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By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
The Anne Arundel Community College Symphony Orchestra continues to surpass audience expectations under music director and conductor Anna Binneweg, now in her eighth season at the college. Having performed six concerts in its first European tour in March, the orchestra - made up of students and county residents of all ages - continues to explore new challenges and polish new facets of this gem. The "Made in America" concert last weekend displayed the orchestra's expertise: in the first half, delivering 20th-century American masterworks along with premiering an intriguing 21st-century work composed by adjunct professor Gregory Pascuzzi - with a huge surprise in the second half.
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SPORTS
Sports Digest | August 19, 2014
Incoming Maryland men's basketball freshman Dion Wiley has been one of the top players during Global Sports Academy's 2014 Men's Basketball Goodwill tour across Europe. With just one game remaining, Wiley has led his squad in scoring in each of the first four matchups with various European opponents. Wiley is the only Terp on a team that also includes players from North Carolina State and Mount St.Mary's. Against Basics Melsele of Belgium, Wiley had 11 points and four rebounds. He followed up that performance with a 14-point, three-rebound display against Germany's SG Sechtem.
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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | July 9, 1993
The Chesapeake Youth Symphony Orchestra, in only its fourth year, already is planning a European tour.The orchestra is scheduled to spend two weeks next June touring the Czech Republic and Slovakia.The members will lodge with their counterparts overseas as part of a cultural exchange. The tour tentatively will take the musicians to concerts in Prague, Bratislava and Brno.Maestro Arne Running, the Philadelphia clarinetist and conductor who is starting his second season with the orchestra, already is planning a program that will include the "New World Symphony" of Dvorak and Smetana's "The Moldau," two masterworks by Czech composers who continue to warm the hearts of their countrymen today.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
The Anne Arundel Community College Symphony Orchestra continues to surpass audience expectations under music director and conductor Anna Binneweg, now in her eighth season at the college. Having performed six concerts in its first European tour in March, the orchestra - made up of students and county residents of all ages - continues to explore new challenges and polish new facets of this gem. The "Made in America" concert last weekend displayed the orchestra's expertise: in the first half, delivering 20th-century American masterworks along with premiering an intriguing 21st-century work composed by adjunct professor Gregory Pascuzzi - with a huge surprise in the second half.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | November 30, 1990
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, which already receives substantially more state aid than any other Maryland cultural organization, is seeking a special $250,000 state grant to help defray the costs of a planned 1992 European tour.Without the grant from the state Department of Economic and Employment Development, the "chances are very close to nil" that the BSO could mount the three-week tour of major European capitals, John Gidwitz, the orchestra's executive director, said yesterday.He said the orchestra needed to raise $700,000 to mount the tour, with the remainder coming from individuals and corporations.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2003
They have been heroes in their homeland for their accomplishments in the Ryder Cup, champions many times over on the European Tour and virtual strangers to American fans until the advent of The Golf Channel. Yet in coming to play on the Senior Tour and now on the Champions Tour, Irishmen Christy O'Connor Jr., Eamonn Darcy and Des Smyth, as well as Scotland's Sam Torrance, have had to prove themselves all over again. For O'Connor, the proof of his pedigree came on a sweltering afternoon at Hobbit's Glen Golf Club in Columbia four years ago, when he overcame Bruce Fleisher and his own emotions to win the State Farm Senior Classic.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2005
She was 22, a virtual unknown rookie on the LPGA Tour, playing in her first U.S. Women's Open. When Liselotte Neumann came to the Five Farms course at Baltimore Country Club that July week in 1988, she didn't realize that she would soon become one of the LPGA's up-and-coming stars. "I was just so happy to be there, I had to qualify to even get there," Neumann, now 39, recalled earlier this year. "We came down from Boston and I had actually quite a good finish there, so I knew I was hitting the ball pretty good.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | November 21, 2001
GLASGOW - The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra arrived in Scotland last night safe and sound after an uneventful, ahead-of-schedule charter fight from Baltimore-Washington International Airport. The musicians get to enjoy time on their own today before plunging into a 12-city European tour - the BSO's first visit to this side of the Atlantic since 1987 - with an all-Brahms program conducted by music director Yuri Temirkanov on Thanksgiving Day at Glasgow Royal Concert Hall. The tour moves on this week to three midland British cities (concerts in Leeds and Birmingham are sold out)
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1997
TROON, Scotland -- When the 22-foot putt went in for birdie on the 18th hole yesterday at Royal Troon, the small crowd sitting in the bleachers cheered loudly for the player who made it.It didn't matter that it gave the player a round of even-par 71 or that he stood at 5-over par after three rounds of the 126th British Open. The only thing that mattered was who made the birdie.Asked later why he seems to finish so many rounds with birdies, Jack Nicklaus said, "Maybe because I'm just happy to get there, I guess."
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Staff Writer | June 19, 1992
HERSHEY, Pa. -- Laura Davies has a special interest in the Lady Keystone Open, this week's LPGA event at Hershey Country Club. She says she'll be able to put her driver back in the bag.Davies, a long-hitting Englishwoman who attracted attention in this country when she won a three-way playoff for the 1987 U.S. Women's Open championship, got off to a mediocre start in her fourth year on tour, but recent events have her in a positive mood.Not only has Hershey CC been one of her favorite courses since winning the 1989 LKO (when she birdied the last three holes)
NEWS
June 10, 2008
LJUBLJANA, Slovenia - President Bush's weeklong tour through Berlin, Rome, Paris and London appears every bit the glamorous old-style farewell tour with a leisurely schedule, jaunts to country castles and lavish dinners. But it's actually a high-stakes diplomatic mission, spurred by Bush's fear that Iran is an increasingly urgent threat and that Europe may not take it seriously enough. Bush has never been popular in Western Europe after the U.S. invasion of Iraq. "A lot of people like America.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | June 23, 2006
The Ellicott City Chorale gets its rich sound by combining the voices of teenagers from Mount Hebron High School with those of adults from Bethany United Methodist Church. Now the singers will see what that combination sounds like echoing through some of the largest domed cathedrals in the world - including St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican - during a 12-day, six-concert tour of Austria and Italy that began yesterday. "Put [the school and church singers] together and you have a solid group," said Patrick Gilbert, 17, of Woodstock.
TRAVEL
By RICHARD P. CARPENTER and RICHARD P. CARPENTER,THE BOSTON GLOBE | May 7, 2006
If you are vacationing in Europe this month, lucky you. In May, the weather is usually pleasant, costs are often lower, and most destinations are less congested. The same holds true for September. But whenever you go, look for savings along with the sights. The Royal Scotsman luxury train is offering a 50-percent companion fare for its four-day, Edinburgh round-trip Classic journey, July 18-22. The regular price is $5,580 per person fully inclusive, which means a savings of $2,790. There are several stops and many perks, along with fine dining, as the train makes its way along the countryside.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2005
She was 22, a virtual unknown rookie on the LPGA Tour, playing in her first U.S. Women's Open. When Liselotte Neumann came to the Five Farms course at Baltimore Country Club that July week in 1988, she didn't realize that she would soon become one of the LPGA's up-and-coming stars. "I was just so happy to be there, I had to qualify to even get there," Neumann, now 39, recalled earlier this year. "We came down from Boston and I had actually quite a good finish there, so I knew I was hitting the ball pretty good.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2003
They have been heroes in their homeland for their accomplishments in the Ryder Cup, champions many times over on the European Tour and virtual strangers to American fans until the advent of The Golf Channel. Yet in coming to play on the Senior Tour and now on the Champions Tour, Irishmen Christy O'Connor Jr., Eamonn Darcy and Des Smyth, as well as Scotland's Sam Torrance, have had to prove themselves all over again. For O'Connor, the proof of his pedigree came on a sweltering afternoon at Hobbit's Glen Golf Club in Columbia four years ago, when he overcame Bruce Fleisher and his own emotions to win the State Farm Senior Classic.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2002
GULLANE, Scotland - Will Jean-Francois Remesy of France become the Jean Van de Velde of the 131st British Open at Muirfield? Or, even better, will he become the Arnaud Massy? Remesy, 38, hopes to emulate his friend and countryman Van de Velde in some ways, but Massy in one significant way - becoming the first Frenchman to win the Open since Massy in 1907. With a 3-under-par 68 in yesterday's opening round that tied him for second, Remesy took a significant step in both directions. Given the history he has learned from Massy's victory - also the only one in the Open by a Frenchman - and the perspective he has learned from Van de Velde's cruel defeat at Carnoustie in 1999, Remesy is patiently awaiting his opportunity.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2002
GULLANE, Scotland - Will Jean-Francois Remesy of France become the Jean Van de Velde of the 131st British Open at Muirfield? Or, even better, will he become the Arnaud Massy? Remesy, 38, hopes to emulate his friend and countryman Van de Velde in some ways, but Massy in one significant way - becoming the first Frenchman to win the Open since Massy in 1907. With a 3-under-par 68 in yesterday's opening round that tied him for second, Remesy took a significant step in both directions. Given the history he has learned from Massy's victory - also the only one in the Open by a Frenchman - and the perspective he has learned from Van de Velde's cruel defeat at Carnoustie in 1999, Remesy is patiently awaiting his opportunity.
SPORTS
By JOHN W. STEWART and JOHN W. STEWART,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1997
David Oakley was in an enviable position going into the Senior PGA Tour qualifying tournament last November. He had a can't lose attitude, because if he failed to make the United States tour, he knew he would be exempt for events on the European tour.As it turned out, the onetime Northern Virginia resident was the most consistent player and his four straight subpar rounds (a 70 and three 71s for 283) placed him fourth."When you think only eight players from around the world gain fully exempt status, and to be one of them-it's amazing," Oakley said by telephone on the eve of the Senior Tour stop in the Kansas City suburb of Belton, Mo."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | November 21, 2001
GLASGOW - The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra arrived in Scotland last night safe and sound after an uneventful, ahead-of-schedule charter fight from Baltimore-Washington International Airport. The musicians get to enjoy time on their own today before plunging into a 12-city European tour - the BSO's first visit to this side of the Atlantic since 1987 - with an all-Brahms program conducted by music director Yuri Temirkanov on Thanksgiving Day at Glasgow Royal Concert Hall. The tour moves on this week to three midland British cities (concerts in Leeds and Birmingham are sold out)
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 10, 2001
For its 19th annual gala of socializing and fund-raising, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra put on a French accent Saturday evening. So did Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, which sported a Parisian flower stand and some energetic can-can dancers in the lobby. The interior of the theater was transformed into a massive restaurant for the occasion, with tables set up on platforms covering the main floor seating. Before the formally attired, highly coiffed crowd of patrons enjoyed cocktails, hors d'oeuvres and dinner, the BSO offered a short program of selections from Bizet's Carmen and Gounod's Faust, topped off with Gershwin's popular evocation of An American in Paris.
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