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NEWS
By Elizabeth Pond | October 9, 1996
BONN -- True, German Chancellor Helmut Kohl has dropped his dream of European political union for now. True, he doesn't expect much from the Intergovernmental Conference that for a sleepy half-year had been trying to beef up the powers of the European Union center.Yet it would be a mistake to write off political ''deepening'' of the European Union as a failure, as much British and American commentary has done. Nor should observers conclude that Europe's senior statesman has given up on trying to crown German unification with ''irreversible'' European integration.
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NEWS
June 13, 2001
WHEN THE statesmen of Europe agreed to enlarge the 15-member European Union to a possible 27 nations, they provided that, in the future, no little nation could thwart the will of all. The change from unanimity to weighted majority rule was one of the compromises worked out last December in the Treaty of Nice. It changes the EU's institutions and writes the rules for considering 12 applicants from Eastern and Central Europe. All that remains is ratification, by the predictable parliaments of 14 member nations, and by unpredictable referendum in Ireland.
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BUSINESS
May 18, 1992
The World Trade Center Institute and the Mid-Atlantic Council of International Organizations will present a series of seminars on world trade May 18-22. Here is a summary of the events. For complete registration, location and cost information, contact the Baltimore-based institute at 576-0022.Today: Europe8:30 a.m. -- Doing Business in EuropeNoon -- Luncheon1 p.m. -- European Integration -- 1992: How Can U.S. Firms Meet the Challenge?6 p.m. -- Gala dinnerTomorrow: International Business11 a.m. -- Baltimore County Chamber of Commerce Business-To-Business Trade ShowNoon -- International trade luncheon5:30 p.m. -- International business reception aboard Pride of Baltimore IIWednesday: Maryland and the Global Economy9 a.m. -- International trade seminar: Air and Freight Documentation, Title Transfer and Insurance10 a.m. -- Embassy Day (Continues until 10 p.m.)
NEWS
By William Pfaff | February 7, 2000
PARIS -- The European Union's reaction to the Haider affair in Austria expresses fine sentiments about democracy but offends the fundamental democratic principle that the popular will, expressed in an election, deserves respect. Great pressure was placed on Austria to block the government coalition, announced last Thursday, between Joerg Haider's right-wing Austrian Freedom Party and the mainstream conservative People's Party. This was the only governing coalition on offer, since the People's Party and the Social Democrats failed to agree to form a government.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Paris Bureau of The Sun | November 23, 1990
PARIS -- European leaders reacted yesterday with obligatory homage to British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher on the day of her resignation but made little secret of their hope that her successor would propel Britain into European integration.Mrs. Thatcher's resistance to that integration, which she most recently and most scathingly turned away from at the European Community summit in Rome a month ago, was the immediate cause of her downfall. At the European Community offices in Brussels, Belgium, champagne reportedly flowed in celebration of the prime minister's downfall.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 26, 1994
CORFU, Greece -- The European Union summit broke up in disarray yesterday with Britain, the Continent's traditional maverick, standing alone against its 11 partners on the choice of a successor to Jacques Delors, the president of the European Commission and one of the Continent's most influential power brokers.The debacle left an impression of a body that, rather than exemplifying pan-European ideals, is again faltering because of the individual political agendas of its members."I believe I have come to the right decision, and I will not change it," British Prime Minister John Major told European leaders when they met yesterday in a final, vain attempt to persuade him to accept Belgian Prime Minister Jean-Luc Dehaene for the post.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 12, 1999
BERLIN -- Marking a clear break with the caution of German foreign policy since World War II, Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder has laid out a new vision of his country's international role, describing Germany as "a great power in Europe" that will not hesitate to pursue its national interests.The new definition of German foreign policy, spelled out by Schroeder in an article in the last edition of the monthly review of German unions, appears to signal the formal end of Germany's self-imposed reserve since 1945, even as it underscores the country's irreversible attachment to NATO and the European Union.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | June 20, 1994
The 20th century's most original and successful attempt to overcome the destructive consequences of nationalism is the European Community, now the European Union. Nationalism's domination of recent history has provoked three liberal and two totalitarian attempts to establish a new international order. The totalitarian ones were communism and nazism. The liberal ones have been the League of Nations, the United Nations and ''Europe.''The League collapsed. The United Nations is not in a particularly reassuring condition -- doing much that is useful and admirable but remaining in all large matters the creature of the major powers.
NEWS
By IAN JOHNSON | September 15, 1991
Berlin -- Part of the European Community's non-stop ad campaign to sell itself to its citizens is a series of billboards showing three well-dressed young people with varying shades of skin color. Their arms are on one another's shoulders as they dance something resembling the can-can. A huge title, "Europe Becomes One," explains the millenarian message of Euro-harmony and prosperity.With the coming of 1993, when the EC's economic borders fall and the world's largest single market of 345 million people is created, one wonders why such campaigns are necessary.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | February 7, 2000
PARIS -- The European Union's reaction to the Haider affair in Austria expresses fine sentiments about democracy but offends the fundamental democratic principle that the popular will, expressed in an election, deserves respect. Great pressure was placed on Austria to block the government coalition, announced last Thursday, between Joerg Haider's right-wing Austrian Freedom Party and the mainstream conservative People's Party. This was the only governing coalition on offer, since the People's Party and the Social Democrats failed to agree to form a government.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 12, 1999
BERLIN -- Marking a clear break with the caution of German foreign policy since World War II, Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder has laid out a new vision of his country's international role, describing Germany as "a great power in Europe" that will not hesitate to pursue its national interests.The new definition of German foreign policy, spelled out by Schroeder in an article in the last edition of the monthly review of German unions, appears to signal the formal end of Germany's self-imposed reserve since 1945, even as it underscores the country's irreversible attachment to NATO and the European Union.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Pond | October 9, 1996
BONN -- True, German Chancellor Helmut Kohl has dropped his dream of European political union for now. True, he doesn't expect much from the Intergovernmental Conference that for a sleepy half-year had been trying to beef up the powers of the European Union center.Yet it would be a mistake to write off political ''deepening'' of the European Union as a failure, as much British and American commentary has done. Nor should observers conclude that Europe's senior statesman has given up on trying to crown German unification with ''irreversible'' European integration.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 26, 1994
CORFU, Greece -- The European Union summit broke up in disarray yesterday with Britain, the Continent's traditional maverick, standing alone against its 11 partners on the choice of a successor to Jacques Delors, the president of the European Commission and one of the Continent's most influential power brokers.The debacle left an impression of a body that, rather than exemplifying pan-European ideals, is again faltering because of the individual political agendas of its members."I believe I have come to the right decision, and I will not change it," British Prime Minister John Major told European leaders when they met yesterday in a final, vain attempt to persuade him to accept Belgian Prime Minister Jean-Luc Dehaene for the post.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | June 20, 1994
The 20th century's most original and successful attempt to overcome the destructive consequences of nationalism is the European Community, now the European Union. Nationalism's domination of recent history has provoked three liberal and two totalitarian attempts to establish a new international order. The totalitarian ones were communism and nazism. The liberal ones have been the League of Nations, the United Nations and ''Europe.''The League collapsed. The United Nations is not in a particularly reassuring condition -- doing much that is useful and admirable but remaining in all large matters the creature of the major powers.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH POND | January 9, 1994
Bonn. -- Once upon a time, back in the days after World War II, there were prophets in the land.They thought of themselves only as tinkerers, improvising to stave off an immediate Soviet threat. But as it turned out, the institutions these statesmen crafted lasted for half a century and withstood all the buffeting of the Cold War and a nuclear balance of terror.In Europe, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization provided the shield behind which a novel cooperative system of ever-freer trade and European integration could develop.
NEWS
By MARK M. NELSON AND THOMAS OMESTAD | May 9, 1993
Amid Washington's disgust over the continuing tragedy in Bosnia, the search for scapegoats has begun.From the beginning, the United States considered Yugoslavia's break-up a "European problem," a recognition of the European Community's growing ambition to lead. Now, the verdict among American pundits is in: The European Community has failed its ** first post-Cold War test, and its drive for unity and global power status has been exposed as little more than an empty pretense. The implication is that the Europeans either can't get their act together or are a cowardly bunch of appeasers.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | September 27, 1991
LONDON -- The road to European economic and political unity has never been smooth, but Prime Minister John Major raised the ZTC possibility yesterday that it might come to a dead end in just two months, at least as far as Britain is concerned.Although he has not said so publicly, his office has let it be known that Britain might veto a treaty on European unity, scheduled to be signed by the 12-nation European Community in Maastricht, Netherlands, in December.If that happens, the entire process of European integration, started more than 30 years ago with the signing of the Treaty of Rome in 1957, will grind to a halt or limp along without Britain, and possibly without some other members as well.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | November 26, 1992
Paris. -- Who would have thought Europe so fragile, or so fatally reckless? The demons of racism and nationalism have reappeared with flash and thunder. Two children and a Turkish woman were murdered this week in the town of Moelln, in Germany, latest victims of the series of neo-Nazi attacks on foreigners that have been going on for the past year.Ten days earlier a German commercial traveler was beaten to death and burned because his attackers thought -- wrongly -- that he was a Jew. Fifteen have died in Germany in such affairs since January, more than the Red Brigades killed in the whole of their sordid, decade-long career.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | November 26, 1992
Paris. -- Who would have thought Europe so fragile, or so fatally reckless? The demons of racism and nationalism have reappeared with flash and thunder. Two children and a Turkish woman were murdered this week in the town of Moelln, in Germany, latest victims of the series of neo-Nazi attacks on foreigners that have been going on for the past year.Ten days earlier a German commercial traveler was beaten to death and burned because his attackers thought -- wrongly -- that he was a Jew. Fifteen have died in Germany in such affairs since January, more than the Red Brigades killed in the whole of their sordid, decade-long career.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | September 17, 1992
LONDON -- The jitters aroused in Europe by fear the Maastricht treaty might be rejected in France in a referendum Sunday have been playing havoc in currency markets across the continent.But the pound, because it is one of the most widely traded currencies, has been a special target of money speculators. Prime Minister John Major and his finance minister, Norman Lamont, had pledged to defend it and stave off devaluation at all costs, despite assertions from some financial experts that the currency was overvalued.
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