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Eunice Kennedy Shriver

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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 31, 2000
Eunice Kennedy Shriver, sister of President John F. Kennedy and the aunt of Maryland Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, remained in critical but stable condition last night at Johns Hopkins Hospital after surgery this month to remove a benign tumor from her pancreas. The 79-year-old Potomac resident was readmitted to Hopkins on Oct. 23 after complaining of pain. The next day, doctors operated to address what family members described as a postoperative infection. Shriver is best known for founding the Special Olympics in 1963.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
Dr. Robert E. Cooke, a retired Johns Hopkins pediatrician-in-chief who was a founder of the Head Start children's program and a presidential medical adviser, died of heart disease Feb. 2 at his Oak Bluffs home on Martha's Vineyard, Mass. The former North Roland Park resident was 93. "We have lost a true visionary, whose acumen, passion and dedication have influenced generations of pediatricians and changed the lives of millions of children," said Dr. Paul B. Rothman, dean of the medical faculty and chief executive officer of Johns Hopkins Medicine.
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NEWS
January 20, 1991
Eunice Kennedy Shriver, injured last week in a head-on crash in Washington, has been transferred to Johns Hopkins Hospital and is undergoing treatment for two broken arms.Mrs. Shriver, sister of the late President John F. Kennedy and wife of former vice presidential candidate R. Sargent Shriver, a part-owner of the Baltimore Orioles, was in stable condition and resting comfortably, said Debbie Bangledorf, a hospital spokeswoman.Mrs. Shriver was being treated for a several broken bones, including a shattered elbow, Ms. Bangledorf said.
NEWS
By The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2011
"Sargent Shriver embodied the ideals we share as One Maryland — our belief in the dignity of every individual and in our own responsibility to advance the greater good. ... Sargent Shriver's overwhelming optimism and energy brightened our nation in its darkest times and served to defend the very ideals our country was built upon. " Gov. Martin O'Malley … "Sargent was a passionate advocate for peace, justice and fairness throughout our society and across our world.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1999
This was to have been a week of political and family celebration for Maryland Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend. It began with a Baltimore fund-raiser and was to conclude yesterday with the wedding on Cape Cod of her youngest sister, Rory.Instead, the wedding was postponed, and Townsend and her family spent the day awaiting word on the fate of her cousin, John F. Kennedy Jr., his wife and sister-in-law.Townsend and her husband, David, were among those gathered at the Kennedy compound in Hyannis Port, Mass.
NEWS
January 24, 1995
With his financial successes, his ambition and drive, Joseph P. Kennedy made possible his family's rise as the country's most successful political dynasty of the modern era. But it was his wife, Rose, who instilled in her nine children the ideals of public service and the sense of civic duty that inspired them to pursue it.Anyone whose life spans more than a century will witness momentous changes. In her 104 years, Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, who died Sunday, not only watched those changes, she and her family often played leading roles.
FEATURES
By Kenneth R. Clark and Kenneth R. Clark,Chicago Tribune | August 14, 1991
When the first Special Olympics for the mentally retarded was held at Chicago's Soldier Field in 1968, the games were attended by only a few of founder Eunice Kennedy Shriver's friends and 12 other spectators. There were no celebrities, no TV cameras and only a few athletes from three nations.Now swollen to 6,000 contestants from 104 nations, the event will be celebrated this week in an ABC prime-time special, "The International Special Olympics All-Star Gala" (8 p.m. Thursday on Channel 13)
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 12, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Hoping to capitalize on the success of a storied political family to wrest a House seat from a popular Republican, some Democrats are urging Maryland Del. Mark K. Shriver to challenge Rep. Constance A. Morella of Montgomery County next year.Shriver's chief champion is his first cousin -- Rhode Island Rep. Patrick J. Kennedy, the son of Massachusetts U.S. Sen. Edward M. Kennedy -- who is leading the Democratic effort to retake control of the House.But Shriver, the scion of two prominent political families with significant ambitions of his own, has expressed some reluctance to take on Morella, a moderate Republican popular among her largely Democratic constituency.
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | October 27, 1999
Over the past three months, The Sun's editorial page has published its Marylanders of the Century series -- profiles of 21 people who made key contributions to the community and society. We also asked readers to contribute their own Marylanders of note. Here is a selection of the responses we received:AS THE only married Maryland couple whose accomplishments led to each being awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, R. Sargent Shriver Jr. and Eunice Kennedy Shriver have rendered extraordinary service to those whom society long overlooked -- the poor and the mentally retarded.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2002
ROCKVILLE - Maryland's 8th Congressional District is expected to provide one of the most hotly contested and expensive primaries in the country, but last night the four Democratic candidates relied largely on soft-spoken innuendo rather than direct attacks in their biggest debate so far. There was one exception, in a late exchange by two of the hopefuls. Former Clinton administration trade negotiator Ira Shapiro asked why state Del. Mark K. Shriver campaigned recently with, among others, former NAACP director Benjamin F. Muhammad.
NEWS
By a Baltimore Sun reporter | August 12, 2009
Eunice Kennedy Shriver, a champion of the mentally retarded, the wife of a one-time vice presidential candidate and the sister of a president, died early Tuesday surrounded by relatives at a Hyannis, Mass., hospital. She was 88. Shriver had suffered a series of strokes in recent years and died at Cape Cod Hospital, her family said in a statement. Her husband, her five children and all 19 of her grandchildren were by her side, the statement said. A Potomac resident for more than 40 years, Mrs. Shriver was an activist in the field of mental retardation and founded the Special Olympics for mentally disabled athletes.
FEATURES
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2004
Her white-blond hair swept into a black swim turban, Eunice Kennedy Shriver, 83, cut a rail-thin but commanding figure in the middle of her backyard pool. "Now watch Mrs. Shriver's arms," she said to the group of young people around her, before launching into a smooth, sure crawl stroke. "I was a very good swimmer when I was your age." Thirty-six years after she last ran a summer camp for the mentally disabled, which eventually turned into the Special Olympics, Shriver was at it again - trying to show the world that these are people who can participate perfectly well in sports if only someone is willing to show them how. For two weeks, about 60 disabled campers - along with volunteer counselors who include some of Shriver's famous children and grandchildren - have roamed her Potomac estate, learning sports from basketball to bocce.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 8, 2003
LOS ANGELES -- In a stunning finale to a tumultuous campaign, angry California voters fired Gov. Gray Davis less than a year into his term and lifted movie star Arnold Schwarzenegger into the governor's chair in yesterday's recall election. Schwarzenegger overcame a stream of last-minute newspaper reports about alleged improper sexual conduct to gain elective office on the first try. Among the keys to his victory were backing from independent voters and stronger-than-expected support from women, exit polling showed.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2002
ROCKVILLE - Maryland's 8th Congressional District is expected to provide one of the most hotly contested and expensive primaries in the country, but last night the four Democratic candidates relied largely on soft-spoken innuendo rather than direct attacks in their biggest debate so far. There was one exception, in a late exchange by two of the hopefuls. Former Clinton administration trade negotiator Ira Shapiro asked why state Del. Mark K. Shriver campaigned recently with, among others, former NAACP director Benjamin F. Muhammad.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2002
As Del. Mark K. Shriver goes door to door in his race for Congress, he sometimes is asked who he's running against. His response: Connie Morella. The answer shows confidence but may be premature. Shriver has to win the Sept. 10 Democratic primary before he can run against Rep. Constance A. Morella, the popular Republican who holds Maryland's 8th District congressional seat. Political observers say the race is by no means a lock for Shriver, a lavishly financed member of the extended Kennedy family.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Michael Dresser and Jeff Barker and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2001
THE PARKING lots were filled to capacity, traffic was backed up nearly to the Capital Beltway, and thousands of participants and musicians were drenched in a downpour. It sounds like Woodstock, but it was a Saturday afternoon fund-raiser for the unannounced 2002 gubernatorial campaign of Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend -- an event that showed why she is such an intimidating candidate for would-be challengers. The fund-raiser -- billed as an early birthday celebration (she turns 50 on July 4)
NEWS
By The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2011
"Sargent Shriver embodied the ideals we share as One Maryland — our belief in the dignity of every individual and in our own responsibility to advance the greater good. ... Sargent Shriver's overwhelming optimism and energy brightened our nation in its darkest times and served to defend the very ideals our country was built upon. " Gov. Martin O'Malley … "Sargent was a passionate advocate for peace, justice and fairness throughout our society and across our world.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Darren M. Allen and Frank Langfitt and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writers | May 22, 1994
William James Cunningham walked onto the Baltimore Arena's stage yesterday before several thousand people, accepted his diploma and then leapt into his father's arms.After six years and two majors at Loyola College, Mr. Cunningham had finally graduated with the help of his father, Francis, a philosophy professor and assistant provost at the school."It's been a long time coming," said the senior, who hopes to teach math or work in the Peace Corps.Mr. Cunningham joined more than 2,400 men and women around Maryland yesterday in celebrating years of work on their final day as college undergraduate or graduate students.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | May 6, 2001
CONNIE Morella's brand of liberal Republicanism has been out of vogue for years. But she's a fabulous people person, the kind who makes you feel good about elected officials. That's a prime reason she's won eight terms in Congress. It helps that she lives in the state's most liberal county. Montgomery -- though a Democratic stronghold -- has a tradition of sending GOP moderates like Connie Morella to Congress. But times are changing. Ms. Morella won by only 17,000 votes last year, her slimmest margin, against a weak foe. Even worse, Democrats in power are gunning for her seat.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 31, 2000
Eunice Kennedy Shriver, sister of President John F. Kennedy and the aunt of Maryland Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, remained in critical but stable condition last night at Johns Hopkins Hospital after surgery this month to remove a benign tumor from her pancreas. The 79-year-old Potomac resident was readmitted to Hopkins on Oct. 23 after complaining of pain. The next day, doctors operated to address what family members described as a postoperative infection. Shriver is best known for founding the Special Olympics in 1963.
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