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By David Wood and David Wood,Sun Reporter | July 6, 2007
Lance Cpl. Jeremy L. Tinnel, a Marine rifleman who survived a roadside bomb attack in Iraq's Anbar province in May, died Sunday in a boating accident on the Euphrates River, the Defense Department announced yesterday. Lance Corporal Tinnel was featured in a Sun article June 10 about American military casualties in Iraq from roadside bombs, or IEDs (improvised explosive devices). While the Pentagon listed his address as Mechanicsville, Va., his wife, Angel Tinnel, lives in Havre de Grace, according to the local Zellman Mitchell Smith Funeral Home.
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NEWS
October 27, 2007
How do you get a sense of $2.4 trillion? That's how much the Congressional Budget Office says the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan could cost over the next 10 years. It's an awful lot of money. But not, in principle, impossible to imagine. Consider some comparisons: Hurricane rainfall, gallons per day 2.4 trillion Passenger miles flown in 2006 2.4 trillion Gallons of water used in Florida every year 2.4 trillion Estimated barrels of oil in the world before drilling began 2.4 trillion Annual flow of Indus River, in cubic feet 2.4 trillion (That's three times as much, by the way, as that of the Tigris and Euphrates combined.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 4, 1991
God is on the side of the big bomber squadrons.Our soldiers made their sacrifice for the nation's honor. Now you make it for the economy: Spend, spend, spend.We could invade northern Iraq for the water supply and divert the Tigris and Euphrates to California.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun Reporter | July 6, 2007
Lance Cpl. Jeremy L. Tinnel, a Marine rifleman who survived a roadside bomb attack in Iraq's Anbar province in May, died Sunday in a boating accident on the Euphrates River, the Defense Department announced yesterday. Lance Corporal Tinnel was featured in a Sun article June 10 about American military casualties in Iraq from roadside bombs, or IEDs (improvised explosive devices). While the Pentagon listed his address as Mechanicsville, Va., his wife, Angel Tinnel, lives in Havre de Grace, according to the local Zellman Mitchell Smith Funeral Home.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 24, 2003
WITH THE 3RD INFANTRY DIVISION, in Central Iraq The Armys 3rd Infantry Division plunged deep into Iraq yesterday, skirmishing with Iraqi army and militia forces along the Euphrates River as they neared the outer ring of Baghdads defenses. Backed by unfettered airstrikes and long-range artillery, the divisions lead units crossed the long, jagged escarpment north of Najaf by midday and battered overwhelmed Iraqi troops who tried to slow the advance from rudimentary sand- bagged positions at the crest.
NEWS
By Hershel Shanks | October 20, 1999
THE POPE is going to Iraq -- and the United States doesn't like it. Neither does Britain. However, France has no objection, said Foreign Minister Hubert Vedrine after a recent 30-minute audience with Pope John Paul II.The pope wants to visit Ur later this year, where the patriarch Abraham was born. However, the pontiff may be going to the wrong Ur.In ancient times, there were a number of Urs, and the one John Paul intends to visit in southern Iraq, near the Persian Gulf, is one of the less likely candidates for Abraham's Ur.When the Lord called to Abraham to leave his native land, he and his father, Terah, set out for Canaan, but settled first in Haran.
NEWS
December 11, 1992
In his latest offense against Earth and humanity, Iraq' dictator Saddam Hussein is draining the marshes of the lower Tigris and Euphrates valleys so that tanks may deploy against the people who live there. The aim is to destroy the Marsh Arabs and their way of life, which may date from Babylonian times. The reason is that they are Shiites, and opposed to his rule.Saddam's offense is a marvel of engineering, a 270-foot wide canal from Baghdad to Basra running between and roughly parallel to the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers, to drain the marshes so that their residents can no long travel by canoe unseen, or live as they have lived, deprived even of water to drink.
NEWS
By Laurie Udesky and Laurie Udesky,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 7, 2000
BIRECIK, Turkey - In the last vestiges of twilight, a team of archaeologists was urgently working to rescues clues about an ancient past. The reason for the archaeologists' haste was the new Birecik dam and the lake that was filling behind it and about to flood a 2,000-year-old city. This week, the archaeologists won their race. They finished sketching the ruins, removing mosaics and statues, and reburying areas about to be flooded. The dam is part of the ambitious $32 billion Southeast Anatolia Project, known as GAP, and will bring electricity and water to farmers in an area that was one of the staging grounds for the long, fading war between Kurds and the Turkish army.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 2005
HUSAYBAH, Iraq -- Thousands of American and Iraqi troops laid siege yesterday to this town near the Syrian border in one of the largest military assaults since American-led forces stormed the guerrilla stronghold of Fallujah last year, Marine Corps officials said. The sweep, aimed at shutting down the flow of foreign fighters along the Euphrates River, began early yesterday as 2,500 American troops and 1,000 Iraqi soldiers, all led by the Marines, cordoned off roads around Husaybah before rolling into town in armored vehicles and marching in on foot.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,Los Angeles Times | April 15, 1991
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- Ending its gulf war occupation of Iraq, the United States began moving the last of its troops out of the Euphrates River Valley and into a buffer zone along the Iraq-Kuwait border yesterday, U.S. military officials announced.The estimated 40,000 U.S. combat troops who until now remained in Iraq started withdrawing around 4 p.m. local time, signaling the end of 45 days of occupation, the U.S. Central Command in Riyadh said.Thousands of Iraqi civilians who sought protection from U.S. troops will also be allowed to relocate in the buffer zone, which will be controlled by the United Nations, Central Command spokesmen said.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun Reporter | May 29, 2007
ANBAR PROVINCE, Iraq -- Once the most violence-racked region of Iraq, much of Anbar has become a relatively peaceful haven, ripe for the kind of economic development and political reform that has been the most noble and pressing U.S. goal for the nation it invaded four years ago. About 200 local Iraqi leaders in the dusty Euphrates River towns that stretch more than a hundred miles west of Baghdad have thrown in their lot with U.S.
NEWS
By Paul Richter and Paul Richter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The families of four security workers killed by a mob in Fallujah, Iraq, told lawmakers yesterday that the workers' employer, Blackwater USA, had failed to provide arms and armor the men needed to survive. Four female relatives said the men, whose bodies were burned and dragged through the streets in the 2004 attack, had been sent on a dangerous mission in vehicles without armor, maps, heavy machine guns or rear gunners. "When the decision was made to save millions of dollars by not buying armored vehicles, our husbands, fathers and sons were killed," said Kathryn Helvenston-Wettengel, mother of Scott Helvenston, tearfully reading a statement by the group.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Reporter | October 27, 2006
A team of Johns Hopkins University archaeologists digging in northern Syria this past summer found a 4,000-year-old tomb filled with human and animal remains, along with gold and silver artifacts. The tomb, one of at least eight at the site, is believed to be part of a royal cemetery in the ancient city of Tuba, one of Syria's first settlements and the capital of a small kingdom, according to Glenn Schwartz, a Hopkins professor of Near Eastern studies. The newly discovered tombs contain signs of ritual sacrifice, including the skeletons of infants and decapitated donkeys, as well as puppy bones, Schwartz said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 2005
HUSAYBAH, Iraq -- Thousands of American and Iraqi troops laid siege yesterday to this town near the Syrian border in one of the largest military assaults since American-led forces stormed the guerrilla stronghold of Fallujah last year, Marine Corps officials said. The sweep, aimed at shutting down the flow of foreign fighters along the Euphrates River, began early yesterday as 2,500 American troops and 1,000 Iraqi soldiers, all led by the Marines, cordoned off roads around Husaybah before rolling into town in armored vehicles and marching in on foot.
NEWS
By Solomon Moore and Solomon Moore,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 10, 2005
RIBAT, Iraq - The casualties mounted yesterday in remote desert villages near the Syrian border as U.S. troops launched their largest offensive since last year's invasion of Fallujah. Insurgents have killed at least three Marines and wounded 20 more trying to cross the Euphrates River in western Iraq. Marine commanders estimate they have killed more than 100 guerrillas since the offensive began Sunday. The Marines say that capturing or killing insurgents in these villages is key to pacifying Iraq.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and James Janega and Alex Rodriguez and James Janega,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 8, 2004
NEAR FALLUJAH, Iraq -- American troops began a drive into western sections of the rebel-held city of Fallujah last night, securing a hospital and major bridges in what appeared to be the initial phase of an all-out assault to retake the city and crush the insurgency that has controlled it since April. The push into Fallujah began hours after interim Prime Minister Ayad Allawi imposed a 60-day state of emergency in most of the country to confront a fresh wave of violence sweeping Iraq. Facing a decisive battle in Fallujah, where they are severely outgunned and outmanned, insurgents have engineered widespread attacks across central and western Iraq in the past two days, killing at least 50 people and wounding scores.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Reporter | October 27, 2006
A team of Johns Hopkins University archaeologists digging in northern Syria this past summer found a 4,000-year-old tomb filled with human and animal remains, along with gold and silver artifacts. The tomb, one of at least eight at the site, is believed to be part of a royal cemetery in the ancient city of Tuba, one of Syria's first settlements and the capital of a small kingdom, according to Glenn Schwartz, a Hopkins professor of Near Eastern studies. The newly discovered tombs contain signs of ritual sacrifice, including the skeletons of infants and decapitated donkeys, as well as puppy bones, Schwartz said.
NEWS
By Paul Richter and Paul Richter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The families of four security workers killed by a mob in Fallujah, Iraq, told lawmakers yesterday that the workers' employer, Blackwater USA, had failed to provide arms and armor the men needed to survive. Four female relatives said the men, whose bodies were burned and dragged through the streets in the 2004 attack, had been sent on a dangerous mission in vehicles without armor, maps, heavy machine guns or rear gunners. "When the decision was made to save millions of dollars by not buying armored vehicles, our husbands, fathers and sons were killed," said Kathryn Helvenston-Wettengel, mother of Scott Helvenston, tearfully reading a statement by the group.
NEWS
April 15, 2003
THE GOOD, THE BAD and the worrisome: In this war, it's hard to guess what will come next. Who would have dared to predict that seven American soldiers - thoroughly lost in the tumult of war three weeks ago - would suddenly emerge from Iraqi captivity, relatively unharmed? Who could have imagined that the collateral damage of this war would include a disastrous pillaging of the National Museum of Iraq, and the loss of tens of thousands of items from a collection that stretched back to the dawn of human civilization?
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 1, 2003
WASHINGTON -- American troops defeated Republican Guard soldiers in a fierce skirmish for control of a crucial Euphrates River bridge south of Baghdad yesterday in the closest land action yet to the Iraqi capital. Iraqi soldiers crouched behind hedges and brick walls, firing rocket-propelled grenades and small arms at an advancing column of U.S. tanks and Bradley fighting vehicles of the Army's 3rd Infantry Division in the town of Hindiya, about 50 miles south of Baghdad. At least 46 Iraqi soldiers were killed, most of them members of the Republican Guard, according to reports from the scene.
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