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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
On May 7, 1945, sixty-nine years ago, Col. Gen. Alfred Jodl affixed his name to the instrument of surrender and the war in Europe was over.  Price Day of The Baltimore Sun witnessed that quiet, somber ceremony, the only staff correspondent of an individual newspaper to be present at the German surrender. It was a little less than a year since British, American, and Canadian troops had stormed the beaches of Normandy, and Price Day was one of a handful of Sun correspondents who followed the troops from Normandy to German soil.  There is nothing novel about embedded reporters.
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NEWS
August 1, 2014
Commentator Jules Witcover writes that President Obama "needs to put a bit of John Wayne in his words" vis-a-vis his handling of Russia over the Malaysian Airlines tragedy ( "The Obama doctrine under fire," July 25). Mr. Witcover acknowledges that interventionism may not be the best idea. But what is to be gained from a disparity between the president's words and actions he doesn't venture to say. The airliner was flying from Europe with primarily European passengers aboard.
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By Rick Stevesrick@ricksteves.com | June 9, 2011
Last summer, while traveling in England, I went on a hike through the Cotswolds countryside. The two-hour trek took me from the charming hill town of Stow-on-the-Wold, through the villages of Lower and Upper Slaughter to Bourton-on-the-Water, the "Venice of the Cotswolds. " Along the way, I caught backyard glimpses of farms in action, ducks rudely swimming butt-up in mill ponds, rabbits popping up in fields videogame-style, ancient wind-sculpted trees, wet and slippery kissing gates, and slender slate church spires marking distant villages where I knew a hot cup of tea was waiting.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 31, 2014
While tea party candidates underperformed against establishment Republican incumbents in recent U.S. primary elections, in Europe their conservative cousins have just scored some spectacular victories. Commentators are calling elections for seats in the European Parliament and local council seats in Britain a "political earthquake" and "revolution" as strongly conservative candidates made significant gains. In Britain, the UK Independent Party (UKIP) outperformed the established Conservative, Labour and Liberal Democrat parties.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, Childs Walker and Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2010
Stick together in small groups. Avoid political demonstrations and large crowds of fellow Americans. Call your parents to let them know you're safe. The directors of study-abroad programs at Maryland universities spent Monday morning e-mailing hundreds of students about these basic precautions after Sunday's European terror alert from the U.S. State Department. "In this case, there is nothing specific, so it's really hard to go beyond the general recommendations we usually give," said Andre Colombat, Loyola's director of international programs.
NEWS
August 12, 2013
Netflix's multiple Emmy nominations are evidence that the Internet economy continues to thrive ("Baltimore-made 'House of Cards' makes history with major Emmy nominations," July 18). But surprisingly, critics of the industry are looking right past this evidence to demand that regulators tinker with the marketplace. Despite the trillion-plus dollars invested in America's broadband networks since President Bill Clinton signed the Telecommunication Act in 1996, pro-regulation advocates claim investment has dried up. Despite being one of only two countries with competing wired broadband technologies and nearly total coverage of blazing-fast LTE wireless networks, we are told that America's Internet market lacks competition.
NEWS
July 27, 1993
The Maastricht Treaty of 1991, tightening the unity of the European Community, is still alive. British House of Commons approval, after Prime Minister John Major made it a test of confidence in his government, means the treaty is as good as ratified in all 12 EC countries. A single currency for most of Europe may become a reality by the next century after all.The high drama of the treaty's rejection in the House of Commons last Thursday, followed by passage on Friday after Mr. Major threatened an immediate election if it lost, brought him from the pits to the peak of his career.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | July 21, 1997
PARIS -- The future of Europe was decided last week, even though the Europeans do not yet realize it. There are to be two ''Europes,'' not one.Last Tuesday the European Commission told the European Parliament that it recommended inviting five former Soviet-bloc countries to join the EU. These are the three already invited to join NATO -- the Czech Republic, Poland and Hungary -- plus Estonia and Slovenia.The next day, the commission took note of the radical structural changes necessary to make the European Union work, but postponed acting on them until the new millennium.
NEWS
January 2, 2013
As a practicing physician for more than 40 years, I read with interest Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s column on Obamacare ("Injecting Obamacare into economy will hurt - a lot," Dec. 30). He envisions the consequences will be higher taxes, bigger budgets and less choice. While all of that is probably correct, the key fact about Obamacare is that by 2019 the number of uninsured Americans will have been cut in half, from some 50 million to 25 million. But this is still a national disgrace, because it leaves the United States as the only industrialized country in the world that does not provide all of its citizens with a guaranteed level of basic health care.
NEWS
January 9, 1993
Several years ago, "Europe '92" was the hottest topic of economic futurists. What would happen when 12 markets became one, when an engineering design specification good in one country needed no change for the other 11, when a sausage meeting health standards in one met them in all, when people traveled from one to another without bothering to show papers?Would U.S. business be ready for the challenge and the opportunity? The phrase Europe '92, the year in which all the bureaucratic changes would be accomplished, really meant '93, the first day of which all changes would be in effect.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | May 28, 2014
For years Americans have assumed that our hard-charging capitalism is better than the soft-hearted version found in Canada and Europe. American capitalism might be a bit crueler, but it generates faster growth and higher living standards overall. Canada and Europe's "welfare-state socialism" is doomed. It was a questionable assumption to begin with, relying to some extent on our collective amnesia about the first three decades after World War II, when tax rates on top incomes in the U.S. never fell below 70 percent, a larger portion of our economy was invested in education than ever before or since, over a third of our private-sector workers were unionized, we came up with Medicare for the elderly and Medicaid for the poor, and built the biggest infrastructure project in history, known as the interstate highway system.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
On May 7, 1945, sixty-nine years ago, Col. Gen. Alfred Jodl affixed his name to the instrument of surrender and the war in Europe was over.  Price Day of The Baltimore Sun witnessed that quiet, somber ceremony, the only staff correspondent of an individual newspaper to be present at the German surrender. It was a little less than a year since British, American, and Canadian troops had stormed the beaches of Normandy, and Price Day was one of a handful of Sun correspondents who followed the troops from Normandy to German soil.  There is nothing novel about embedded reporters.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Leo Bretholz, a Holocaust survivor who became a major voice in the campaign to gain reparations from companies that transported victims to concentration camps during World War II, died Saturday in his sleep of unknown causes at his Pikesville home. He was 93. Mr. Bretholz was scheduled to testify Monday in the Maryland House of Delegates on a bill that would require the French railroad company SNCF, which is seeking a $6 billion contract from the state of Maryland to operate the Purple Line, to pay reparations to U.S. Holocaust survivors.
NEWS
February 24, 2014
The swiftly unfolding of events in Ukraine over the weekend saw chanting crowds depose the country's president, political prisoners freed from jail, the emergence of an interim government led by opposition figures and warrants for the arrest of former security officials who ordered police to fire on demonstrators in Kiev. The rapid developments apparently caught both U.S. and European Union officials by surprise, coming as they did only hours after those powers had signed a deal with Russia for a more gradual transition.
NEWS
By David Driver, For The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2014
Ryley Beaumont grew up in Millersville, participating in football, lacrosse and basketball. But when he was young he broke his hand playing football — just before the start of basketball season with a Severna Park youth program. "That ruined his basketball season," said his father, Russ, who played hoops at Southern High in Baltimore and has taught at Marley Middle School in Glen Burnie for nearly 30 years. As a boy, Beaumont was able to shoot baskets in Anne Arundel gyms since his father could usually get a key, thanks to his teaching job. "He did push-ups.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
A family crime organization trafficked more than $6.6 million in black market cigarettes and more in illegal foreign drugs through a Baltimore restaurant and a Pikesville pharmacy that received a Baltimore County-backed loan, authorities said in a federal indictment that was unsealed Wednesday. Authorities said the "Yusufov organization" laundered the proceeds of their operations through wire transfers to Eastern Europe. Some of those accused also established themselves as legitimate businesspeople in the community.
NEWS
September 17, 1992
While Germany calls the shots in Europe to the discomfort of others, the French relish their role in Sunday's referendum. They alone will decide if the supernational unification movement in Europe goes forward or backward. In the last poll, they were split down the middle.The Maastricht Treaty for monetary union was a natural progression for Eurocrats. The officials and politicians in the European Community are pushing the transformation of formerly warring powers into one economic superpower.
NEWS
November 21, 1990
One of the startling contrasts at the 34-nation assemblage of the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe is the self-assurance of NATO countries and the fretting that afflicts Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland and other nations which have broken free of Moscow's grip.Their time for celebration occurred a year ago. Now they face a future in which they are very much on their own -- burdened with economies wrecked by Communist theory, plagued by ethnic and nationalist unrest, tied to a Warsaw Pact that will shortly be dismantled, held at arms length by their prosperous western neighbors and very much at sea about their future security.
SPORTS
By Jonas Shaffer and The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
At varying times in his still-nascent basketball career, Aquille Carr has been a high school champion and a YouTube sensation, a college-bound prospect and an overseas professional, a point guard considered too small for the NBA yet good enough to play with a former league All-Star. For a player beset by contradictions and burdened with expectations, Carr's next move could be his most important yet, if only because of what it represents. The former Patterson star on Sunday signed a contract to enter the NBA Development League's draft next month, his agent said Tuesday night, all but ensuring that Carr will compete stateside for at least another season in a professional playing odyssey the 5-foot-5 guard believes will culminate in the NBA. “The kid's not afraid of competition,” Johnny Foster, Carr's Charlotte, N.C.-based agent, said in an interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
The man in the red turban is a mystery, and not only because his expression is grave, alert and slightly anxious. He is richly dressed, which clearly makes him a person of some importance. There weren't a lot of black people living in Europe in the 1600s, and even fewer displayed, as this man does, signs of princely favor. It's even more unusual that he was singled out for a painting of his own instead of being included as part of a larger group. Joaneath Spicer, the curator of Renaissance and Baroque art at the Walters Art Museum , thinks she might have uncovered subtle clues in the painting itself that might explain, if not the man's name, then his role, social status and even where he was born.
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