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NEWS
March 2, 1995
Sidney Robertson Cowell, 92, an ethnomusicologist, writer and widow of composer Henry Cowell, died Thursday at her home in Shady, N.Y. In her extensive travels from 1937 to 1957, she recorded American, Finnish, Irish, Portuguese, Iranian and Turkish folk music, among other types. Her collection, housed in the Library of Congress, is among the most extensive ever gathered and includes some of the earliest documentation of ethnic music in the United States.
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FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | January 17, 2004
It's a place where you can get down-home food - fried okra, smothered steak, hot cornbread - and lemonade comes in a jar. The antiques and old product memorabilia adorning Cracker Barrel Old Country Store restaurants evoke a nostalgic early-American charm. Music was missing from the homey ambience. But not anymore. To extend the traditional theme, Cracker Barrel has created a new independent label, CB Music Ltd., a wholly owned subsidiary of the interstate restaurant chain that records a variety of traditional and ethnic music.
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NEWS
October 22, 1995
Don Cherry, 58, a trumpeter who played with the top jazz musicians, died Thursday of liver failure near Malaga, Spain. A native of Oklahoma, he began his career studying the works of trumpeter "Fats" Theodore Navarro. But his music soared above jazz to incorporate funk and ethnic music, folk and pop. He began playing professionally as a teen-ager. In 1956, he met saxophonist and composer Ornette Coleman. Two years later they began recording with pianist Paul Bley, bassists Charlie Haden and drummer Billy Higgins.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | August 10, 2000
Mary J. Blige When Grammy Award-winning singer Mary J. Blige performs tomorrow at the Baltimore Arena, 201 W. Baltimore St., you'll be treated to soul sounds and hip-hop tunes. Expect to hear such hits as "Love Is All You Need," "Share My World" and "You Gotta Believe." The Mary Show starts at 7:30 p.m. Also appearing are Jagged Edge and Avant. Tickets are $40. Call 410-481-SEAT. Kunta Kinte Festival Celebrate the heritage, culture, history, music and cuisine of Africans, African-Americans and African-Caribbeans at the 13th annual Kunta Kinte Heritage Festival this weekend on the grounds of St. John's College in Annapolis.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | February 11, 1991
Here's the reason why concerts of new music are usually much less enjoyable than programs of older music: The latter get screened for quality by time. That makes yesterday's concert by the New York New Music Ensemble at the Baltimore Museum of Art all the more remarkable. Three of the four pieces on the program, which was presented by the Chamber Music Society of Baltimore, were genuinely enjoyable and promised to reward repeated listening.Perhaps the most intriguing was Stephen Mackey's 23-minute "Indigenous Instruments" (1989)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | August 10, 2000
Mary J. Blige When Grammy Award-winning singer Mary J. Blige performs tomorrow at the Baltimore Arena, 201 W. Baltimore St., you'll be treated to soul sounds and hip-hop tunes. Expect to hear such hits as "Love Is All You Need," "Share My World" and "You Gotta Believe." The Mary Show starts at 7:30 p.m. Also appearing are Jagged Edge and Avant. Tickets are $40. Call 410-481-SEAT. Kunta Kinte Festival Celebrate the heritage, culture, history, music and cuisine of Africans, African-Americans and African-Caribbeans at the 13th annual Kunta Kinte Heritage Festival this weekend on the grounds of St. John's College in Annapolis.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and Bonnie J. Schupp and David Michael Ettlin and Bonnie J. Schupp,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 1997
Ariana isn't much to look at -- a small restaurant, tucked into a little shopping strip in quarters formerly home to a video game store. But a restaurant doesn't have to look glamorous to succeed, so long as the food is right.At Ariana, the food is just that, with spices and dishes from Afghanistan, India, Greece and the Middle East. They're homemade and served by owner Fahima Vorgetts, working alongside her family to the tune of ethnic music (Persian and Pakistani on our last visit).The decor is simple, with rugs and Middle Eastern dresses on the walls, and red diamond-patterned fabric muting what would have been harsh fluorescent lights overhead.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | January 17, 2004
It's a place where you can get down-home food - fried okra, smothered steak, hot cornbread - and lemonade comes in a jar. The antiques and old product memorabilia adorning Cracker Barrel Old Country Store restaurants evoke a nostalgic early-American charm. Music was missing from the homey ambience. But not anymore. To extend the traditional theme, Cracker Barrel has created a new independent label, CB Music Ltd., a wholly owned subsidiary of the interstate restaurant chain that records a variety of traditional and ethnic music.
NEWS
By Michael R. Driscoll and Michael R. Driscoll,Staff writer | April 10, 1992
Musically speaking, Anne Arundel County is a very small pond, amply stocked with some pretty big fish.Three of the larger fish -- jazz singer Sue Matthews, the rock band Edge City and the traditional folk trio known as Ceoltoiri (pronounced "kyultory") have released new albums that are wonderful examples of the top-notch, widely varied music available in the area.The Edge City album is called "Great Expectations," an indicationthat the band still hopes for the Break after years of plugging awayin the region's bars and clubs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2010
From the outside, Don Pedro's Musica Latina on Broadway looks like anything but a music store. You might guess it's a country-western emporium. Maybe even a secondhand sports-equipment store. Inside its display window, there are soccer balls, wool leopard-print comforters and dozens of sneaker boxes. But behind all that is where its real product lies: some 200,000 CDs from everywhere in Latin America. For years, Baltimore's ethnic music stores like this one were spared from the digital music revolution that consumed their American counterparts because of their deep catalogs.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and Bonnie J. Schupp and David Michael Ettlin and Bonnie J. Schupp,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 1997
Ariana isn't much to look at -- a small restaurant, tucked into a little shopping strip in quarters formerly home to a video game store. But a restaurant doesn't have to look glamorous to succeed, so long as the food is right.At Ariana, the food is just that, with spices and dishes from Afghanistan, India, Greece and the Middle East. They're homemade and served by owner Fahima Vorgetts, working alongside her family to the tune of ethnic music (Persian and Pakistani on our last visit).The decor is simple, with rugs and Middle Eastern dresses on the walls, and red diamond-patterned fabric muting what would have been harsh fluorescent lights overhead.
NEWS
October 22, 1995
Don Cherry, 58, a trumpeter who played with the top jazz musicians, died Thursday of liver failure near Malaga, Spain. A native of Oklahoma, he began his career studying the works of trumpeter "Fats" Theodore Navarro. But his music soared above jazz to incorporate funk and ethnic music, folk and pop. He began playing professionally as a teen-ager. In 1956, he met saxophonist and composer Ornette Coleman. Two years later they began recording with pianist Paul Bley, bassists Charlie Haden and drummer Billy Higgins.
NEWS
March 2, 1995
Sidney Robertson Cowell, 92, an ethnomusicologist, writer and widow of composer Henry Cowell, died Thursday at her home in Shady, N.Y. In her extensive travels from 1937 to 1957, she recorded American, Finnish, Irish, Portuguese, Iranian and Turkish folk music, among other types. Her collection, housed in the Library of Congress, is among the most extensive ever gathered and includes some of the earliest documentation of ethnic music in the United States.
NEWS
By Michael R. Driscoll and Michael R. Driscoll,Staff writer | April 10, 1992
Musically speaking, Anne Arundel County is a very small pond, amply stocked with some pretty big fish.Three of the larger fish -- jazz singer Sue Matthews, the rock band Edge City and the traditional folk trio known as Ceoltoiri (pronounced "kyultory") have released new albums that are wonderful examples of the top-notch, widely varied music available in the area.The Edge City album is called "Great Expectations," an indicationthat the band still hopes for the Break after years of plugging awayin the region's bars and clubs.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | February 11, 1991
Here's the reason why concerts of new music are usually much less enjoyable than programs of older music: The latter get screened for quality by time. That makes yesterday's concert by the New York New Music Ensemble at the Baltimore Museum of Art all the more remarkable. Three of the four pieces on the program, which was presented by the Chamber Music Society of Baltimore, were genuinely enjoyable and promised to reward repeated listening.Perhaps the most intriguing was Stephen Mackey's 23-minute "Indigenous Instruments" (1989)
NEWS
February 14, 1996
A visit to any large record store suggests "world music" and "world beat" discs and cassettes are big sellers. So long, American isolationism.At a time when U.S. pop music has conquered the world as never before, Americans in unprecedented numbers have discovered foreign pop and folk music. This is different from the weekend polka or bouzouki jamborees on ethnic radio stations. "World music" listeners typically have no ethnic connection to the music they want to hear."World music" is authentic ethnic music from foreign countries; "world beat" is crossover music like Brazilian bossa nova or certain types of rhythmic and harmonic creations based on West African highlife music.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | June 19, 1997
Midsummer Village FaireFor a weekend celebration including a summer solstice concert, puppet shows, militia muster, strolling musicians, arts and crafts, food and children's activities, attend the Midsummer Village Faire at Historic St. Mary's City.Sponsored by the Neighbors on the Historic Townlands, Historic St. Mary's City, St. Mary's College of Maryland and Trinity Parish, the two-day event also includes narrated river cruises along the St. Mary's River. And you can learn the fine art of creating a traditional Southern Maryland stuffed ham and other tasty morsels during cooking demonstrations.
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