a wealthy industrialist of the Gilded Age were to have an in-town home, 106 E. Chase St. would fit the bill to a tee. Built in the 1880s, the detached, three-story Romanesque-style home fits well among the other elegant residences in Mount Vernon. "This house is one-of-a-kind and irreplaceable," said listing agent Julie Canard of Long & Foster Real Estate. "There is no way you could duplicate this, for millions of dollars. " The home's original owner, George Jenkins, was enamored of the skill and craftsmanship of builders who emigrated from Europe.
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NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | August 9, 2012
Watching the Olympic Games, I find one phenomenon particularly striking. After an event, athletes who literally seconds before had been attempting to trounce one another in competition suddenly start hugging each other. An outsider might wonder about this coexistence of competition and affection. As a former elite-level swimmer, I can tell you: While it's every athlete's goal to win, athletes realize that their competitors are largely responsible for pushing them to their best performances.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
Maryland freshman Dion Wiley's summer began the day he reported to school in early June for classes, official team workouts and pickup games. When his new Terps teammates went home for a couple of weeks in mid-August, Wiley's basketball education continued in Europe. In what was the first trip out of the country for the 18-year-old from Prince George's County, Wiley was part of a regional all-star team of college players that spent more than a week in England, Germany, Belgium and The Netherlands.
NEWS
By Zachary Shore | December 8, 2004
THE SLAYING of Dutch filmmaker Theo van Gogh had nearly receded from the headlines when Geert Wilders, a prominent Dutch politician, sparked more controversy by calling for a halt to Muslim immigration. In response, a Dutch Muslim teacher declared on TV that he wished for Mr. Wilders' death. Most observers, struggling to make sense of Holland's sudden violent outburst, classify Mr. van Gogh's slaying as a grisly case of Islamic extremism. They stack it upon a heap of mental clippings together with Madrid's train bombings and America's 9/11.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | July 4, 1996
Interest in Eastern European choirs singing all manner of music has burgeoned in our country in recent years, and this Saturday such a choir will appear at the Second Presbyterian Church.The 18 voices of the Bratislava Conservatory Chamber Choir from Slovakia will perform, under the direction of their director, Daniela Sliacka, a program of sacred, secular and folk music. Anyone interested in why these dark, Slavic voices are creating such a stir is invited to hear this group, which has also been invited to perform at the governor's mansion in Annapolis and in Washington.
SPORTS
By Jeff Shain, Tribune newspapers | May 26, 2011
Two weeks after the PGA Tour's "fifth major," the global schedule brings us the "other fifth major. " This week's BMW PGA Championship is the European Tour's flagship event — and with the strength of European golf these days, getting more vocal support as the next in prestige behind the four majors. "This is definitely taking the place of the TPC," Ernie Els told reporters this week. That follows word from world No.1 Lee Westwood , who said recently the BMW PGA "is the biggest title that I play for outside the majors.
BUSINESS
By Journal of Commerce | July 2, 1992
BRUSSELS, Belgium -- The European Community's top trade official accused U.S. steel companies yesterday of "harassing" world trade by launching a wave of suits charging foreign steelmakers with unfair trade practices.EC Trade Commissioner Frans Andriessen said he will seek immediate top-level consultations with the Bush administration after major U.S. steel companies filed 84 petitions with the U.S. government Tuesday against foreign steelmakers, including 38 from seven EC countries.The U.S. steel producers asked the government to impose penalty duties on about 6.5 million net tons a year of sheet and plate imports.
NEWS
By JEANE KIRKPATRICK | May 27, 1992
Step by unprecedented step Western Europe moves toward union. Though American headlines more often focus on disagreements among the 12 member-states of the European Community and failures in collaboration among them, actual developments testify to the magnetic power of the idea of Europe -- for ''the 12,'' and for the rest of Europe as well.Several recent events show that European peoples who have fought and died to preserve their independence and sovereignty -- from each other -- are now ready to forgo or ''transfer'' that sovereignty to a supra-national European entity still being created.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | July 1, 1995
A surge in trans-Atlantic travel is boosting international traffic at BWI this summer with double-digit growth prompting major carriers and charter services to add flights.Much of the increased traffic is coming from Europe as the weak dollar makes travel in the United States a bargain. And, despite the unfavorable exchange rate, more American passengers are traveling to Europe as well, according to BWI officials and travel agents."It's a better bargain for Europeans coming here but Americans are also traveling more to Europe," said Jay Hierholzer, associate administrator of marketing and development for the Maryland Aviation Administration, which operates Baltimore-Washington International Airport.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | August 19, 2014
Incoming Maryland men's basketball freshman Dion Wiley has been one of the top players during Global Sports Academy's 2014 Men's Basketball Goodwill tour across Europe. With just one game remaining, Wiley has led his squad in scoring in each of the first four matchups with various European opponents. Wiley is the only Terp on a team that also includes players from North Carolina State and Mount St.Mary's. Against Basics Melsele of Belgium, Wiley had 11 points and four rebounds. He followed up that performance with a 14-point, three-rebound display against Germany's SG Sechtem.
NEWS
July 29, 2014
After months of resisting U.S. calls for tougher economic sanctions against Russia in response to its support for separatist rebels in Ukraine, the major European powers agreed yesterday on a package of measures targeting Russia's financial, energy and military sectors that in some cases go even farther than the actions the U.S. itself has taken. Whether that will be enough to alter Russian President Vladimir Putin's calculations in the covert war he is waging in Ukraine remains to be seen.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
Yesterday in one sentence: It's a little early to declare a team completely dead, but Spain looked completely dead yesterday. What's on tap: Colombia vs. Greece, 12 p.m., ABC; Uruguay vs. Costa Rica, 3 p.m.; ABC; England vs. Italy, 6 p.m., ESPN; Ivory Coast vs. Japan, 9 p.m., ESPN. What you'll see: England and Italy are the highest-profile sides to kick off their World Cup campaigns Saturday, but they're far from the most exciting teams that will be in action. That honor goes to one of Uruguay or Colombia, a pair of South American sides that can go a long way toward advancing to the knockout rounds with wins today.
NEWS
By David W. Wise | May 27, 2014
This year marks the passage of one century since of the start of the First World War. It is the year that will mark the 75th anniversary of the Nazi invasion of Poland, which launched the Second World War. It is also the year that will mark a quarter of a century since the fall of the Berlin Wall. The two world wars were catastrophic events in which Europe, motivated by parochial interests and fears, divided up against itself and unleashed the greatest violence ever known in history, resulting in the deaths of 76 million.
NEWS
By Andrés Martinez | May 7, 2014
When the National Football League draft kicks off Thursday night, last year's worst teams will get to pick first - and ostensibly best - under a principle that's guided the draft since its inception in 1936: that there should be competitive parity among teams. It's an equality model that we can't achieve in our economy - something Europeans delight in pointing out. And it's exactly opposite the approach used "across the pond," where the abilities of their professional football teams - soccer to Americans - can vary widely.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
The Anne Arundel Community College Symphony Orchestra continues to surpass audience expectations under music director and conductor Anna Binneweg, now in her eighth season at the college. Having performed six concerts in its first European tour in March, the orchestra - made up of students and county residents of all ages - continues to explore new challenges and polish new facets of this gem. The "Made in America" concert last weekend displayed the orchestra's expertise: in the first half, delivering 20th-century American masterworks along with premiering an intriguing 21st-century work composed by adjunct professor Gregory Pascuzzi - with a huge surprise in the second half.
NEWS
By DAVID SHORR | December 27, 1992
In the councils of the international community, the oft-repeated lesson of the Yugoslav war is that would-be mediators should get involved early.The embarrassment felt by political leaders is finally leading them to try to do just that. In various hot spots in the former Soviet Union, the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE), the lead international body for such matters, is dispatching diplomats to negotiate political settlements with the disputing parties.Serbs and Croats in Bosnia seem committed to waging war. But for other regions the time is ripe.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley left Tuesday for a five-day trip to Europe that includes a "congressional pilgrimage" to northern Ireland and a conference in Amsterdam. The governor, whose Irish heritage inspired his Celtic rock band and his taste in poetry, will first visit Dublin along with civil rights leader U.S. Rep. John Lewis of Georgia as part of a 50-person delegation to learn about the island's historic divide and reconciliation efforts, organizers said. O'Malley then plans to attend a conference on progressive governance in Amsterdam on Thursday and Friday before returning to Ireland, his office spokeswoman said.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
Ze Mean Bean Cafe, a popular Eastern European-styled, Fells Point restaurant, had its liquor license revoked by the city's liquor board Thursday, the board chairman said. Baltimore City Liquor License Board Chairman Steve Fogleman said Thursday evening that the bar had committed two violations - not cooperating with inspectors and serving alcohol without picking up their 2013 liquor license from the board. A chef at the restaurant did not appear at a hearing in front of the board as required, he said.
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