Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEuropean Parliament
IN THE NEWS

European Parliament

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1998
The National Security Agency has incurred the wrath of some U.S. allies and triggered debate about increased global eavesdropping, thanks to a new report that accuses the agency of spying on European citizens and companies.With the help of a listening post in the moors of northern England, NSA for nearly a decade has been snatching Europe's electronic communications signals, according to a report for the European Parliament."Within Europe, all e-mail, telephone and fax communications are routinely intercepted by the United States National Security Agency, transferring all target information to Fort Meade," said the report.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 31, 2014
While tea party candidates underperformed against establishment Republican incumbents in recent U.S. primary elections, in Europe their conservative cousins have just scored some spectacular victories. Commentators are calling elections for seats in the European Parliament and local council seats in Britain a "political earthquake" and "revolution" as strongly conservative candidates made significant gains. In Britain, the UK Independent Party (UKIP) outperformed the established Conservative, Labour and Liberal Democrat parties.
Advertisement
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 23, 2000
MINSK, Belarus - Saying that Europe is poised between "hope and fear" over the future of democracy in Belarus, a delegation from the European Parliament severely criticized yesterday President Aleksandr Lukashenko's assault on his political opponents and threatened to withhold a team of observers for elections he is trying to orchestrate for the fall. The election struggle puts the country of 10 million between Russia and Poland at a crucial junction. Lukashenko is seeking to restore the legitimacy of his hard-line nationalist government after he disbanded a democratically elected parliament in 1996, installed his own rump parliament and extended his term to 2001 in a referendum that was widely condemned as rigged.
NEWS
By David W. Wise | May 27, 2014
This year marks the passage of one century since of the start of the First World War. It is the year that will mark the 75th anniversary of the Nazi invasion of Poland, which launched the Second World War. It is also the year that will mark a quarter of a century since the fall of the Berlin Wall. The two world wars were catastrophic events in which Europe, motivated by parochial interests and fears, divided up against itself and unleashed the greatest violence ever known in history, resulting in the deaths of 76 million.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 10, 1999
LONDON -- The 71-year-old former diva of Italian films, Gina Lollobrigida, is a candidate but seems unsure why. So is the Irish winner of the Eurovision Song Contest, who goes only by the name Dana. They are among 2,000 of both new and known politicians seeking election this week to the 626-member European Parliament, the world's first and only experiment in transnational democracy. Voters will go to the polls today in Britain, Denmark and the Netherlands, tomorrow in Ireland and Sunday in the 11 other European Union nations.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 5, 2000
PARIS - A French prosecutor has begun a preliminary investigation into whether the U.S. global surveillance system, which listens in on millions of telephone calls, faxes and electronic messages each day, is a threat to French well-being. The prosecutor, Jean-Pierre Dintilhac, has ordered France's counterintelligence agency, DST, to appraise the actions of the system, Echelon. The system links computers in at least seven sites around the world to receive, analyze and sort information captured from satellite communications.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,Chicago Tribune | February 15, 2007
WARSAW, Poland -- A contentious report that accuses 14 European nations of being complicit in more than 1,200 CIA flights that were used to shuttle terrorist suspects to secret prisons around the world was adopted yesterday by the European Parliament. The vote in Strasbourg, France, was 382-256, with 74 abstentions. Parliamentarians who supported the resolution said the report exposed how European governments had turned a blind eye to human rights violations. Many of those who voted against it said the 76-page report was short on hard evidence and seemed to display an anti-American bias.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 15, 1999
DUBLIN, Ireland -- The dispute over Ireland's virtual ban on abortion accelerated yesterday as four women who represent the country in the European Parliament accused the government of negligence in delaying a statement of its policy on the issue.The women, among Ireland's 16-member delegation to the parliament in Strasbourg, France, said on national radio that they had voted in favor of a European Union measure that would permit abortion in cases of rape and where the life or health of a mother is endangered.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Paris Bureau of The Sun | January 23, 1991
PARIS -- The European Parliament suspended nearly $1.5 billion in food and technical aid to the Soviet Union yesterday, delivering a stern condemnation of Soviet repression in Lithuania and Latvia.The parliament's decision to withhold approval of the aid package came a week after European Community foreign ministers warned Moscow against further military crackdowns in the Baltics, following the Jan. 13 deaths of 14 people in the army takeover of a broadcast center in Vilnius, Lithuania.Last weekend, the Soviet army killed five more people when it stormed Riga police headquarters in a drive to reassert control of Latvia.
NEWS
June 15, 1994
Don't count Helmut Kohl out yet. The German chancellor's Christian Democrats dealt a harsh blow to polls and pundits by coming in first in the elections to the European Parliament with roughly 39 percent of the German vote against some 33 percent for Social Democrats.The European Parliament is a monthly talk shop in Strasbourg with gradually increasing powers (from minuscule to somewhat more) in the European Union (formerly Common Market and European Community). Its elections are watched partly to show international swings of opinion but also as domestic referendums within each country.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | October 24, 2008
Blast in Afghanistan kills 3 coalition soldiers KABUL, Afghanistan: A roadside bomb killed three soldiers from the U.S-led coalition in western Afghanistan, while 18 Taliban fighters died in clashes elsewhere in the country, officials said yesterday. The bomb that struck the U.S. coalition vehicle Wednesday also wounded another coalition member, the U.S. military said in a statement. In the southern Kandahar province, a bomb placed on a donkey hit a police vehicle patrolling west of the provincial capital, killing an officer and wounding two other people, said Officer Sadullah Khan.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporter | April 22, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Assistant Secretary of State Ellen R. Sauerbrey, whose socially conservative views came in for scrutiny when President Bush picked her for the diplomatic post, is being criticized for her plan to speak at a conference in Poland for opponents of abortion and same-sex marriage. Nineteen members of the European Parliament have asked Sauerbrey to reconsider her scheduled appearance at the World Congress of Families next month in Warsaw. The members of the European Parliamentary Working Group on Separation of Religion and Politics say that several people scheduled to speak at the three-day conference have taken positions that clash with the European Charter of Fundamental Rights.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,Chicago Tribune | February 15, 2007
WARSAW, Poland -- A contentious report that accuses 14 European nations of being complicit in more than 1,200 CIA flights that were used to shuttle terrorist suspects to secret prisons around the world was adopted yesterday by the European Parliament. The vote in Strasbourg, France, was 382-256, with 74 abstentions. Parliamentarians who supported the resolution said the report exposed how European governments had turned a blind eye to human rights violations. Many of those who voted against it said the 76-page report was short on hard evidence and seemed to display an anti-American bias.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 31, 2006
PARIS --The European Union's highest court ruled yesterday that the EU had overstepped its authority by agreeing to give the United States personal details about airline passengers on flights to America in an effort to fight terrorism. The decision will force the two sides to renegotiate the deal at a time of heightened concerns about possible infringements of civil liberties by the Bush administration in its campaign against terrorism, and the extent to which European governments have cooperated.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 4, 2003
BERLIN - After a barrage of criticism, Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi apologized yesterday for likening a German member of the European Parliament to a Nazi. In a call to German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, who earlier in the day had demanded an apology from Berlusconi, the Italian leader said he was sorry for the offense. But he added that he had been offended by the member of Parliament, Martin Schulz, who had criticized his conduct as prime minister. "During a telephone conversation with the German chancellor, the prime minister told him about the serious affront that he faced in the European Parliament yesterday," a statement from Berlusconi's office said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 5, 2000
PARIS - A French prosecutor has begun a preliminary investigation into whether the U.S. global surveillance system, which listens in on millions of telephone calls, faxes and electronic messages each day, is a threat to French well-being. The prosecutor, Jean-Pierre Dintilhac, has ordered France's counterintelligence agency, DST, to appraise the actions of the system, Echelon. The system links computers in at least seven sites around the world to receive, analyze and sort information captured from satellite communications.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 4, 2003
BERLIN - After a barrage of criticism, Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi apologized yesterday for likening a German member of the European Parliament to a Nazi. In a call to German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, who earlier in the day had demanded an apology from Berlusconi, the Italian leader said he was sorry for the offense. But he added that he had been offended by the member of Parliament, Martin Schulz, who had criticized his conduct as prime minister. "During a telephone conversation with the German chancellor, the prime minister told him about the serious affront that he faced in the European Parliament yesterday," a statement from Berlusconi's office said.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | January 15, 1999
LONDON -- In the most dramatic showdown ever between the European Union's elected representatives and its appointed officials, the politicians blinked yesterday, leaving the unelected bureaucrats in control of the institution.Lawmakers in the 626-member European Parliament in Strasbourg, France, had threatened to fire the 20-member commission that administers the EU from Brussels, Belgium, on the grounds that the some of the bureaucrats had engaged in massive fraud and then impeded efforts to ferret out the corruption.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 23, 2000
MINSK, Belarus - Saying that Europe is poised between "hope and fear" over the future of democracy in Belarus, a delegation from the European Parliament severely criticized yesterday President Aleksandr Lukashenko's assault on his political opponents and threatened to withhold a team of observers for elections he is trying to orchestrate for the fall. The election struggle puts the country of 10 million between Russia and Poland at a crucial junction. Lukashenko is seeking to restore the legitimacy of his hard-line nationalist government after he disbanded a democratically elected parliament in 1996, installed his own rump parliament and extended his term to 2001 in a referendum that was widely condemned as rigged.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | July 11, 1999
PARIS -- Does the right have a future? After being out of the White House for seven years, the Republican Party senses that it has a good chance to regain control of the executive branch. Thus, the phenomenal $36 million in campaign money raised already by Texas Gov. George W. Bush, the GOP's front-runner.The major European parties of the right have no such dream. Not only are they out, but also in Britain and France, they are down and demoralized. The German Christian Democrats are holding up in public opinion against the divided and frequently incoherent coalition government of Social Democrats and Greens of Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, but elections are distant.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.