Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEuphoria
IN THE NEWS

Euphoria

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 18, 1991
The attack on Israel last night ended early hopes of a clean, neat victory over Saddam Hussein. But it should surprise no one that, by its very nature, war defies clean, neat outcomes. The air battle that analysts predicted would open the Persian Gulf war was largely successful, but obviously not a thorough victory. Following the pattern of earlier Mideast wars, air power is proving to be a decisive factor, but not decisive enough to win on its own. As one commentator has noted: War isn't just the surgery of precision bombing, it's also the brutal spectacle of armies slugging it out on land, often at a fearsome cost in human lives.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Richard J. Cross III | April 11, 2010
As expected, former governor Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. is running to reclaim his old job in Annapolis. This announcement has generated a wave of euphoria among Republicans optimistic about Mr. Ehrlich's chances. I remember the giddiness some Republicans felt about Ellen Sauerbrey's prospects after then-Governor Parris Glendening's approval ratings dipped below 50 percent in October 1998. I also remember how shocked we all were when the networks called the race for Mr. Glendening promptly at 8 p.m. on Election Day. While I believe that Republicans should feel enthusiasm about Mr. Ehrlich's campaign, this euphoria is dangerous.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Joseph Gallagher | March 29, 1991
For the U.S. and its allies the Gulf War became the euphoria war. ''Eu'' is the Greek word for ''good/well,'' and euphoria is the response to news which is ''well-borne,'' easy to take.Eugene and eugenics pertain to being well-born in another sense. Euclid means good fame, and Eunice good victory (nike). Eucharist is good charism or favor; a eulogy is a good word; euphemism is good speech which softens a hard word (e.g., ''passing'' for ''death''); euphony a good sound; euthanasia a good death.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 9, 2007
Bad ideas seem to skip generations when it comes to making holiday movies. Today's hectic farce-spectacle Fred Claus replicates the key mistake of the 1985 dud, Santa Claus: The Movie. With the potential of Santa's wonderworks at their disposal, all the filmmakers come up with for a plot is the peril of measuring toyshop productivity. In Fred Claus, the villain is Kevin Spacey's efficiency expert, who threatens to shut Santa's operation down if he can't meet children's increasing demands.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 30, 2001
The first use of the word "euphoric" I read after watching Baltimore video artist Lee Boot's mind-tickling "Making Euphoria" (screening tonight at the Creative Alliance) came in a book about a drug dealer who realized in 1973 he could fly dope out of Mexico and was "euphoric over the new possibilities." I mention this because Boot himself likes to use books as building blocks for his art projects (he once worked out his love-hate for the printed word by taping books together to make an easy chair)
NEWS
By Jack W.Germond & Jules Witcover | January 23, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Slowly but inevitably, the American people are coming to realize that, for all the spectacular tapes of U.S. bombing and missile attacks on Iraq shown nightly on television, what is going on in the Persian Gulf is no video game.The euphoria of the first days, during which American military officials boasted of an 80 percent success rate, has begun to fade to apprehension as other factors begin to drive home that this conflict, like all wars, means pain, death and uncertainty about its duration.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 25, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Bush administration officials struggled yesterday, with little apparent success, to dampen expectations of a quick, crushing victory in the Persian Gulf war.Glowing reports from the battlefront fed predictions of a rapid end to the land campaign. Analysts both inside and outside the government said that the hard fighting would be over in three or four days.It seemed clear that President Bush and other coalition leaders were aiming to humiliate Iraq militarily, in hopes of forcing Iraqi President Saddam Hussein from power.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff | June 12, 2005
It takes a nanosecond to realize that Euphoria is not your typical educational film that battles substance abuse with an avalanche of really scary facts. Even before filmmaker and narrator Lee Boot sheds the "Stone Phillips" wig and all clothing save boxer shorts (the better to tell the truth in), the film veers from dry documentary to a quizzical exploration of the brain and its biologically propelled pursuit of happiness. The digital film, screened three times before receptive crowds at the Maryland Film Festival in May, and at the WorldFest-Houston festival in April, owes as much to Federico Fellini as it does to Bill Nye the Science Guy. A montage of visual metaphors, profiles and scientific fact, feature-length Euphoria is not a documentary in the truest sense, and its narrative arc is as loose and loopy as can be. Nor does Euphoria attempt to terrify viewers in the tradition of the 1936 cult film Reefer Madness and other memorable media scare tactics.
NEWS
August 18, 1997
AFTER A BIG bash often comes a hangover. This is the case in South Africa, where the euphoria that followed the end of apartheid and Nelson Mandela's bloodless rise to power three years ago is now starting to ebb.The erosion so far is slight. Blacks, who gave him an 8.7 rating on a scale of 10 a year ago, now accord him 8.3, according to a nationwide survey. The president's support among other ethnic groups has also softened.The big story, though, is respondents' growing ambivalence about all established political leaders in South Africa.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | August 3, 1992
NOTEworthy Day: All signs point to the Orioles being in the divisional hunt all the way and record crowds taking the final home attendance to more than 3.5 million. When will the euphoria surrounding the new park subside? Chuck McGeehan, correspondent for Sports Ticker, says, "five minutes after next year's All-Star Game is over." He's probably right.* Another important responsibility has been placed in the capable hands of Gene Corrigan, the Atlantic Coast Conference commissioner, via his appointment as chairman of the honors court that makes selections to the College Football Hall of Fame . . . At last count, 12 corporate entertainment tents, with catering by Leonard Schleider and his Cameo organization, will be erected on the Memorial Stadium parking lot for the exhibition between the Miami Dolphins and the New Orleans Saints . . . Incidentally, publisher Ted Venetoulis of the Oriole Gazette will be out with a football version, the Colt Gazette, for the game Aug. 27, edited by Robbie Wallace, former "quarterback" of the Belair Aegis.
TRAVEL
By Harry Shattuck and Harry Shattuck,Houston Chronicle | September 30, 2007
AS A 10-TIME WINNER OF CONDE NAST Traveler magazine's best destination spa award, Canyon Ranch health resorts in Massachusetts and Arizona are renowned for pampering guests. Meanwhile, Cunard Line's Queen Mary 2 is one of the most elegant ocean liners afloat. CANCUN & THE YUCATAN: DAY BY DAY Frommer's / Wiley / $12.99 People continue to flock to these regions of Mexico for many reasons, but perhaps a lot of it has to do with the white sandy beaches and pre- Columbian ruins. If your time is limited, authors Irene and Bill Sunley offer the best of the Yucatan in three days, as well as one-week and two-week durations.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | September 24, 2007
The political hangover from this month's Democratic primary is beginning to lift at City Hall - and elected officials are getting back to business - but for a handful candidates, the campaign season is still in full swing. Seven Republicans and two Green Party candidates are running in the Nov. 6 general election. Mounting campaigns in a city that is overwhelmingly Democratic, their first battle is trying to convince Baltimore voters that there are legitimate political parties in town whose names don't begin with the letter D. "I don't think the people of Baltimore are concerned about Republican or Democrat or black or white.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,Sun Columnist | October 22, 2006
The Dow Jones industrial average ventured into new territory last week when it closed above 12,000, a reminder of those heady days nearly seven years ago. Back then, market euphoria turned investing principles upside down. Diversification was declared dead. Technology was the only game worth playing. Earnings, or even revenue, didn't matter. Neither did dividends. Stock appreciation was everything. Our tolerance for risk was off the charts. And who needed professional advice when stocks only went up?
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun reporter | October 15, 2006
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. -- Not even a concrete wall could quell the bedlam resonating from the visiting team's locker room yesterday at Scott Stadium. Although his words were muffled, the emotion in coach Ralph Friedgen's voice was clear, and his post-game victory speech was soon replaced by booming baritones singing the Maryland "Victory Song." The players and coaches barked out "M-A-R-Y-L-A-N-D" in unison, the finale to a celebration of their 28-26 come-from-behind win at Virginia - the program's first victory here since 1990.
FEATURES
January 30, 2006
Pursuit of happiness focus of `Euphoria' Today at 1:30, catch a screening of the documentary Euphoria at Maryland Institute College of Art's Falvey Hall, 1301 Mount Royal Ave. The film, which ex amines the pursuit of happiness and had its premiere at the most recent Maryland Film Fes tival, is by MICA alumnus Lee Boot. Admission is free. For more information, see www.mi ca.edu or call 410-225-2300. FYI Kevin Cowherd is on as signment. His column will return Thursday.
NEWS
By LINELL SMITH and LINELL SMITH,SUN REPORTER | January 22, 2006
What is happiness in America? Is it a matter of culture, or chemistry? How do we create it - and make it last? To consider such questions, Baltimore filmmaker and educator Lee Boot has created Euphoria, an ingenious documentary with "chapters" illustrated by fantastical visual metaphors. Imagine bargain hunters transplanted to the beach at Assateague Island, flexing, stretching, then racing their shopping carts toward the ocean, scooping up random objects in a frenzy of consumerism. Or think of children playing in an abandoned industrial park: As they try to shove inflated beach balls into briefcases that won't close, they embody the American quest to combine work with play.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Evening Sun Staff | March 13, 1991
A newspaper columnist describes it as "Miller Time U.S.A."A local clergyman calls it "sad and tragic."Both are referring to the apparent euphoria sweeping the United States after the military victory over Iraq. America seems to be in a partying mood as the Desert Storm troops are welcomed home with airport ceremonies and Main Street parades."We won the Super Bowl, and so what do you do after you win the Super Bowl? You celebrate," the Rev. John Lombardi says with a trace of sarcasm. He is an associate pastor at St. Mary of the Assumption Roman Catholic Church in Govans.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,Sun Columnist | October 22, 2006
The Dow Jones industrial average ventured into new territory last week when it closed above 12,000, a reminder of those heady days nearly seven years ago. Back then, market euphoria turned investing principles upside down. Diversification was declared dead. Technology was the only game worth playing. Earnings, or even revenue, didn't matter. Neither did dividends. Stock appreciation was everything. Our tolerance for risk was off the charts. And who needed professional advice when stocks only went up?
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff | June 12, 2005
It takes a nanosecond to realize that Euphoria is not your typical educational film that battles substance abuse with an avalanche of really scary facts. Even before filmmaker and narrator Lee Boot sheds the "Stone Phillips" wig and all clothing save boxer shorts (the better to tell the truth in), the film veers from dry documentary to a quizzical exploration of the brain and its biologically propelled pursuit of happiness. The digital film, screened three times before receptive crowds at the Maryland Film Festival in May, and at the WorldFest-Houston festival in April, owes as much to Federico Fellini as it does to Bill Nye the Science Guy. A montage of visual metaphors, profiles and scientific fact, feature-length Euphoria is not a documentary in the truest sense, and its narrative arc is as loose and loopy as can be. Nor does Euphoria attempt to terrify viewers in the tradition of the 1936 cult film Reefer Madness and other memorable media scare tactics.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 31, 2001
In our dumbed-down era of discourse, "lowering expectations" has become a politician's favorite ploy. But Shakespeare's Othello shows that a gifted man can use that ploy as a prelude to brilliance. Before defending his and Desdemona's secret marriage, the Moor apologizes to his senator father-in-law and the Duke of Venice for his crudeness. "Rude am I in speech," he says, before launching into a transporting narrative about her fascination with him as a warrior: "She loved me for the dangers I had passed / and I loved her that she did pity them."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.