Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEugene O Neill
IN THE NEWS

Eugene O Neill

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 4, 1991
/TC Waterford, Conn. -- Critics might seem like the last people a budding playwright would want to have around.But at the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center, the critics aren't scouting out hits or flops.Known as "critic fellows," they're participants in one of the O'Neill's more unusual programs -- the National Critics Institute. An intensive series of workshops and seminars for working professionals, the Institute is held each July, concurrent with the National Playwrights Conference, one of the pre-eminent new-play programs in the country.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2013
Center Stage could easily have chosen a work of great dramatic depth and weight to open its 51st season - some masterwork of the vast American theatrical canon, like, say, Eugene O'Neill's "Strange Interlude" from 1928. But, noooooooo. Instead, the company managed to drag up another piece from the very same year, one that dares mock that O'Neill drama, not to mention all that is sacred about society, art, business, honor and romance. To which theater-goers all over Baltimore should respond with one word: Hooray.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 9, 1997
Gino Santi,81, who led the design and development of the first U.S. ejection seat for military aircraft, died of cancer Thursday in Dayton, Ohio.Mr. Santi served in the Army Air Forces during World War II and later became project engineer on the team that developed the ejection seat in 1949. He also is credited with inventing a prototype for air bags used in automobiles and an automatic-opening lap belt used in military aircraft.Travis Bogard,79, one of the foremost experts on the life and works of playwright Eugene O'Neill, died Saturday in Berkeley, Calif.
NEWS
By Capsules by Michael Sragow unless noted | November 14, 2008
Capsules by Michael Sragow unless noted. Full reviews are at baltimoresun.com/movies. Body of Lies: *** ( 3 STARS) This spy vs. spy thriller is smart, tense and rippling with topicality. Leonardo DiCaprio's deceptively rugged CIA agent masterminds the capture of a new world-class terrorist (Alon Abutbul) despite the bungling and interference of his Langley, Va.-based boss (Russell Crowe). The actor creates an existential juggler throwing a fistful of knives in midair - and DiCaprio doesn't drop a single blade.
NEWS
August 25, 1996
Eugene O'Neill (1888-1953) was born in New York to an actor father and drug-addicted mother. His brother was an alcoholic, and the illnesses and depression that dogged O'Neill through his life set in during his youth.He went to Princeton University but left after a year. He spent the next several years as a seaman in Buenos Aires, prospecting for gold in Honduras and working as an actor and journalist.In 1912, after attempting suicide and entering a tuberculosis sanitarium, he decided to be a playwright.
NEWS
By Arthur Laupus and Arthur Laupus,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 25, 2001
Ever wish that you could gather all your conflicts, repressed sexual longings, neurotic tendencies, ambivalent feelings and obsessive-compulsive habits, write about them in the form of a successful play or movie, become a celebrity, win literary prizes and make a heck of a lot of money? Perhaps the best example of a playwright who examined his life and familial relationships with the psycho-therapeutic pen is Eugene O'Neill. Born of a morphine-addicted mother and embittered alcoholic father, O'Neill turned to his older brother Jamie for support and advice.
FEATURES
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | April 17, 2006
As it gears up for its 43rd year, Center Stage is planning a challenging slate of shows for its 2006-2007 season - and an even more ambitious fundraising campaign. The offerings for next year include a masterpiece of Russian theater, a bittersweet comedy by American literary giant Eugene O'Neill, a psychological thriller, a musical version of Shakespeare's The Comedy of Errors and a play that explores the obstacles faced by black performers in the mid-20th century. And just as the Center Stage staff is finessing what audiences see inside its two theaters, administrators also are fine-tuning how they will see it. A $6.8 million fundraising campaign, now beginning its public phase, will be used partly to renovate the Center Stage lobby and to upgrade scenery, lighting and sound systems.
FEATURES
By Jenny Komatsu and Jenny Komatsu,Contributing Writer | September 17, 1995
The National Playwrights Conference and New Drama for Media Project of the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center are accepting scripts to be considered for the July 1996 conference.The conference is devoted to discovering gifted writers and helping them to develop their talents. Submit original, full-length works for stage, screen or television that have never been produced and are not under option.Writers must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents of the United States. The deadline is Dec. 1. For an application, send a self-addressed stamped No. 10 envelope to National Playwrights Conference, Eugene O'Neill Theater Center, 234 W. 44th St., Suite 901, New York, N.Y. 10036.
NEWS
By Capsules by Michael Sragow unless noted | November 14, 2008
Capsules by Michael Sragow unless noted. Full reviews are at baltimoresun.com/movies. Body of Lies: *** ( 3 STARS) This spy vs. spy thriller is smart, tense and rippling with topicality. Leonardo DiCaprio's deceptively rugged CIA agent masterminds the capture of a new world-class terrorist (Alon Abutbul) despite the bungling and interference of his Langley, Va.-based boss (Russell Crowe). The actor creates an existential juggler throwing a fistful of knives in midair - and DiCaprio doesn't drop a single blade.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2013
Center Stage could easily have chosen a work of great dramatic depth and weight to open its 51st season - some masterwork of the vast American theatrical canon, like, say, Eugene O'Neill's "Strange Interlude" from 1928. But, noooooooo. Instead, the company managed to drag up another piece from the very same year, one that dares mock that O'Neill drama, not to mention all that is sacred about society, art, business, honor and romance. To which theater-goers all over Baltimore should respond with one word: Hooray.
FEATURES
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | April 17, 2006
As it gears up for its 43rd year, Center Stage is planning a challenging slate of shows for its 2006-2007 season - and an even more ambitious fundraising campaign. The offerings for next year include a masterpiece of Russian theater, a bittersweet comedy by American literary giant Eugene O'Neill, a psychological thriller, a musical version of Shakespeare's The Comedy of Errors and a play that explores the obstacles faced by black performers in the mid-20th century. And just as the Center Stage staff is finessing what audiences see inside its two theaters, administrators also are fine-tuning how they will see it. A $6.8 million fundraising campaign, now beginning its public phase, will be used partly to renovate the Center Stage lobby and to upgrade scenery, lighting and sound systems.
NEWS
By Arthur Laupus and Arthur Laupus,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 25, 2001
Ever wish that you could gather all your conflicts, repressed sexual longings, neurotic tendencies, ambivalent feelings and obsessive-compulsive habits, write about them in the form of a successful play or movie, become a celebrity, win literary prizes and make a heck of a lot of money? Perhaps the best example of a playwright who examined his life and familial relationships with the psycho-therapeutic pen is Eugene O'Neill. Born of a morphine-addicted mother and embittered alcoholic father, O'Neill turned to his older brother Jamie for support and advice.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 20, 1998
At the O'Neill Theater Center in Waterford, Conn., the drama is usually confined to the staged readings of 12 new plays presented each July.But this year, those in attendance reportedly were gasping -- and some even moved to tears -- before the first play premiered. This emotion was generated when Lloyd Richards, artistic director of the O'Neill's prestigious National Playwrights Conference, announced that he will step down at the end of next summer's conference.Richards, who rose to national prominence when he directed the Broadway premiere of "A Raisin in the Sun" in 1959, has shaped and guided the Playwrights Conference since 1968.
NEWS
April 9, 1997
Gino Santi,81, who led the design and development of the first U.S. ejection seat for military aircraft, died of cancer Thursday in Dayton, Ohio.Mr. Santi served in the Army Air Forces during World War II and later became project engineer on the team that developed the ejection seat in 1949. He also is credited with inventing a prototype for air bags used in automobiles and an automatic-opening lap belt used in military aircraft.Travis Bogard,79, one of the foremost experts on the life and works of playwright Eugene O'Neill, died Saturday in Berkeley, Calif.
NEWS
August 25, 1996
Eugene O'Neill (1888-1953) was born in New York to an actor father and drug-addicted mother. His brother was an alcoholic, and the illnesses and depression that dogged O'Neill through his life set in during his youth.He went to Princeton University but left after a year. He spent the next several years as a seaman in Buenos Aires, prospecting for gold in Honduras and working as an actor and journalist.In 1912, after attempting suicide and entering a tuberculosis sanitarium, he decided to be a playwright.
FEATURES
By Jenny Komatsu and Jenny Komatsu,Contributing Writer | September 17, 1995
The National Playwrights Conference and New Drama for Media Project of the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center are accepting scripts to be considered for the July 1996 conference.The conference is devoted to discovering gifted writers and helping them to develop their talents. Submit original, full-length works for stage, screen or television that have never been produced and are not under option.Writers must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents of the United States. The deadline is Dec. 1. For an application, send a self-addressed stamped No. 10 envelope to National Playwrights Conference, Eugene O'Neill Theater Center, 234 W. 44th St., Suite 901, New York, N.Y. 10036.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 29, 1991
The name Jason Robards conjures up images of the hard-living, hard-drinking characters of Eugene O'Neill -- Hickey, the traveling salesman, in "The Iceman Cometh" or Jamie Tyrone in "Long Day's Journey Into Night" and "The Moon for the Misbegotten."But what has him excited these days is "Park Your Car in Harvard Yard," Israel Horovitz's new play, which is being billed as "touchingly funny" -- and which begins a pre-Broadway run at the Mechanic Theatre Tuesday.Is this casting against type?
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 20, 1998
At the O'Neill Theater Center in Waterford, Conn., the drama is usually confined to the staged readings of 12 new plays presented each July.But this year, those in attendance reportedly were gasping -- and some even moved to tears -- before the first play premiered. This emotion was generated when Lloyd Richards, artistic director of the O'Neill's prestigious National Playwrights Conference, announced that he will step down at the end of next summer's conference.Richards, who rose to national prominence when he directed the Broadway premiere of "A Raisin in the Sun" in 1959, has shaped and guided the Playwrights Conference since 1968.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 29, 1991
The name Jason Robards conjures up images of the hard-living, hard-drinking characters of Eugene O'Neill -- Hickey, the traveling salesman, in "The Iceman Cometh" or Jamie Tyrone in "Long Day's Journey Into Night" and "The Moon for the Misbegotten."But what has him excited these days is "Park Your Car in Harvard Yard," Israel Horovitz's new play, which is being billed as "touchingly funny" -- and which begins a pre-Broadway run at the Mechanic Theatre Tuesday.Is this casting against type?
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 4, 1991
/TC Waterford, Conn. -- Critics might seem like the last people a budding playwright would want to have around.But at the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center, the critics aren't scouting out hits or flops.Known as "critic fellows," they're participants in one of the O'Neill's more unusual programs -- the National Critics Institute. An intensive series of workshops and seminars for working professionals, the Institute is held each July, concurrent with the National Playwrights Conference, one of the pre-eminent new-play programs in the country.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.