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By EDUARDO CUE | September 20, 1992
Paris. -- If it is defeated, the four-decade old construction of a united Europe will grind to a halt, leading the continent's major powers to go their own way. The European Monetary System that has insured financial stability will disintegrate, causing chaos on the stock and money markets. Europe's role in the world will diminish, with the old continent losing the chance of competing against the United States and Japan. An impotent European Community will watch as many of the newly independent republics that once made up the Soviet Union disintegrate into warring tribes, in the manner of Yugoslavia.
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NEWS
By Michael Finnegan and Michael Finnegan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 25, 2008
BERLIN - He has drawn record-breaking crowds to rallies all over the United States. But it took a trip to Germany for Barack Obama to attract his biggest audience of all: More than 200,000 people packed into a central Berlin park yesterday to hear Obama give a wide-ranging speech on his call for closer ties between Europe and America. The sea of people in the Tiergarten, Berlin's central park, stretched a full mile, from the Victory Column where Obama spoke to the historic Brandenburg Gate.
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NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | September 26, 1992
BERLIN -- Chancellor Helmut Kohl capped a week of attack and maneuver yesterday with a vigorous defense before the German Parliament of the Maastricht Treaty for European unity."
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 9, 2003
BRUSSELS, Belgium - Corine Devillers sells a varied lot. Little flags on skinny sticks are for sale next to sweat shirts folded on shelves, hats hanging on pegs, pencils resting in cases, posters stuck to walls and tiny stuffed bears snuggling in the windows. In many ways, though, she is selling only one product: white elephants. She works on the edge of the Grand Place, one of Europe's most impressive public squares, at a shop called Eurostore. The flags, the shirts, the hats - virtually everything she sells - are adorned with a circle of 15 stars, the emblem of the European Union, itself a symbol of European unity, something that no longer exists.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 16, 1993
BRUSSELS, Belgium -- Denmark will have another chance t vote for European unity Tuesday, but it may be too late to put the movement back on track any time soon.Fundamental doubts about the European Community's march to political and economic unity -- common European defense and foreign policies, a single EC currency -- have spread to all the community's major countries. Germany is worried about losing its currency, France about its identity and Britain about itssovereignty.In this atmosphere, a yes vote in Denmark might not be enough to give EC political leaders the will and the popular support they need to press toward unity.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | September 27, 1991
LONDON -- The road to European economic and political unity has never been smooth, but Prime Minister John Major raised the ZTC possibility yesterday that it might come to a dead end in just two months, at least as far as Britain is concerned.Although he has not said so publicly, his office has let it be known that Britain might veto a treaty on European unity, scheduled to be signed by the 12-nation European Community in Maastricht, Netherlands, in December.If that happens, the entire process of European integration, started more than 30 years ago with the signing of the Treaty of Rome in 1957, will grind to a halt or limp along without Britain, and possibly without some other members as well.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | September 18, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration and U.S. markets were unfazed yesterday by the chaos engulfing European currencies and threatening economic union on the continent."
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 10, 1993
Judge Arnick sounds like an oxymoron.If Washington means to tax the underground economy, it better come up with more EZ forms.Virginia sells guns the way North Carolina sells tobacco. Their good business is fatal to the rest of us.The Dutch euthanasia law could provide a merciful end to European unity.GM trucks are safer than NBC exposes.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | March 12, 1991
LONDON -- Prime Minister John Major, rejecting Thatcher-style confrontation with the continent, yesterday pledged Britain will now be "at the very heart of Europe."Mr. Major said he would relish negotiations for a Europe "more united, rather than less.""I am sure myself that Europe is stronger when Britain, France and Germany are working together and Britain is able to play a full part at the very center of the European Community," he said.He chose a meeting in Bonn with German Chancellor Helmut Kohl to present a striking contrast to his predecessor Margaret Thatcher's strident opposition to European unity.
NEWS
January 23, 1998
CONVULSIONS in Asia obscure the profound changes Europe is undergoing, enlarging and unifying at once. Whether to expand NATO is no longer subject to debate; it is happening. Whether the 15 members of the European Union, a single market for goods and labor, should get a single currency is moot. By New Year's Day, most of them will have it. At the same time, 11 more countries are scheduled for negotiations to join that club.Which adds prescience to the show of 17th-century painters from Utrecht, the Netherlands, which is at the Walters Art Gallery and will move to London's National Gallery.
NEWS
January 23, 1998
CONVULSIONS in Asia obscure the profound changes Europe is undergoing, enlarging and unifying at once. Whether to expand NATO is no longer subject to debate; it is happening. Whether the 15 members of the European Union, a single market for goods and labor, should get a single currency is moot. By New Year's Day, most of them will have it. At the same time, 11 more countries are scheduled for negotiations to join that club.Which adds prescience to the show of 17th-century painters from Utrecht, the Netherlands, which is at the Walters Art Gallery and will move to London's National Gallery.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Pond | October 9, 1996
BONN -- True, German Chancellor Helmut Kohl has dropped his dream of European political union for now. True, he doesn't expect much from the Intergovernmental Conference that for a sleepy half-year had been trying to beef up the powers of the European Union center.Yet it would be a mistake to write off political ''deepening'' of the European Union as a failure, as much British and American commentary has done. Nor should observers conclude that Europe's senior statesman has given up on trying to crown German unification with ''irreversible'' European integration.
NEWS
April 4, 1996
THIRTY SCIENTISTS convened in Geneva by the World Health Organization concluded yesterday that no link is proven between British cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and ten young people who contracted a new strain of Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease (CJD). The experts are confident there is no risk from milk.Simultaneously, yesterday, the agriculture ministers of 15 member countries of the European Union meeting in Brussels condemned 4.7 million British cattle to death over the next six years.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 26, 1994
CORFU, Greece -- The European Union summit broke up in disarray yesterday with Britain, the Continent's traditional maverick, standing alone against its 11 partners on the choice of a successor to Jacques Delors, the president of the European Commission and one of the Continent's most influential power brokers.The debacle left an impression of a body that, rather than exemplifying pan-European ideals, is again faltering because of the individual political agendas of its members."I believe I have come to the right decision, and I will not change it," British Prime Minister John Major told European leaders when they met yesterday in a final, vain attempt to persuade him to accept Belgian Prime Minister Jean-Luc Dehaene for the post.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH POND | September 23, 1993
Brussels. -- European Union isn't dead yet. All those epitaphs in the American press are greatly exaggerated.Sure, the European Monetary System exploded last month. Yugoslavia trumpets the European Community's inability to stop bloodshed on its doorstep. Public opinion in Germany resists giving up its beloved Deutsche mark for a common European ''ecu.'' And Paris and Bonn, the only partners who can make anything move in Europe, are at loggerheads over the interminable GATT trade negotiations.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | July 21, 1993
LONDON -- Once again the Maastricht Treaty on European Monetary and Political Union is at the center of a crisis of British politics.Once again John Major's career as prime minister is exposed to danger as the House of Commons prepares for a vote tomorrow on the controversial Social Chapter of the treaty.The Maastricht treaty would move the European Community countries toward monetary union and a single currency, possibly by the end of the century. It creates mechanisms for the formulation of common EC defense and diplomatic polices.
NEWS
By Paul Hemp and Paul Hemp,Boston Globe | January 2, 1993
BRUSSELS, Belgium -- For the European Community, 1992 was a terrible year.Originally envisioned as a historic milestone on the road to European unity, 1992 instead has seen the collapse of both the EC's currency exchange-rate system and the so-called Maastricht treaty, the foundation for future monetary and political union. As European leaders haggle over farm subsidies and a response to the war raging on their borders in the former Yugoslavia, Europe seems as fragmented as ever.But all this bad news overshadows a surprising success: the achievement, more or less, of a single European market.
NEWS
By FRANZ SCHURMANN | July 11, 1993
Even if the agreements reached at the G-7 Tokyo economic summitshould fall apart, NAFTA not pass Congress and GATT founder on European resistance, there is no way the world economy can be undone -- unless the world gives up on economic growth. And because the ineradicable flip side of the world economy is global migration, there also is no way it can be stopped.As these twin dynamics gain ground, the vision of European unity fades, along with giant regional economies in Europe, East Asia and North America.
NEWS
By FRANZ SCHURMANN | July 11, 1993
Even if the agreements reached at the G-7 Tokyo economic summitshould fall apart, NAFTA not pass Congress and GATT founder on European resistance, there is no way the world economy can be undone -- unless the world gives up on economic growth. And because the ineradicable flip side of the world economy is global migration, there also is no way it can be stopped.As these twin dynamics gain ground, the vision of European unity fades, along with giant regional economies in Europe, East Asia and North America.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 16, 1993
BRUSSELS, Belgium -- Denmark will have another chance t vote for European unity Tuesday, but it may be too late to put the movement back on track any time soon.Fundamental doubts about the European Community's march to political and economic unity -- common European defense and foreign policies, a single EC currency -- have spread to all the community's major countries. Germany is worried about losing its currency, France about its identity and Britain about itssovereignty.In this atmosphere, a yes vote in Denmark might not be enough to give EC political leaders the will and the popular support they need to press toward unity.
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