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Eudora Welty

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By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Staff Writer | September 12, 1994
Eudora Welty is a gifted short story writer, but she is also an exceptional essayist and, as this book demonstrates, a superb book reviewer. In this collection of 67 reviews that Ms. Welty wrote over 42 years, she demonstrates uncommon intelligence and perception in a genre that often imposes severe limitations upon its practitioner.Book reviewing may be viewed as the first line of literary criticism. Reviews are written when a book is published, and so reviewers have relatively little time to ponder the works before them.
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By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,[Special to The Sun] | October 28, 2007
Due Considerations By John Updike Knopf / 736 pages / $32 Some writers are acquired tastes - the literary versions of anchovies and smelly cheeses. Others are staples - the bread and milk of the literary larder. John Updike is somehow both: so prolific as to be a staple, so frequently arcane as to be an acquired taste. His latest collection of essays and criticism, Due Considerations, is well over 700 pages and contains literary musings on everything but the kitchen sink (although the piece on the longevity of Coco Chanel or the one on coins vs. paper money might qualify as a metaphoric kitchen sink)
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FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2003
WASHINGTON - Literary scholars often pore over early works of important writers, intent on finding the themes, preoccupations and imagery that would later become so familiar. The renowned Southern Gothic writer Eudora Welty gave scholars something more to chew on. Before publication of Welty's first collection of short stories, she considered a career in photography. As a young woman in the Depression, Welty traveled her home state of Mississippi (with forays to New Orleans and New York City)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Charles Ealy and Charles Ealy,Knight Ridder / Tribune | August 21, 2005
BIOGRAPHY EUDORA WELTY: A BIOGRAPHY By Suzanne Marrs. Harcourt. 672 pages After a reductive 1998 biography by Ann Waldron and an insulting New Yorker article by Claudia Roth Pierpont, it's heartening to report that a new biography of Eudora Welty captures the humorous and unconventional spirit of one of the South's greatest writers. In Eudora Welty: A Biography, Suzanne Marrs manages to put the life and work of Welty in proper perspective, with the aid of numerous letters that are being made public for the first time.
NEWS
By Evan L. Balkan | July 26, 2001
THE HIGHLY respected American writer Eudora Welty, who died Sunday at a hospital in Mississippi, was widely considered one of the 20th century's best American writers. Because she lived through most of it, dying at age 92, this assessment is as literal as it is hyperbolic. The high-water mark of her literary career came in 1973, when she won a Pulitzer Prize for her novel, The Optimist's Daughter. Like Emily Dickinson before her, Ms. Welty was one of those rare writers who could offer a tremendous output, a world of work, without ever really leaving her home.
NEWS
By DIANE SCHARPER | November 20, 1991
''Up in Tishomingo County (Mississippi), I knew that my continuing passion would be to part the curtain that falls between people,'' Eudora Welty writes in the preface to her book of photographs. The faces in those photographs, Miss Welty explains, are full of meaning, more truthful, more terrible, more noble than any generalization could describe. They tell the story of life. It was to learn more about this story that Miss Welty began writing fiction.Eighty-two-year-old Eudora Welty has been writing for some 55 years.
FEATURES
May 31, 1998
Eudora Welty(1909 - )Is considered, by some, to be the most distinguished surviving writer of the Southern Renaissance. Born in Jackson. Miss., she attended college at Mississippi State College for Women from 1925-27. Initially, her literary work was not well received. However, by the late 1930s her work began to appear in magazines. She is best known for her short stories, such as: "A Curtain of Green," "The Robber Bridegroom" and "Delta Wedding." In 1973, she won a Pulitzer Prize for "The Optimist's Daughter."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Charles Ealy and Charles Ealy,Knight Ridder / Tribune | August 21, 2005
BIOGRAPHY EUDORA WELTY: A BIOGRAPHY By Suzanne Marrs. Harcourt. 672 pages After a reductive 1998 biography by Ann Waldron and an insulting New Yorker article by Claudia Roth Pierpont, it's heartening to report that a new biography of Eudora Welty captures the humorous and unconventional spirit of one of the South's greatest writers. In Eudora Welty: A Biography, Suzanne Marrs manages to put the life and work of Welty in proper perspective, with the aid of numerous letters that are being made public for the first time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Special to the Sun | July 29, 2001
When I arrived for my interview with Eudora Welty, the renowned writer already was seated at a table in the hotel dining room, drinking coffee. She greeted me with a smile and then apologized for being early, explaining she couldn't resist the chance to "overhear" the kind of stories people told one another over breakfast. "I've already heard one or two good ones," she said. Listening to people talk, she told me on that warm autumn day in 1988, was something she'd enjoyed all her life.
FEATURES
By ANN G. SJOERDSMA | September 23, 1990
American Stories: FictionFrom The Atlantic Monthly.Edited by C. Michael Curtis.Chronicle Books.239 pages. $9.95 (paperback).In this age of literary minimalism, in which a hastily drawn sketch passes for a character portrait and "things-as-they-are" observations substitute for insight, it is gratifying and refreshing to read stories peopled with full-bodied, emotionally layered characters and steeped in smart everyday situational irony.Of the 20 short stories selected for inclusion in "American Stories: Fiction From The Atlantic Monthly," senior editor C. Michael Curtis writes: "Something happens."
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2003
WASHINGTON - Literary scholars often pore over early works of important writers, intent on finding the themes, preoccupations and imagery that would later become so familiar. The renowned Southern Gothic writer Eudora Welty gave scholars something more to chew on. Before publication of Welty's first collection of short stories, she considered a career in photography. As a young woman in the Depression, Welty traveled her home state of Mississippi (with forays to New Orleans and New York City)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Special to the Sun | July 29, 2001
When I arrived for my interview with Eudora Welty, the renowned writer already was seated at a table in the hotel dining room, drinking coffee. She greeted me with a smile and then apologized for being early, explaining she couldn't resist the chance to "overhear" the kind of stories people told one another over breakfast. "I've already heard one or two good ones," she said. Listening to people talk, she told me on that warm autumn day in 1988, was something she'd enjoyed all her life.
NEWS
By Evan L. Balkan | July 26, 2001
THE HIGHLY respected American writer Eudora Welty, who died Sunday at a hospital in Mississippi, was widely considered one of the 20th century's best American writers. Because she lived through most of it, dying at age 92, this assessment is as literal as it is hyperbolic. The high-water mark of her literary career came in 1973, when she won a Pulitzer Prize for her novel, The Optimist's Daughter. Like Emily Dickinson before her, Ms. Welty was one of those rare writers who could offer a tremendous output, a world of work, without ever really leaving her home.
FEATURES
May 31, 1998
Eudora Welty(1909 - )Is considered, by some, to be the most distinguished surviving writer of the Southern Renaissance. Born in Jackson. Miss., she attended college at Mississippi State College for Women from 1925-27. Initially, her literary work was not well received. However, by the late 1930s her work began to appear in magazines. She is best known for her short stories, such as: "A Curtain of Green," "The Robber Bridegroom" and "Delta Wedding." In 1973, she won a Pulitzer Prize for "The Optimist's Daughter."
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Staff Writer | September 12, 1994
Eudora Welty is a gifted short story writer, but she is also an exceptional essayist and, as this book demonstrates, a superb book reviewer. In this collection of 67 reviews that Ms. Welty wrote over 42 years, she demonstrates uncommon intelligence and perception in a genre that often imposes severe limitations upon its practitioner.Book reviewing may be viewed as the first line of literary criticism. Reviews are written when a book is published, and so reviewers have relatively little time to ponder the works before them.
NEWS
By DIANE SCHARPER | November 20, 1991
''Up in Tishomingo County (Mississippi), I knew that my continuing passion would be to part the curtain that falls between people,'' Eudora Welty writes in the preface to her book of photographs. The faces in those photographs, Miss Welty explains, are full of meaning, more truthful, more terrible, more noble than any generalization could describe. They tell the story of life. It was to learn more about this story that Miss Welty began writing fiction.Eighty-two-year-old Eudora Welty has been writing for some 55 years.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,[Special to The Sun] | October 28, 2007
Due Considerations By John Updike Knopf / 736 pages / $32 Some writers are acquired tastes - the literary versions of anchovies and smelly cheeses. Others are staples - the bread and milk of the literary larder. John Updike is somehow both: so prolific as to be a staple, so frequently arcane as to be an acquired taste. His latest collection of essays and criticism, Due Considerations, is well over 700 pages and contains literary musings on everything but the kitchen sink (although the piece on the longevity of Coco Chanel or the one on coins vs. paper money might qualify as a metaphoric kitchen sink)
NEWS
October 31, 2003
County Arts Council offers 2 free lectures on women artists The Carroll County Arts Council will offer two free lectures next week on women artists that complement the current exhibit, The Gaia Girls: Re-calling the Goddess. Both lectures will be led by Susan Williamson, the council's visual arts coordinator. "Women Artists of the Surrealist Movement: Frida Kahlo, Remedios Varo & Leonora Carrington" will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday. The movieFrida was released last year on the life of Kahlo, who, with Varo and Carrington, played major roles in the surrealist movement in Mexico.
FEATURES
By ANN G. SJOERDSMA | September 23, 1990
American Stories: FictionFrom The Atlantic Monthly.Edited by C. Michael Curtis.Chronicle Books.239 pages. $9.95 (paperback).In this age of literary minimalism, in which a hastily drawn sketch passes for a character portrait and "things-as-they-are" observations substitute for insight, it is gratifying and refreshing to read stories peopled with full-bodied, emotionally layered characters and steeped in smart everyday situational irony.Of the 20 short stories selected for inclusion in "American Stories: Fiction From The Atlantic Monthly," senior editor C. Michael Curtis writes: "Something happens."
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