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By DAN RODRICKS | February 25, 1998
Last time we heard from Professor Solomon, he was touting his theory about lost objects: Almost everything you think you've lost is actually within 18 inches of where you think you lost it. That 18 inches is the Eureka Zone, according to Professor Solomon's theory. One should always carry a ruler, or have one nearby, so that one can always measure one's Eureka Zone.Let me tell you something: The man is a genuine Baltimore character, a gadfly, an eccentric, a gagster, a professor without portfolio.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2011
Earle Havens can almost hear their voices. Each time Havens steps inside the George Peabody Library, he senses the muted exclamations, the murmured back-and-forth of a conversation that's been going on now for more than two millennia. In one corner, there's a treatise from the third century B.C. in which Aristarchus of Samos estimated the distances between the sun, moon and earth. Across the room is an extremely rare unbound volume of Copernicus' "Revolution of the Celestial Spheres," in which the 15th-century astronomer advanced the then-heretical notion that the Earth was not the center of the universe.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 4, 2001
You know you're in trouble when a movie that lasts nearly four hours centers on four characters: two who won't talk, one who'd prefer not to talk and one who rarely has anything interesting to say. Writer-director Shinji Aoyama's "Eureka" is a ponderous, overwrought meditation on tragedy and the extreme means people use to deal with it. The film, shot in muted black and white, centers on a journey of redemption that ought to be epic and mystical, but...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | October 23, 2008
Hometown: Baltimore Members: Justin Levy, vocals and piano; Dami Soh, cello; Jason Hoffheins, drums; Allin Hinton, bass; and Dave Rogoza, guitar Founded: 2007 Style: experimental indie rock Influenced by: The Decemberists, Radiohead, Death Cab For Cutie Notable: The band's music combines complex instrumentation and dark lyrics, which make for a haunting, ambient sound. Next month, it will release its self-titled debut album, which it recorded with Margot and the Nuclear So and So's in Indiana.
NEWS
March 13, 2005
On March 5, 2005 HERBERT ARLIE HESS, 59. Son of the late Darl and Edythe Hess; Memorial Services will be held on March 19, at noon, at Eureka Fire Hall, 82 N. Main St., Stewartstown, PA 17363.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 27, 2008
Howard A. Wimbley, a retired postal letter carrier and former Essex resident, died Saturday of respiratory failure at a nursing home in Eureka, Mont. He was 86. Mr. Wimbley was born and raised in Baltimore. He was a 1935 graduate of St. Michael's parochial school. During World War II, he served in the Navy from 1942 to 1945, as a pay officer assigned to the Atlantic theater. Mr. Wimbley was a letter carrier in Essex from 1945 until his retirement in 1991. Mr. Wimbley, who moved to Eureka a decade ago, was an avid Orioles fan and HO-gauge model railroader.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | June 17, 1999
Peter Paul Rubens, Anthony van Dyck and others are featured in "An Eye for Detail," an exhibition of 67 small Dutch and Flemish paintings from a private collector that opens Sunday at the Walters Art Gallery.The show is designed to allow visitors to enjoy these "small marvels" in an intimate setting. The tiny still lifes, landscapes, portraits and genre scenes, some no larger than a postcard, are crafted with a precision that is at once engrossing and pleasing to the eye.Also opening Sunday at the Walters is "Eureka!
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | August 29, 1993
Eureka, Sutton Place Gourmet, 1809 Reisterstown Road, in the Festival at Woodholme. (410) 484-6044. Open for lunch and dinner. AE, MC, V. No smoking. Wheelchair accessible: yes. Prices: appetizers, $4.50-$5.95; entrees, $7.95-$13.95."Some people are upset that we've changed our menu," the woman who answered the phone told me when I called to make reservations at Eureka, the newest venture of Sutton Place Gourmet.I can see that. The cafe at the area's classiest supermarket used to be the place to have a gourmet sandwich or a salad -- a quick lunch or light supper (assuming you could get a table)
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2003
Despite its name, the Lemon Bonsai is no lemon. This adorable tree (pictured, $54.99), available through 1-800-FLOWERS.COM, sprouts new leaves, lightly scented blossoms and miniature lemons each year. It's just one of the cute gift ideas from the Web site, which offers the convenience of same-day or next-day delivery. There's also the Mini Bamboo Trio ($26.99), which comes in three mini ceramic planters. The plants are said to bestow good fortune, wealth and longevity on their owners. Or there's the Memory Garden Bouquet ($69.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | October 17, 1993
Bring on the bagels.That was the rallying cry last weekend when crowds lined the renovated Sam's Bagels in Roland Park.Come Saturday morning, we dropped by for our usual multigrain with walnut-raisin cream cheese. The place was so jampacked that we couldn't even nab a seat at the snazzy new cappuccino and espresso bar. All those chipper families, all those groggy students, all that cream cheese.We settled instead for a stool by the window facing an empty Coca-Cola refrigerator. It wasn't scenic, so we directed our gaze toward the new and larger bagel shop.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 27, 2008
Howard A. Wimbley, a retired postal letter carrier and former Essex resident, died Saturday of respiratory failure at a nursing home in Eureka, Mont. He was 86. Mr. Wimbley was born and raised in Baltimore. He was a 1935 graduate of St. Michael's parochial school. During World War II, he served in the Navy from 1942 to 1945, as a pay officer assigned to the Atlantic theater. Mr. Wimbley was a letter carrier in Essex from 1945 until his retirement in 1991. Mr. Wimbley, who moved to Eureka a decade ago, was an avid Orioles fan and HO-gauge model railroader.
NEWS
March 13, 2005
On March 5, 2005 HERBERT ARLIE HESS, 59. Son of the late Darl and Edythe Hess; Memorial Services will be held on March 19, at noon, at Eureka Fire Hall, 82 N. Main St., Stewartstown, PA 17363.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2003
Despite its name, the Lemon Bonsai is no lemon. This adorable tree (pictured, $54.99), available through 1-800-FLOWERS.COM, sprouts new leaves, lightly scented blossoms and miniature lemons each year. It's just one of the cute gift ideas from the Web site, which offers the convenience of same-day or next-day delivery. There's also the Mini Bamboo Trio ($26.99), which comes in three mini ceramic planters. The plants are said to bestow good fortune, wealth and longevity on their owners. Or there's the Memory Garden Bouquet ($69.
NEWS
May 9, 2003
WITH ALL due respect to love, ideas make the world go. Big and little ones, and particularly novel ones. It often takes no time at all to get them, or it can take an eternity. They can be worth vast sums or not even a plugged nickel - or sometimes they evolve into something of value much later. At their birth, ideas often are only in the eyes of their beholders. It can all depend on not what you see but how you see. Take Scott Barnhill, a fifth-grader at St. Paul's School in Brooklandville.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 4, 2001
You know you're in trouble when a movie that lasts nearly four hours centers on four characters: two who won't talk, one who'd prefer not to talk and one who rarely has anything interesting to say. Writer-director Shinji Aoyama's "Eureka" is a ponderous, overwrought meditation on tragedy and the extreme means people use to deal with it. The film, shot in muted black and white, centers on a journey of redemption that ought to be epic and mystical, but...
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2000
Using space-age tools to peer beneath the ink of a 12th-century prayer book, scientists in Maryland have discovered an even more ancient treasure - the only known copy in its original Greek of a work by the scientist Archimedes. The text, called "On Floating Bodies," is a medieval copy of the treatise first penned by Archimedes in the third century B.C. It had been erased and overwritten by monks in the 12th century, creating a twice-used parchment book known as a "palimpsest." Two teams of scientists, one from the Johns Hopkins University, have been working on the "Archimedes Palimpsest" since January, laboring to reveal the obliterated text with modern imaging technologies developed for medicine and space research.
NEWS
May 9, 2003
WITH ALL due respect to love, ideas make the world go. Big and little ones, and particularly novel ones. It often takes no time at all to get them, or it can take an eternity. They can be worth vast sums or not even a plugged nickel - or sometimes they evolve into something of value much later. At their birth, ideas often are only in the eyes of their beholders. It can all depend on not what you see but how you see. Take Scott Barnhill, a fifth-grader at St. Paul's School in Brooklandville.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 28, 1992
It's what science professor Richard Moyer calls the non-experiment: Take a tooth. Drop it in a glass of Coke. Wait three days. Tooth is gone, dissolved by the sugar."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | June 17, 1999
Peter Paul Rubens, Anthony van Dyck and others are featured in "An Eye for Detail," an exhibition of 67 small Dutch and Flemish paintings from a private collector that opens Sunday at the Walters Art Gallery.The show is designed to allow visitors to enjoy these "small marvels" in an intimate setting. The tiny still lifes, landscapes, portraits and genre scenes, some no larger than a postcard, are crafted with a precision that is at once engrossing and pleasing to the eye.Also opening Sunday at the Walters is "Eureka!
NEWS
February 26, 1998
FILE THIS one in the "last to know" category: Psychologists have discovered that the best predictor of a lasting marriage is a husband's willingness to defer to his wife's wishes.This news emerged from a study of 130 newlyweds over a six-year period. It shocked the researchers, who had assumed that techniques such as "active listening" ("So, honey, what I hear you saying is ") didn't make a couple any more likely to stay together than couples who didn't mirror each other's remarks.At least the researchers were honest enough to admit their surprise that such techniques didn't seem to make much difference in the outcome of a marriage.
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