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NEWS
November 1, 1992
Ralph Ettlinger, an inventor and co-developer of a health care program that serves the elderly in their homes, died of cancer Wednesday at the Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis.A native of Kansas City, Mo., the 75-year-old graduated from Northwestern University. He served as an officer in the Navy in World War II.He was a longtime resident of Highland Park and Glencoe in Illinois before retiring to Heritage Harbour in Annapolis eight years ago.Mr. Ettlinger had 18 patents in the food-service industry, including one for a plastic dish washing rack.
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NEWS
By PATRICK T. REARDON | January 22, 2006
Poet Mark Strand calls dust-jacket photos "the door to the dark room of the imagination." Even though a writer's looks have little to do with the words he or she puts down on paper, many a reader, during the course of a gripping or particularly insightful book, will turn to the author's photo, trying to plumb its mysteries. Justine Larbalestier, an Australian science fiction writer and historian, is ambivalent about dust-jacket photos. She's even tried, unsuccessfully, to persuade her publishers to go without her photo.
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NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2001
A report on what to do about radium found in private Pasadena well water is expected to be released this summer, but it isn't written by the community task force formed to study the issue. Instead, the report has been written by the panel's former chairman, who quit over what he called a failure by members to be objective. The group then disbanded, and Lester Ettlinger, who called the committee's deadlock "hopeless," wrote the report. The seven-member group, the Pasadena Citizens Task Force on Radium in Well Water, was split between those who wanted to connect the peninsula to public water and those who didn't.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2002
Noting budget constraints, the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development has determined that it can't offer loans and grants to middle-income families in northern Anne Arundel County for treating radium-tainted wells. A report, which the department sent last week to the leaders of the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee and the House Appropriations Committee, lists several loan and grant programs for low-income families who must upgrade their wells. Families with incomes of more than $53,000 don't qualify for assistance.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and By Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2001
A report to be released today on a cancer-causing agent in Pasadena well water concludes that taking public water to the peninsula would spawn increased development, but members of a task force formed to study the issue have disavowed its findings. The 70-page report, written by environmental risk consultant Lester A. Ettlinger, also calls for wells countywide to be tested for radium and asks for a geological survey to determine the extent of radium contamination in Pasadena, according to those familiar with the report.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2000
If Lester A. Ettlinger hadn't wanted to meet his neighbors that night in April, the subject of anhydrous ammonia might never have come up. Solley peninsula residents might not have learned about the hazardous chemical, nor of Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s plans to truck it daily into the Brandon Shores power plant. And BGE officials might be concentrating on building their anhydrous ammonia-based anti-pollution system instead of dealing with community outrage. But Ettlinger, an environmental risk consultant who moved to the area in March, did go to the April 10 Stoney Beach community meeting, hoping to get to know some of his new neighbors.
NEWS
By NORRIS WEST | August 13, 2000
COME on in, Lester Ettlinger said, ushering me to the deck of his Stoney Beach townhouse. "I want to show you why I don't want this bad stuff in my neighborhood." The deck overlooks Mr. Ettlinger's personal paradise, a narrow stretch of sandy beach that hugs calm Stony Creek, which spills into the Patapsco River. In the creek, a loon plunged into the water to fish. Speedboats raced past. Ducks flew overhead. So did a hawk. It's peaceful here. This is perfection to Mr. Ettlinger, who moved to Stoney Beach in March after living most of his 61 years in Baltimore's Mount Washington neighborhood.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2002
Noting budget constraints, the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development has determined that it can't offer loans and grants to middle-income families in northern Anne Arundel County for treating radium-tainted wells. A report, which the department sent last week to the leaders of the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee and the House Appropriations Committee, lists several loan and grant programs for low-income families who must upgrade their wells. Families with incomes of more than $53,000 don't qualify for assistance.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2001
A proposal by Anne Arundel County legislators that would earmark state money to help homeowners pay for equipment to remove radium from their well water won support yesterday from Maryland Housing Secretary Raymond A. Skinner. In a brief hearing before the House Appropriations Committee's Health and Human Resources Subcommittee, District 31 Dels. John R. Leopold, a Republican, and Joan Cadden, a Democrat, presented language for the 2002 state budget that would create sliding-scale loans or grants for households.
NEWS
By NORRIS WEST | October 15, 2000
THIS COULD BE Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s last chance to befriend its neighbors. I thought the utility was finally mending its fractured relationship with the northeastern Anne Arundel County community when it agreed to stop storing fly ash - a byproduct of coal-burning - at its Brandon Shores plant. The company and the community had battled for 17 years, and peace finally was at hand. Then came anhydrous ammonia and more mistrust. Peace is here again. The utility has dropped plans to truck potentially hazardous anhydrous ammonia in favor of a community-approved ammonia substance it will use to reduce nitrogen oxide while burning coal.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and By Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2001
A report to be released today on a cancer-causing agent in Pasadena well water concludes that taking public water to the peninsula would spawn increased development, but members of a task force formed to study the issue have disavowed its findings. The 70-page report, written by environmental risk consultant Lester A. Ettlinger, also calls for wells countywide to be tested for radium and asks for a geological survey to determine the extent of radium contamination in Pasadena, according to those familiar with the report.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2001
A report on what to do about radium found in private Pasadena well water is expected to be released this summer, but it isn't written by the community task force formed to study the issue. Instead, the report has been written by the panel's former chairman, who quit over what he called a failure by members to be objective. The group then disbanded, and Lester Ettlinger, who called the committee's deadlock "hopeless," wrote the report. The seven-member group, the Pasadena Citizens Task Force on Radium in Well Water, was split between those who wanted to connect the peninsula to public water and those who didn't.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2001
A proposal by Anne Arundel County legislators that would earmark state money to help homeowners pay for equipment to remove radium from their well water won support yesterday from Maryland Housing Secretary Raymond A. Skinner. In a brief hearing before the House Appropriations Committee's Health and Human Resources Subcommittee, District 31 Dels. John R. Leopold, a Republican, and Joan Cadden, a Democrat, presented language for the 2002 state budget that would create sliding-scale loans or grants for households.
NEWS
By NORRIS WEST | October 15, 2000
THIS COULD BE Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s last chance to befriend its neighbors. I thought the utility was finally mending its fractured relationship with the northeastern Anne Arundel County community when it agreed to stop storing fly ash - a byproduct of coal-burning - at its Brandon Shores plant. The company and the community had battled for 17 years, and peace finally was at hand. Then came anhydrous ammonia and more mistrust. Peace is here again. The utility has dropped plans to truck potentially hazardous anhydrous ammonia in favor of a community-approved ammonia substance it will use to reduce nitrogen oxide while burning coal.
NEWS
By NORRIS WEST | August 13, 2000
COME on in, Lester Ettlinger said, ushering me to the deck of his Stoney Beach townhouse. "I want to show you why I don't want this bad stuff in my neighborhood." The deck overlooks Mr. Ettlinger's personal paradise, a narrow stretch of sandy beach that hugs calm Stony Creek, which spills into the Patapsco River. In the creek, a loon plunged into the water to fish. Speedboats raced past. Ducks flew overhead. So did a hawk. It's peaceful here. This is perfection to Mr. Ettlinger, who moved to Stoney Beach in March after living most of his 61 years in Baltimore's Mount Washington neighborhood.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2000
If Lester A. Ettlinger hadn't wanted to meet his neighbors that night in April, the subject of anhydrous ammonia might never have come up. Solley peninsula residents might not have learned about the hazardous chemical, nor of Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s plans to truck it daily into the Brandon Shores power plant. And BGE officials might be concentrating on building their anhydrous ammonia-based anti-pollution system instead of dealing with community outrage. But Ettlinger, an environmental risk consultant who moved to the area in March, did go to the April 10 Stoney Beach community meeting, hoping to get to know some of his new neighbors.
NEWS
By PATRICK T. REARDON | January 22, 2006
Poet Mark Strand calls dust-jacket photos "the door to the dark room of the imagination." Even though a writer's looks have little to do with the words he or she puts down on paper, many a reader, during the course of a gripping or particularly insightful book, will turn to the author's photo, trying to plumb its mysteries. Justine Larbalestier, an Australian science fiction writer and historian, is ambivalent about dust-jacket photos. She's even tried, unsuccessfully, to persuade her publishers to go without her photo.
NEWS
November 1, 1992
Ralph Ettlinger, an inventor and co-developer of a health care program that serves the elderly in their homes, died of cancer Wednesday at the Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis.A native of Kansas City, Mo., the 75-year-old graduated from Northwestern University. He served as an officer in the Navy in World War II.He was a longtime resident of Highland Park and Glencoe in Illinois before retiring to Heritage Harbour in Annapolis eight years ago.Mr. Ettlinger had 18 patents in the food-service industry, including one for a plastic dish washing rack.
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