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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 22, 2000
BRUSSELS, Belgium - The European Commission is planning to merge its latest investigation into Microsoft Corp.'s practices with an antitrust case that it opened against the company in 1998, lawyers here said yesterday. A consolidation would not only speed up the legal process, it would also strengthen the commission's case against Microsoft, antitrust lawyers said. The first investigation by European regulators into Microsoft began in 1998, after a complaint from Sun Microsystems Inc. The commission, the administrative arm of the European Union, started proceedings based on accusations that Microsoft abused its dominant position in the market for personal computer operating systems.
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NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | September 13, 2012
It would seem that we're now at the stage of global economic lunacy where the worldwide socialist slide is so far gone that the president of Russia is lecturing the world, and particularly Europe, about the risks of socialism. Speaking at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation conference in Vladivostok, Russia, Vladimir Putin promoted the merits of free-market economics. He said that by pulling the former Soviet satellite states into its sphere after the fall of the Iron Curtain, Europe chose to take responsibility for subsidizing their economic well-being.
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NEWS
July 29, 1997
A TRADE WAR was averted recently when the Boeing Co. of Seattle made a key concession on marketing within the U.S. to the European Commission. The 15-member European Union will now approve the giant civil airliner manufacturer's merger with the defense giant, McDonnell Douglas. Phone calls by President Clinton helped. But Americans may wonder what business a European supra-government has approving a merger of two American firms.One answer is that this was payback. Egged on by French President Jacques Chirac, this was partly a response to Congress' sanctions against foreign firms for trading with Cuba or investing in Libya's or Iran's oil industry.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2009
AirTran adding BWI flights to Bahamas, Jamaica AirTran Airways announced Thursday schedules for new service to Nassau, Bahamas, and Montego Bay, Jamaica, including nonstop flights to BWI Marshall Airport. The flights will start Dec. 17 to Nassau and Feb. 11 to Montego Bay, pending government approval. BWI will have one daily flight to Montego Bay and two Nassau flights with service four days a week. The Florida-based airline filed applications last month with the U.S. Department of Transportation to begin offering service to the Caribbean.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 30, 1997
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- European Commission auditors say they have uncovered evidence that the Bosnian federal treasury is losing tens of millions of dollars a year to two fraud schemes -- one operated by Bosnian Muslim officials and the other by criminal gangs that are run by Croats and Serbs.The gangs, diplomats say, operate in league with Bosnian Serb leaders.The effect has been to channel funds away from the weak federal government and to the rival ethnic leaderships that are keeping Bosnia divided.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 31, 1999
BRUSSELS -- AT&T Corp. and British Telecommunications PLC won European Union approval yesterday for their planned $3 billion joint venture after the biggest U.S. long-distance phone company agreed to reduce its U.K. operations. AT&T will sell its ACC long-distance phone unit in the United Kingdom and take steps to ensure that it does not use its 22 percent stake in Telewest Communications PLC to have an unfair advantage in the U.K. market, said the European Commission, the EU's executive agency.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 6, 1996
LONDON -- The European Union partly lifted a ban on British beef yesterday, but the action failed to defuse Britain's "mad cow" war against its closest trading partners.European Commission President Jacques Santer told community leaders in Brussels, Belgium, that he hoped the action would lead Britain to abandon its policy of blocking all measures before EU bodies in protest of the ban. But the government of Prime Minister John Major indicated that the British offensive would continue until a full lifting of the export prohibitions.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 12, 2001
BRUSSELS - Vodafone Group PLC, Europe's largest mobile phone company, and eight rivals were raided by European antitrust officials yesterday in search of evidence of price fixing for calls between networks in Germany and the United Kingdom. The European Commission said it suspects "collective price fixing" by wireless companies in the two countries. "The inspections also aim to verify whether German operators have illegally fixed the wholesale prices they charge to other operators," the commission said in a statement.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Staff Writer | June 27, 1992
LISBON -- The war in what remains of Yugoslavia thrust itself onto the agenda of the European Community summit yesterday."We have been taken by the throat by what is happening to Yugoslavia," said French President Francois Mitterrand. It "demands strong action by the community."The EC is meeting in Lisbon to consider membership applications from several European countries and to find a formula to finance its activities. The leaders of the 12 EC countries also reappointed Jacques Delors to two more years as president of its European Commission.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 26, 2005
BRUSSELS - The European Union has given China until Tuesday to curb the flood of its textile exports to Europe or face a formal trade dispute, with the possible re-imposition of protectionist quotas on some goods as soon as June 15, the European Commission said yesterday. The European Union's trade commissioner, Peter Mandelson, and China's chief trade negotiator, Gao Hucheng, failed to defuse the dispute during a meeting in Brussels late Tuesday. Senior aides to the two parties continued talks yesterday, said Claude Viron-Riville, the trade spokeswoman at the European Commission, the executive arm of the European Union.
BUSINESS
By Shelley Emling and Shelley Emling,Cox News Service | May 13, 2008
LONDON - In what would be a major boost for the U.S. poultry industry, the European Union appears close to lifting its 11-year-old ban on imports of American poultry. Some trade experts say an announcement could come as early as today after a meeting of the Transatlantic Economic Council in Brussels, Belgium. Others say it's more likely an announcement will come next month at a formal U.S.-EU summit in Slovenia. The expected decision would open up a market worth at least $200 million, and perhaps much more, to U.S. poultry farmers.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | January 30, 2008
I cringed when I read recently that the Food and Drug Administration had declared that food from cloned animals is safe to eat. Could this mean I would have to struggle with yet another decision about what to put on my dinner table? Already I wrestle with whether my seafood is sustainable, my coffee is shade-grown and my beer is organic. But the more I looked into this matter, the more I realized that I was not going to have to take any quick stance about whether to serve cloned burgers for supper.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2005
Ryland Group names John Meade as head of Baltimore division The Ryland Group Inc. has named John Meade president of its Baltimore division. Meade, a 23-year Ryland veteran, most recently was vice president of finance in the Baltimore division, where he oversaw all financial activities and land acquisition analysis, and played a lead role in the division's strategic and day-to-day operations. Meade began his career in 1981 as a staff auditor at Price Waterhouse in Baltimore. After joining Ryland as a senior internal auditor in 1982, he held various positions, including division and region controller.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 13, 2005
BRUSSELS, Belgium - The European Commission turned up the heat in its antitrust investigation of Intel yesterday, conducting unannounced visits to the company's offices around Europe, a commission spokesman said. Besides the early visits to Intel offices, commission officials also conducted dawn raids on computer makers and retailers, seeking evidence that Intel, the world's No. 1 chip maker, has been abusing a rebate program intended to keep PC makers from buying chips from Intel's competitors.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 26, 2005
BRUSSELS - The European Union has given China until Tuesday to curb the flood of its textile exports to Europe or face a formal trade dispute, with the possible re-imposition of protectionist quotas on some goods as soon as June 15, the European Commission said yesterday. The European Union's trade commissioner, Peter Mandelson, and China's chief trade negotiator, Gao Hucheng, failed to defuse the dispute during a meeting in Brussels late Tuesday. Senior aides to the two parties continued talks yesterday, said Claude Viron-Riville, the trade spokeswoman at the European Commission, the executive arm of the European Union.
TOPIC
By Steven Philip Kramer and Steven Philip Kramer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 2005
Labor has won the May 5 elections, and Tony Blair has been returned to power in Great Britain. But another European vote, scheduled this month in France, could have a more politically explosive outcome. Polls show that French voters could reject the proposed European Constitution in a May 29 referendum. This would likely lead to months, or even years, of turmoil as the Europeans attempt to put their plans for a closer political union back on track. Even if the French vote to approve the constitution, there's still significant trouble on the horizon.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2009
AirTran adding BWI flights to Bahamas, Jamaica AirTran Airways announced Thursday schedules for new service to Nassau, Bahamas, and Montego Bay, Jamaica, including nonstop flights to BWI Marshall Airport. The flights will start Dec. 17 to Nassau and Feb. 11 to Montego Bay, pending government approval. BWI will have one daily flight to Montego Bay and two Nassau flights with service four days a week. The Florida-based airline filed applications last month with the U.S. Department of Transportation to begin offering service to the Caribbean.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 19, 2004
BRUSSELS, Belgium - Microsoft Corp. and European Union regulators have failed in last-ditch talks to agree on an antitrust settlement, opening the way for restrictions on the software giant's Windows operating system. "We made substantial progress toward resolving the problems that had arisen in the past, but we were unable to agree on commitments for future conduct," the European Union competition commissioner, Mario Monti, said yesterday. "It was impossible to achieve a satisfactory result in terms of setting a precedent."
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 19, 2004
BRUSSELS, Belgium - Microsoft Corp. and European Union regulators have failed in last-ditch talks to agree on an antitrust settlement, opening the way for restrictions on the software giant's Windows operating system. "We made substantial progress toward resolving the problems that had arisen in the past, but we were unable to agree on commitments for future conduct," the European Union competition commissioner, Mario Monti, said yesterday. "It was impossible to achieve a satisfactory result in terms of setting a precedent."
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | March 16, 2004
LONDON - Europe's antitrust watchdogs showed their teeth yesterday, unanimously approving a draft ruling that would force Microsoft Corp. to make major changes in its software and business practices. The vote by representatives of 15 European Union governments clears the way - unless talks produce a last-minute settlement - for the European Commission to declare next week that the world's largest software company is an abusive monopolist. The commission is the EU's administrative arm. Such a ruling could affect Microsoft's bottom line.
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