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By John E. McIntyre and Th | May 21, 2012
I have been brooding for the past week over a part of a comment at the Language Log post "A half century of usage denialism," in which Deniz Rudin writes: "Descriptivism is an investigatory approach to the formal study of language, and it is uncontroversial in linguistics departments because it is the only sane approach - nobody opposes descriptivism in biology, or argues for a prescriptivist physics. Prescriptivism, on the other hand, is a branch of etiquette columnry - prescriptivists advise us of what the more embarrassing solecisms are, so that we can in avoiding them be judged by the cultured to be one of their own. " Now I know where this is coming from.
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NEWS
May 20, 2014
Susan Reimer 's column on elevator etiquette omits the cardinal rule of etiquette I saw riding a multitude of elevators over the years in New York City ( "Elevator etiquette dropping fast," May 16). In Class A office buildings like the Chrysler Building, men - in that hard-boiled, the faster-the-better city - have preserved an act of unexpected politeness. No gentleman steps into an elevator before a lady in New York. Ladies board first. How 1886! Eileen Pollock, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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FEATURES
May 2, 1994
Does familiarity breed contempt or community?If you live in a rowhouse, you know that the answer is a little bit of both. The Sun would like to hear your tales of rowhouse living. Does your neighbor refuse to take his privacy fence down even though it doesn't conform to code? Does your other neighbor's stove vent pump recycled steak fumes into your house?Or do you live in harmony with your neighbors, using the same color trim on your adjoining abodes, mowing each other's lawns and merging postage-stamp backyards into an urban oasis?
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 16, 2014
In 1886, the New York Times and the Chicago News engaged in a mild war of words over whether it is necessary for a gentleman to remove his hat on an elevator when there are ladies in the car. More than 100 years later, the estimable Miss Manners, the final authority on all things polite and impolite, was asked to enumerate the rules of elevator etiquette. Her most memorable declaration might have been that if you fail to successfully hold the door open for an approaching passenger "assume a look of regretful ineptitude to show that person that nothing personal was intended.
FEATURES
By Jamie Bacon, For The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
Everyone has an opinion on engagement parties and what is appropriate or not appropriate. Not every engaged couple has an engagement party, but if you do want to have one, it's important to think through the details. It should be far enough away from the wedding so that people don't worry about spending a ton of money on separate gifts for the same people. If the engagement party is just a month or two before the wedding, the couple may come off as greedy, since they will be asking guests to spend money on the engagement present, a shower present, and a wedding present in a short amount of time.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
When students in the Howard County after-school program Can-Teen say "please" and "thank you," they scarcely sound as if they were once nagged or scolded into doing so. Instead, their expressions of gratitude appear to be just that, and they understand why such expressions are warranted. Sound strange for a group of more than a dozen teens? Not according to Taurean Washington, the youth director for the Can-Teen program, a county recreation and parks program that teaches leadership skills and etiquette.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2013
With "Downton Abbey" about to start Season 3 on these shores this weekend, taking us once more into the rarefied world of British society and grand meals around elegantly appointed tables, your ever-thoughtful Midweek Madness featurette would like to offer this quick refresher on the rules of social etiquette, especially those pertaining to the gentler sex. As you know, the women in "Downton Abbey" sometimes forget their place, which can have devastating...
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | November 30, 1996
Does this sound familiar?:"Tell the nice man, 'Thank you.' "Most kids have plenty to learn about manners, those classic rules of behavior. The holiday season can feel like a manners boot camp, and that's where Ann Humphries steps in."I was a parent who had no idea how to teach manners," she NTC says. "I remember barking at my kids and thinking there must be a better way."After teaching bite-size manners seminars for parents and asking kids what they knew about being polite, Humphries has released her second video, "Proud to Be Polite."
NEWS
By Russ Mullaly | August 7, 1991
Has anyone noticed that rudeness and lack of consideration in publicplaces seem to be spreading? That more and more people don't seem toknow or care how to act in public?We all know how things have degenerated in movie theaters, where people talk and make noise while viewing a film. Remember the incident in a Columbia movie theater where one young man assaulted another because he was asked to please be quiet so others could enjoy the film?This is why video rentals are popular. It's cheaper and you have control over the atmosphere in the viewing area.
FEATURES
By Diane Winston | April 10, 1991
Politely but firmly, Miss Manners looked straight at seventy-odd students, teachers and aficionados of philosophy and took the whole lot to task."I came here to complain," the arbiter of etiquette told a roomful of academics at Johns Hopkins University. "Philosophers are not paying enough attention to manners."Judith Martin, whose alter ego "Miss Manners" is beloved by million of readers nationwide, was the guest speaker yesterday at a philosophy department seminar in the Milton Eisenhower Library.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jaclyn Peiser and The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Wedding etiquette doesn't just involve knowing which fork to use when eating your starter salad -- it's way more than that. It could involve thank-you notes, destination weddings and deciding who pays that hefty reception bill. We asked Lizzie Post of the Emily Post Institute (emilypost.com) and co-author, with her sister Anna, of "Emily Post Wedding Etiquette, 6th Edition," about how to approach those awkward situations that may arise when planning your wedding. If it's a destination wedding, is the couple responsible to pay for at least part of the expenses of guests?
NEWS
February 25, 2014
Unfortunately, not everyone lives in a friendly and honest neighborhood. I have lived in Columbia, Ellicott City, Catonsville, Arbutus and Westminster, and I would never frown upon people who shoveled the snow in their parking space and marked it ( "The chair in the parking space: A symbol of incivility," Feb. 19). They took the time to come outside during the night and early morning hours to make sure they could get out to go to work and come home the spot they had cleared. Growing up in Columbia, my parents would stay up until all hours of the night to help shovel snow and bring hot coffee to the workers.
NEWS
February 24, 2014
The chair I put in my cleared parking space during the last major snowstorm did not scream I was "uninterested in the public good" but rather of the hard work that went into clearing not only my spot but the three others I helped my neighbors dig out as well ( "The chair in the parking space: A symbol of incivility," Feb. 19). Our band of snow shovelers was out together talking about how great it was to be able to see each other. And while we were moving that wet, heavy snow, we commented on the fact that we really didn't want to see a plow since we already had cleared everything from the curb to the center of the street.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
Since screening the Season 2 premiere of “House of Cards” almost two weeks ago, I have been dying to talk about a showstopper of a moment in it. But even though Netflix made all 13 episodes of the second season available to the public Friday, I still don't feel I can discuss what I saw without spoiling the surprise for some fans online or in social media. Spoilers have long been an issue with DVR and on-demand viewing. But the new streaming, all-episodes-at-once distribution model introduced by Netflix with the launch of “House of Cards” last year has complicated the matter exponentially.
FEATURES
By Jamie Bacon, For The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
Everyone has an opinion on engagement parties and what is appropriate or not appropriate. Not every engaged couple has an engagement party, but if you do want to have one, it's important to think through the details. It should be far enough away from the wedding so that people don't worry about spending a ton of money on separate gifts for the same people. If the engagement party is just a month or two before the wedding, the couple may come off as greedy, since they will be asking guests to spend money on the engagement present, a shower present, and a wedding present in a short amount of time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2013
With "Downton Abbey" about to start Season 3 on these shores this weekend, taking us once more into the rarefied world of British society and grand meals around elegantly appointed tables, your ever-thoughtful Midweek Madness featurette would like to offer this quick refresher on the rules of social etiquette, especially those pertaining to the gentler sex. As you know, the women in "Downton Abbey" sometimes forget their place, which can have devastating...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 26, 1995
JERUSALEM -- The Israeli telephone company, Bezeq, has decided that Israelis need to be more polite on the phone.Lack of basic courtesy has become a problem, the company says, especially with a rapid proliferation of cellular phones and an Israeli tendency to carry -- and scream into -- them everywhere.When it discovered people gabbing away at graveside during funerals, Bezeq sensed that the trend had gone too far."The rabbi's saying the prayers, and here's this fellow talking on the phone!"
NEWS
By KIM HONE-MCMAHAN and KIM HONE-MCMAHAN,MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | August 20, 2006
Remember the Seinfeld episode "The Kiss Hello"? The hysterical 30-minute segment in which every woman in Jerry's apartment building was puckered up when they greeted him? The one in which Jerry slapped a moratorium on hello smooches? "Uh, listen. I decided I can't kiss hello anymore. I'm sorry. It's nothing personal. It just makes me a little uncomfortable and I can't do it. I'm sorry," he said, after backing away from a neighbor posed to plant a quick one. Summer is a time for weddings, high school reunions and bumping into acquaintances on the walking trail.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
When students in the Howard County after-school program Can-Teen say "please" and "thank you," they scarcely sound as if they were once nagged or scolded into doing so. Instead, their expressions of gratitude appear to be just that, and they understand why such expressions are warranted. Sound strange for a group of more than a dozen teens? Not according to Taurean Washington, the youth director for the Can-Teen program, a county recreation and parks program that teaches leadership skills and etiquette.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and Th | May 21, 2012
I have been brooding for the past week over a part of a comment at the Language Log post "A half century of usage denialism," in which Deniz Rudin writes: "Descriptivism is an investigatory approach to the formal study of language, and it is uncontroversial in linguistics departments because it is the only sane approach - nobody opposes descriptivism in biology, or argues for a prescriptivist physics. Prescriptivism, on the other hand, is a branch of etiquette columnry - prescriptivists advise us of what the more embarrassing solecisms are, so that we can in avoiding them be judged by the cultured to be one of their own. " Now I know where this is coming from.
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