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By Thomas Frank and Thomas Frank,NEWSDAY | November 26, 2004
WASHINGTON - An effort to improve the security of passports is facing delays by European countries that say they cannot meet a deadline the United States imposed shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks. Jonathan Faull, director general of the European Commission, said this week that member countries probably would not be ready to begin issuing passports with biometric identifiers by October, as U.S. law requires. Congress mandated a biometric identifier such as a fingerprint on new passports issued by most European countries and other stable democracies such as New Zealand.
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NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,Los Angeles Times | January 4, 2009
MOSCOW - Fuel delivery to four European countries fell below normal yesterday as Russia's state gas monopoly withheld natural gas from neighboring Ukraine for the third consecutive day. Ukraine warned that its gas pipeline system could experience "serious disruptions" if a worsening price dispute isn't settled in 10 to 15 days, threatening shortfalls across Europe in the heart of winter. Flows of gas to Poland, Romania, Hungary and Bulgaria, all of which depend on pipelines that cross Ukraine, decreased yesterday, officials said.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 11, 1994
ESSEN, Germany -- Leaders of the 12 European Union nations agreed yesterday to begin open-ended discussions next month about membership for six Eastern European countries without setting a timetable for any of them to join.Top officials from all six Eastern European countries that now have association agreements with the European Union -- Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Romania, Bulgaria and Hungary -- met with the leaders at the Villa Hugel, a sprawling 19th-century hilltop palace.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,hanah.cho@baltsun.com | October 14, 2008
Stocks rallied yesterday to a huge comeback after suffering their worst week ever. The Dow Jones industrial average climbed 936 points - the biggest one-day gain in its 112-year history - as several countries took concerted steps to ease the financial crisis. All the major U.S. indexes rose more than 11 percent, with the Dow posting its best percentage-point gain in 21 years. The Standard & Poor's 500 index set a record for a one-day point gain and the largest one-day percentage jump since the 1930s.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 26, 1993
MOSCOW -- Russia's foreign intelligence service warned NATO yesterday that any move to incorporate Eastern European countries into the Western alliance would bring "fundamental" military countermeasures and heighten anti-Western sentiments.Some Eastern Europe countries that were once under Soviet domination, including Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic, have asked to join NATO. Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin reacted calmly in late August, but the military pushed him to reconsider, and Mr. Yeltsin wrote Western leaders on Sept.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 9, 1995
BERLIN, Germany -- At the United Nations conference on climate change last week, which called for a new accord to limit emissions of greenhouse gases, the debates revealed one striking difference between the northern European countries and the United States.Because the European countries are so much more thickly settled than the United States, there is a much higher consciousness here of the urgency of environmental problems and of the need for joint action to confront them.The political success of Green parties has awakened other parties, even some of the most conservative, to the importance that voters attach to environmental issues.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 9, 1995
BERLIN, Germany -- At the United Nations conference on climate change last week, which called for a new accord to limit emissions of greenhouse gases, the debates revealed one striking difference between the northern European countries and the United States.Because the European countries are so much more thickly settled than the United States, there is a much higher consciousness here of the urgency of environmental problems and of the need for joint action to confront them.The political success of Green parties has awakened other parties, even some of the most conservative, to the importance that voters attach to environmental issues.
NEWS
December 1, 1992
An unusual conference is taking place in Baltimore. Some 400 emerging political and economic leaders from 40 European countries are meeting with their American counterparts. They are pondering topics ranging from entrepreneurship, economic conversion, housing and health. They are also visiting sites and institutions of significance in the Baltimore-Washington region.The American Center for International Leadership, which moved its headquarters to Baltimore two years ago, has sponsored dozens of East-West exchanges since it was founded in 1985.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | May 26, 1994
LONDON -- Stocks and bonds tumbled across Europe yesterday amid growing concern that the long slide in interest rates is over even as some countries are struggling to get their economies moving again.In Germany, the Bundesbank was persuaded to cancel a regularly scheduled sale of government bonds after yields climbed 10 basis points to 6.80 percent, their highest level in almost a year."The Bundesbank just ran into a buyer's strike at these rates, and that's very worrying for the bond market," said Jouni Kokko, economist at S. G. Warburg.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 27, 1998
SKOPJE, Macedonia -- Seven southeastern European countries agreed yesterday to create a multinational military force that could be used for peacekeeping or aid operations in the Balkans and elsewhere.Three NATO allies -- Italy, Greece and Turkey -- joined Albania, Bulgaria, Macedonia and Romania in creating the force, which will be a brigade with 3,000 to 4,000 troops divided into 14 companies by the time it is ready, probably sometime next year.The countries' defense ministers signed a pact creating the force after meeting here in the Macedonian capital.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 21, 2006
PARIS --The shaky U.N.-brokered cease-fire in Lebanon suffered another blow yesterday when the European countries that have been called upon to provide the backbone of a peacekeeping force delayed a decision on committing troops until the mission is more clearly defined. Their reservations postponed any action on the force at least until Wednesday, when the European Union will take up the issue. Haunted by their experiences in Bosnia in the 1990s, when their forces were unable to stop widespread ethnic killing, European governments are insisting upon clarifying the chain of command and rules of engagement before plunging into the even greater complexities of the Middle East.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | June 19, 2005
So there is hope after all for the battered U.S. dollar. That's good news for Americans traveling to Europe or buying foreign goods because their money should go a bit further. Economic and political disarray has dropped the once-mighty euro to nine-month lows against the greenback. Much-ballyhooed European unity isn't all it was cracked up to be. You can thank the postponement by the United Kingdom of its vote on the proposed European Union constitution. Thank the "no" votes in France and the Netherlands, too. Now on hold, that measure must be ratified by all 25 member nations to go into effect.
NEWS
By Thomas Frank and Thomas Frank,NEWSDAY | November 26, 2004
WASHINGTON - An effort to improve the security of passports is facing delays by European countries that say they cannot meet a deadline the United States imposed shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks. Jonathan Faull, director general of the European Commission, said this week that member countries probably would not be ready to begin issuing passports with biometric identifiers by October, as U.S. law requires. Congress mandated a biometric identifier such as a fingerprint on new passports issued by most European countries and other stable democracies such as New Zealand.
TOPIC
By THE ECONOMIST | October 19, 2003
Pascal Lamy, a European commissioner from France, recently mused publicly about why some members of the European Union are more awkward to deal with than others. "We have to recognize," he said, "that there are some countries which remember that they were once great world powers and which believe that this was not an accident - that they still have special qualities that deserve recognition: France, Britain, Spain, Poland." At the mention of Poland, there was a snort of derision from a Hungarian in the audience.
NEWS
July 15, 2003
Nigeria regularly finds itself high up on any list of corrupt nations, helped along by the ever-successful worldwide scheme known as the "419," after the section of the Nigerian criminal code that targets the practice and makes it illegal. Typically, an intended victim receives an e-mail appeal. (The scheme reportedly began in Nigeria in the 1980s with handwritten letters, then evolved to faxed messages and finally e-mails.) The writer pretends to be someone famous, or well-placed or simply rich.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 8, 2003
PARIS - With a protest sign and a wide grin, Rachiol Boulaouane stepped out of the crowd of marching strikers last week and summed up the average French worker's view of the government's effort to solve a pension crisis that threatens to swallow the economy. "Something has to be done, yeah," said Boulaouane, 30, who cleans housing projects for the city, "but I don't want to keep working until I have no teeth." Like every French worker, public and private, Boulaouane labors 35 hours a week and gets at least five weeks of paid vacation a year.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Staff Writer | June 27, 1992
LISBON -- The war in what remains of Yugoslavia thrust itself onto the agenda of the European Community summit yesterday."We have been taken by the throat by what is happening to Yugoslavia," said French President Francois Mitterrand. It "demands strong action by the community."The EC is meeting in Lisbon to consider membership applications from several European countries and to find a formula to finance its activities. The leaders of the 12 EC countries also reappointed Jacques Delors to two more years as president of its European Commission.
NEWS
By Bob Kerrey | October 8, 1993
THE horror of American bodies being dragged through the streets of Somalia and the shock of Army Rangers being ambushed have left Americans furious and numb.The disaster has brought an understandable instant response Get our troops out now. However, as President Clinton said yesterday, before a hurried pullout, we must think hard about the meaning of what we're doing in Somalia.Nobody argues we should stay in Somalia any longer than minimally necessary. But the way we leave is crucial. We will not leave Mogadishu until we get our hostages back and every American serviceman is accounted for. Beyond that, the Somalis don't have anything we want.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 9, 2003
BRUSSELS, Belgium - Corine Devillers sells a varied lot. Little flags on skinny sticks are for sale next to sweat shirts folded on shelves, hats hanging on pegs, pencils resting in cases, posters stuck to walls and tiny stuffed bears snuggling in the windows. In many ways, though, she is selling only one product: white elephants. She works on the edge of the Grand Place, one of Europe's most impressive public squares, at a shop called Eurostore. The flags, the shirts, the hats - virtually everything she sells - are adorned with a circle of 15 stars, the emblem of the European Union, itself a symbol of European unity, something that no longer exists.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill | May 30, 1999
ON WEDNESDAY, when South Africans go to the polls for their second nationwide democratic election, their country will start learning the answer to the question that has been asked for more than five years: What happens after Mandela?From the moment Nelson Mandela walked out of Victor Verster prison near Cape Town in 1990, his ascension to the leadership of whatever nation emerged from the ruins of apartheid seemed certain. When he not only lived up to but surpassed the image of Nelson Mandela constructed by his supporters during his 27 years in prison, his presidency of the new government became inevitable.
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