Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEuphemism
IN THE NEWS

Euphemism

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | April 2, 2000
"The Vanishing American Outhouse" by Ronald S. Barlow (Viking, 144 pages, $19.95) This is one of those pastiche volumes that, if you have enough space, is grand to have around for the sake of a long, miserably wet, cold weekend afternoon. If the idea is repugnant, forget it; but bear in mind that the era of outdoor plumbing (to use but one fond euphemism) was one of an excess of politesse. So, there is little to shock here, except perhaps the vastness of the proliferation of joke postcards about outhouses.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
"Is there any way out other than the main stairs?" I asked. My husband, our real-estate agent, the seller's agent and I were standing in the finished basement of a home in Owings Mills. It was a vast space: a nice bathroom, a media room, a room big enough to waltz in and another room with hidden panels in the walls for stashing who knows what. There was even a fireplace at the bottom of the stairs, creating a spa-like atmosphere. But no, the selling agent said that there was just the one staircase, noting that some people like having only one way into the basement because exterior doors attract thieves.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | March 24, 2011
A week and a half before the United States launched a war -- or whatever euphemism the administration is currently using while dropping bombs -- against Libya, General David Petraeus and Secretary of Defense Robert Gates joked around about invading the country. The administration is adamant in saying the bombing isn't a war, while the military is joking around about invasions. I guess not everyone is getting the talking points memos.   
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
My son Aaron started day care on Monday, the same day I returned to the office. I wanted to start him a week earlier to transition him in a little more subtly, but it appears I was in denial about going back to work, and there weren't any free spaces until this week. I was a little concerned about how that first day would go. He's only 4 months old, and he hasn't spent much time away from me at all. So I was pleased to see on his daily report a check mark next to "Cheerful" in the disposition section.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | May 23, 1991
Washington. -- "Within-group score conversion'' is a euphemism for ''race-norming,'' which is a euphemism for a form of ''affirmative action,'' which is today's euphemism for reverse discrimination, adopted when ''compensatory opportunity'' proved to be a jawbreaker.But perhaps before you have mastered the obfuscating language of compassion's guilty conscience, race-norming may be dead. It may be killed by the democratic device of asking those who favor it -- mostly Democrats -- to actually vote for it.Rep.
NEWS
By Joe Velisek | April 24, 2009
Enhanced interrogation techniques" is the euphemism used by the Bush administration for the treatment of "enemy combatants" (another euphemism) - which included sleep deprivation, solitary confinement and, of course, water-boarding. I don't think it takes a big leap of the imagination to label EITs for what they are: torture. Time will tell if these "techniques" were justified, necessary or successful, but for now let's put an end to the name game. After review by the Justice Department, President Barack Obama has begun to release "secret" memos concerning the legal rationalization for the use of torture - mainly by the CIA - in gaining information.
NEWS
September 15, 2006
The president of Chechnya - the rebellious redoubt in the Caucasus Mountains that was famous for kidnappings and beheadings and organized crime until the Russian army essentially blew it to smithereens, so that it is now principally famous for jihad and ambushes and wreckage and corruption - believes it has an image problem. He says Chechnya is a Russian word that by now is loaded with negative associations. He suggests that the whole world would feel better about the place if the people there adapted a local term and began calling it the Republic of Nokhchiin instead.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 7, 1991
A GOVERNMENT that Israelis agree is the most right wing in their nation's history has just become more so.Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir has brought into his cabinet Rehavam Zeevi, leader of the tiny Homeland (Moledet) Party, which has two seats in the 120-member Knesset. The party's platform calls for expelling the entire population of Palestinian Arabs -- "transferring" is the preferred euphemism -- from the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip to Jordan or other countries.That idea, until recently embraced by only a small band of extremists, has risen in popular favor in the three years that the intifada in the occupied territories has gone on, and under the stress of Iraqi missile attacks on Israeli cities.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 31, 2010
In June of 1963, after a tumultuous spring of demonstrations in Birmingham, Ala., John F. Kennedy said an odd thing. In a meeting at the White House, the president told civil rights leaders they ought not be too hard on Bull Connor. Connor, he said with a grin, "Has done as much for civil rights as Abraham Lincoln. " Theophilus Eugene Connor, of course, was commissioner of public safety in Birmingham. When you see archival footage of children being menaced by police dogs or bowled over by water from fire hoses, you are seeing his handiwork.
NEWS
By JOHN R. LION | May 22, 1991
I've a patient who brings a dog to therapy. The little critter is adorable, and he sits there attentively and listens to every interpretation I make. Do I bill Blue Cross for conjoint or individual psychotherapy?Several folks I see complain of lovelessness. It is very acute and causes immense despair, but the entity is not in our catalog of illnesses. How do I denote the condition on the invoice?Thumbing through our bible, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, I see the range of man's desperations: anxiety disorders, depression, sexual dysfunction, the schizophrenias, a whole list of dismays.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | March 24, 2011
A week and a half before the United States launched a war -- or whatever euphemism the administration is currently using while dropping bombs -- against Libya, General David Petraeus and Secretary of Defense Robert Gates joked around about invading the country. The administration is adamant in saying the bombing isn't a war, while the military is joking around about invasions. I guess not everyone is getting the talking points memos.   
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 31, 2010
In June of 1963, after a tumultuous spring of demonstrations in Birmingham, Ala., John F. Kennedy said an odd thing. In a meeting at the White House, the president told civil rights leaders they ought not be too hard on Bull Connor. Connor, he said with a grin, "Has done as much for civil rights as Abraham Lincoln. " Theophilus Eugene Connor, of course, was commissioner of public safety in Birmingham. When you see archival footage of children being menaced by police dogs or bowled over by water from fire hoses, you are seeing his handiwork.
NEWS
By Joe Velisek | April 24, 2009
Enhanced interrogation techniques" is the euphemism used by the Bush administration for the treatment of "enemy combatants" (another euphemism) - which included sleep deprivation, solitary confinement and, of course, water-boarding. I don't think it takes a big leap of the imagination to label EITs for what they are: torture. Time will tell if these "techniques" were justified, necessary or successful, but for now let's put an end to the name game. After review by the Justice Department, President Barack Obama has begun to release "secret" memos concerning the legal rationalization for the use of torture - mainly by the CIA - in gaining information.
FEATURES
By Martin Miller and Martin Miller,Los AngelesTimes | July 5, 2007
"Pulled Indefinitely." "Off the Schedule." "Permanent Hiatus." These could easily be titles for a new slate of fall sitcoms and dramas. Instead they are the most common euphemisms employed by networks when they talk about the dying elephant in the screening room - the uncomfortable truth that somebody's favorite television show is being canceled. It's a sad fact of life and prime-time television, where a show can last a few episodes (like last season's crime drama Smith) or 11 seasons (like the comedy Cheers)
NEWS
April 29, 2007
Let's start by using Kevin Tillman's word: "fiction." The original story of the death in Afghanistan of his brother Pat, the one-time pro football player turned Army Ranger, bore so little resemblance to the truth that Kevin could find no other word to describe it during his passionate congressional testimony last week. The Army had taken a horrible, stupid death - at the hands of a fellow American soldier who kept shooting when he shouldn't have - and recast it as an inspiring fable of bravery, duty and sacrifice.
NEWS
September 15, 2006
The president of Chechnya - the rebellious redoubt in the Caucasus Mountains that was famous for kidnappings and beheadings and organized crime until the Russian army essentially blew it to smithereens, so that it is now principally famous for jihad and ambushes and wreckage and corruption - believes it has an image problem. He says Chechnya is a Russian word that by now is loaded with negative associations. He suggests that the whole world would feel better about the place if the people there adapted a local term and began calling it the Republic of Nokhchiin instead.
NEWS
By Susanne Trowbridge | February 26, 1993
THE young woman behind the counter at the auto-repair shop was insistent. "I need two telephone numbers," she said.I pointed to the number printed on the check. "That's a day and an evening number," I explained. "I don't have a second number."She nodded knowingly, picked up a red pen and printed the word "HOUSEWIFE" on the face of the check.Housewife! I spent the rest of the day moping about the fact that the dreaded H-word had been applied to me.When I was a teen-ager, I could never quite decide what I wanted to be when I grew up, but I knew what I didn't want to be -- a housewife.
NEWS
By DICK WILLIAMS | July 6, 1993
Atlanta. -- In the blizzard of words and numbers from Washington, some facts jump off the page. They are so indefensible, they aren't mentioned. So it is with the question of federal funds for abortions, part of the House debate over the huge social appropriations bill.The unsuccessful attempt last week to repeal the Hyde Amendment of 1976 was a test vote on the current strength of the anti-abortion movement -- an important test because it will set the stage for the larger debate over Hillary Rodham Clinton's health-care package.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | April 2, 2000
"The Vanishing American Outhouse" by Ronald S. Barlow (Viking, 144 pages, $19.95) This is one of those pastiche volumes that, if you have enough space, is grand to have around for the sake of a long, miserably wet, cold weekend afternoon. If the idea is repugnant, forget it; but bear in mind that the era of outdoor plumbing (to use but one fond euphemism) was one of an excess of politesse. So, there is little to shock here, except perhaps the vastness of the proliferation of joke postcards about outhouses.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1996
More than 20 years ago, Paul Fussell dedicated the book that made him an important literary figure in America to Sgt. Edward Keith Hudson, "Killed beside me in France." It happened March 15, 1945.The dedication was a poetic gesture to the man whose life was snuffed out by the same artillery blast that put Lieutenant Fussell into the hospital in World War II. The book, which won the National Book Award and carries the dedication to Hudson, was about the First World War, 1914-1918. Titled "The Great War and Modern Memory," it explored the poetry, memoirs and other outpourings of some of Britain's great writers who had first-hand experience in the trenches.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.