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NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Staff | February 18, 2007
Moscow -- It can take as many as eight years for a case to journey, from start to finish, through the halls of justice at the European Court of Human Rights, where some 90,000 complaints are pending. Yet a plan designed to streamline the court's operation has stalled on Russia's doorstep. The nation is the lone holdout, among the 46 countries in the Council of Europe, in ratifying 2 1/2 -year-old reform measures that supporters say are badly needed to address the mounting caseload at the chronically overburdened court.
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NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Staff | February 18, 2007
Moscow -- It can take as many as eight years for a case to journey, from start to finish, through the halls of justice at the European Court of Human Rights, where some 90,000 complaints are pending. Yet a plan designed to streamline the court's operation has stalled on Russia's doorstep. The nation is the lone holdout, among the 46 countries in the Council of Europe, in ratifying 2 1/2 -year-old reform measures that supporters say are badly needed to address the mounting caseload at the chronically overburdened court.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 17, 1999
LONDON -- The European Court of Human Rights ruled yesterday that two 10-year-old boys who kidnapped and killed 2-year-old James Bulger in a Liverpool shopping center in 1993 had not received a fair trial in Britain.The judges said Jon Venables and Robert Thompson had been too young to take part effectively in a procedure meant for adults and that the home secretary at the time, Michael Howard, had erred in increasing their eight-year jail sentence to 15 years.The boys have served six years.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 13, 2006
MOSCOW -- The European Court of Human Rights ruled yesterday that Russian forces were responsible for the summary executions of a pregnant Chechen, her year-old son and three other family members during a military operation in 2000 that rights groups have called one of the worst massacres in the separatist conflict in Chechnya. At least 60 Chechen civilians were killed Feb. 5, 2000, during a mop-up operation by Russian forces in a suburb of Grozny, Chechnya's capital, days after Russian troops retook the city.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 26, 2002
PARIS - The European Court of Human Rights ruled yesterday that an aged Nazi collaborator, Maurice Papon, was denied a fair trial when France refused to allow him to appeal a 1998 conviction for war crimes stemming from his involvement in the wartime deportation of Jews to German death camps. Attorneys for Papon, 91, who is serving a 10-year sentence in La Sante prison in Paris, said they would take the case to France's highest appeals court and, in the meantime, would seek Papon's immediate release.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 13, 2006
MOSCOW -- The European Court of Human Rights ruled yesterday that Russian forces were responsible for the summary executions of a pregnant Chechen, her year-old son and three other family members during a military operation in 2000 that rights groups have called one of the worst massacres in the separatist conflict in Chechnya. At least 60 Chechen civilians were killed Feb. 5, 2000, during a mop-up operation by Russian forces in a suburb of Grozny, Chechnya's capital, days after Russian troops retook the city.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | August 27, 2006
MOSCOW -- Aleksei Mikheyev couldn't bear the torture; he simply wanted to die. He wanted to die so badly he flung himself out the second-story window of a police station in the Russian city of Nizhny Novgorod after being forced, he says, to confess to the rape and killing of a disappeared girl who turned up unharmed the very same day. Police affixed metal clips to Mikheyev's earlobes and administered electric shocks, according to his account. They threatened to beat him and apply electric current to his genitals.
NEWS
December 1, 1999
This is an edited excerpt of a Chicago Tribune editorial, which was published Monday. A TURKISH appeals court last week upheld the death sentence given to Kurdish separatist leader Abdullah Ocalan. For Turkey, the timing couldn't be worse. Turkey wants admission into the European Union, whose members all oppose the death penalty. The EU is expected to select Turkey as a candidate for membership when the organization meets in Helsinki this month. But the EU has bluntly warned that if Ocalan is executed, Turkey's chances for membership could be stifled.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 31, 2006
PARIS --The European Union's highest court ruled yesterday that the EU had overstepped its authority by agreeing to give the United States personal details about airline passengers on flights to America in an effort to fight terrorism. The decision will force the two sides to renegotiate the deal at a time of heightened concerns about possible infringements of civil liberties by the Bush administration in its campaign against terrorism, and the extent to which European governments have cooperated.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 7, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Justice Sandra Day O'Connor said yesterday that she would serve out the next term of the Supreme Court, dismissing speculation that she was ready to retire. In an unusual televised interview together with Justice Stephen G. Breyer, another of the court's centrists, O'Connor also denied long-standing reports that she had intended, in 2000, to retire unless Vice President Al Gore was elected president. The justices appeared on the ABC program This Week, an appearance that ABC said was the first by any sitting justice on the networks' Sunday morning interview programs.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | August 27, 2006
MOSCOW -- Aleksei Mikheyev couldn't bear the torture; he simply wanted to die. He wanted to die so badly he flung himself out the second-story window of a police station in the Russian city of Nizhny Novgorod after being forced, he says, to confess to the rape and killing of a disappeared girl who turned up unharmed the very same day. Police affixed metal clips to Mikheyev's earlobes and administered electric shocks, according to his account. They threatened to beat him and apply electric current to his genitals.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 31, 2006
PARIS --The European Union's highest court ruled yesterday that the EU had overstepped its authority by agreeing to give the United States personal details about airline passengers on flights to America in an effort to fight terrorism. The decision will force the two sides to renegotiate the deal at a time of heightened concerns about possible infringements of civil liberties by the Bush administration in its campaign against terrorism, and the extent to which European governments have cooperated.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 7, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Justice Sandra Day O'Connor said yesterday that she would serve out the next term of the Supreme Court, dismissing speculation that she was ready to retire. In an unusual televised interview together with Justice Stephen G. Breyer, another of the court's centrists, O'Connor also denied long-standing reports that she had intended, in 2000, to retire unless Vice President Al Gore was elected president. The justices appeared on the ABC program This Week, an appearance that ABC said was the first by any sitting justice on the networks' Sunday morning interview programs.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 27, 2002
FRANKFURT, Germany - Seeking to channel its energy into uncovering price-fixing schemes and breaking up cartels, the European Union approved yesterday a landmark overhaul of its antitrust laws. The new laws, adopted by a vote of the economics ministers of the union's 15 member nations, will shift much of the responsibility for regulating ties among companies away from the European Commission and back to individual countries and their courts. Freed from the burden of having to review and approve every proposed joint venture or strategic alliance, authorities in Brussels, Belgium, will be able to concentrate on attacking illegal cartels, which still skew competition in Europe.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 26, 2002
PARIS - The European Court of Human Rights ruled yesterday that an aged Nazi collaborator, Maurice Papon, was denied a fair trial when France refused to allow him to appeal a 1998 conviction for war crimes stemming from his involvement in the wartime deportation of Jews to German death camps. Attorneys for Papon, 91, who is serving a 10-year sentence in La Sante prison in Paris, said they would take the case to France's highest appeals court and, in the meantime, would seek Papon's immediate release.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 17, 1999
LONDON -- The European Court of Human Rights ruled yesterday that two 10-year-old boys who kidnapped and killed 2-year-old James Bulger in a Liverpool shopping center in 1993 had not received a fair trial in Britain.The judges said Jon Venables and Robert Thompson had been too young to take part effectively in a procedure meant for adults and that the home secretary at the time, Michael Howard, had erred in increasing their eight-year jail sentence to 15 years.The boys have served six years.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 27, 2002
FRANKFURT, Germany - Seeking to channel its energy into uncovering price-fixing schemes and breaking up cartels, the European Union approved yesterday a landmark overhaul of its antitrust laws. The new laws, adopted by a vote of the economics ministers of the union's 15 member nations, will shift much of the responsibility for regulating ties among companies away from the European Commission and back to individual countries and their courts. Freed from the burden of having to review and approve every proposed joint venture or strategic alliance, authorities in Brussels, Belgium, will be able to concentrate on attacking illegal cartels, which still skew competition in Europe.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | May 9, 1996
LONDON -- A French civil servant in Brussels once said that the two crucial dates in European history were June 18, 1815, when Britain, at Waterloo, ended "the first serious attempt to unify Europe," and January 1, 1973, when Britain joined the European Community and set out "to put an end to the second attempt."A quarter-century later, the struggle against European unity rages in Britain, but rather than end Europe's unification it is likely to promote it, either by driving Britain completely out of the European Union, or by relegating it to Europe's outer circles, where it can be ignored by the other European powers.
NEWS
December 1, 1999
This is an edited excerpt of a Chicago Tribune editorial, which was published Monday. A TURKISH appeals court last week upheld the death sentence given to Kurdish separatist leader Abdullah Ocalan. For Turkey, the timing couldn't be worse. Turkey wants admission into the European Union, whose members all oppose the death penalty. The EU is expected to select Turkey as a candidate for membership when the organization meets in Helsinki this month. But the EU has bluntly warned that if Ocalan is executed, Turkey's chances for membership could be stifled.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 28, 1999
LONDON -- Discharged from the British military because they are gay, three men and a woman spent five years seeking justice, equality and the right to serve their country in war.Yesterday they won a landmark case as Britain's ban on homosexuals serving in the military was ruled illegal by the European Human Rights Court in Strasbourg, France.Though the ruling is not binding on Britain, Defense Secretary George Robertson said the government would accept the judgment and had suspended pending disciplinary cases against homosexuals.
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