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By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 12, 1999
LANGLEY, Va. -- WANTED: Smart, clean-living college and graduate students fluent in non-Romance languages. Minority group members and Turkish and Iranian U.S. citizens are especially welcome. A taste for foreign intrigue is required. That's the Central Intelligence Agency's pitch for its biggest recruiting drive since the Cold War ended. And it's working even better than spymasters expected. Applications more than doubled to 39,000 in the fiscal year that ended Sept. 30. They're expected to double again next year, and the drive should continue up to four more years.
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NEWS
January 7, 2011
Why would you print the nonsense of a right wing nativist bully like Patrick McDonough ( "Tuition 'Dream' a nightmare for taxpayers," Jan 7)? I can only think that the only reason would be to drive the fastest growing minority voting block into the welcome arms of the Democratic party for ages to come. Which is fine with me. But I think Delegate McDonough's xenophobic bullying against ethnic minorities should be pointed out during a time of economic distress, when a scapegoat is necessary.
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NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,sun reporter | January 21, 2007
On paper, Marcelino M. Bedolla appeared to be a good candidate for the Howard County Board of Education. A Hispanic science teacher in Baltimore who has lived in Howard County since 1970, Bedolla regularly voiced concern about student achievement among ethnic minorities and sought to increase offerings for all students, including those not planning to attend college. But that passion did not translate to a board seat for the 70-year-old Bedolla, who lost in 2000 and 2006. Of the four ethnic minority candidates who sought board seats last year, only Patricia Gordon - the first African-American elected to the board and an incumbent - won. "I expected a higher percentage of the vote [in 2006]
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,sun reporter | January 21, 2007
On paper, Marcelino M. Bedolla appeared to be a good candidate for the Howard County Board of Education. A Hispanic science teacher in Baltimore who has lived in Howard County since 1970, Bedolla regularly voiced concern about student achievement among ethnic minorities and sought to increase offerings for all students, including those not planning to attend college. But that passion did not translate to a board seat for the 70-year-old Bedolla, who lost in 2000 and 2006. Of the four ethnic minority candidates who sought board seats last year, only Patricia Gordon - the first African-American elected to the board and an incumbent - won. "I expected a higher percentage of the vote [in 2006]
NEWS
October 7, 1990
BALTIMORE - An 640-pound contractor has sued, contending the city should give him preferred status in bidding on municipal work because he is fat.Donald Keister, 30, of Baltimore filed suit Monday in Circuit Court, demanding the Minority Business Enterprise office certify him as a minority contractor, making him eligible for preferred status in bidding for city contracts.Keister owns a lead paint testing and removal business, including one in Westminster. He said he relies on city business, but often loses contracts because of his limited ability to inspect potential work sites and submit bids.
NEWS
January 7, 2011
Why would you print the nonsense of a right wing nativist bully like Patrick McDonough ( "Tuition 'Dream' a nightmare for taxpayers," Jan 7)? I can only think that the only reason would be to drive the fastest growing minority voting block into the welcome arms of the Democratic party for ages to come. Which is fine with me. But I think Delegate McDonough's xenophobic bullying against ethnic minorities should be pointed out during a time of economic distress, when a scapegoat is necessary.
NEWS
November 6, 1994
The Black Police Officers Association of Anne Arundel County has endorsed Democrat Theodore J. Sophocleus for county executive.In a two-paragraph letter sent Friday to Mr. Sophocleus' headquarters in the 100 block of Crain Highway, the Severn-based officers' organization cited the Democrat for his "balanced approach of economic realism, understanding of social needs, and the administration of principles of inclusion necessary to serve our county."The letter was signed by the organization's president, Officer Charles R. Ravenell, and its vice president, Officer Brian Fleming.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,sun reporter | January 19, 2007
Ethnic diversity will be an important factor when Howard County Executive Ken Ulman announces his choice to fill a vacant seat on the school board. "I've had a number of meetings with people that care that county government reflects the diversity of our community," Ulman said. "It is one of the factors that we are looking at. The biggest factor is appointing someone who believes in keeping our school system No. 1 in the state." Ulman said he has a "short list" of potential candidates, and he expects to make a decision by the end of this month.
NEWS
March 3, 1992
The American Psychological Association recently discovered what many have long recognized: Television does not accurately portray the real world. The medium remains the "vast wasteland" critics dubbed it back in the 1950s.The APA report, "Big World, Small Screen," reiterates much that was already known about the viewing audience. The average child watches television three hours a day and will have seen 8,000 murders and 100,000 violent crimes on television by adolescence. Low-income people watch television the most.
NEWS
October 22, 2006
Disabled students should be included I was thrilled to read the headline "Meetings work toward more inclusive county schools" regarding Carroll County's public schools. As a parent of a child with a disability, gratitude welled up that, finally, the public school system was reaching out to educate parents and truly include children with disabilities in a meaningful way in their schools. The story turned out to be about reaching out toward ethnic minorities. This is also a welcome sign of progress, though not the one I had anticipated.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,sun reporter | January 19, 2007
Ethnic diversity will be an important factor when Howard County Executive Ken Ulman announces his choice to fill a vacant seat on the school board. "I've had a number of meetings with people that care that county government reflects the diversity of our community," Ulman said. "It is one of the factors that we are looking at. The biggest factor is appointing someone who believes in keeping our school system No. 1 in the state." Ulman said he has a "short list" of potential candidates, and he expects to make a decision by the end of this month.
NEWS
October 22, 2006
Disabled students should be included I was thrilled to read the headline "Meetings work toward more inclusive county schools" regarding Carroll County's public schools. As a parent of a child with a disability, gratitude welled up that, finally, the public school system was reaching out to educate parents and truly include children with disabilities in a meaningful way in their schools. The story turned out to be about reaching out toward ethnic minorities. This is also a welcome sign of progress, though not the one I had anticipated.
NEWS
November 11, 2001
Public attorneys make bail system more just, and could save money The bail bond industry's recent attempts to divert attention from systemic bail reforms ignores fiscal realities ("Bail laws fight looms," Oct. 30). Research shows that providing a public defender at bail hearings more than doubles the likelihood that judges will release defendants charged with nonviolent offenses on personal recognizance, rather than requiring unaffordable bail. Reducing the number and duration of incarcerations would be a good thing for a state facing a gloomy economic forecast.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2001
Access Worldwide Communications Inc., a company that specializes in marketing services, said yesterday that it moved the headquarters and call center of its TelAc Teleservices Group from Arlington, Va., to Hyattsville in Prince George's County. The 24,000-square-foot headquarters and telemarketing center in Hyattsville employs 500. The move from Virginia to Maryland was completed Tuesday. "It was a pretty smooth transition," said Andrea Greenan, the company's director of investor relations.
NEWS
By N.Y. TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 29, 2000
A white immigration lawyer went on a shooting spree on the outskirts of Pittsburgh yesterday afternoon, killing five people, including a Jewish woman, two Asian men, one Indian and one black man and critically injuring a sixth, police officials said. The man, identified by the police as Richard Baumhammers, 34, was pulled over in his Jeep and arrested at 3: 30 p.m. in Ambridge, two hours after the police uncovered a 15-mile trail of death that ran through two shopping centers and crossed three townships.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 12, 1999
LANGLEY, Va. -- WANTED: Smart, clean-living college and graduate students fluent in non-Romance languages. Minority group members and Turkish and Iranian U.S. citizens are especially welcome. A taste for foreign intrigue is required. That's the Central Intelligence Agency's pitch for its biggest recruiting drive since the Cold War ended. And it's working even better than spymasters expected. Applications more than doubled to 39,000 in the fiscal year that ended Sept. 30. They're expected to double again next year, and the drive should continue up to four more years.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 18, 1999
SAN FRANCISCO -- For most of this century, the National Park Service has worked hard to preserve the country's natural resources and history. But for whom?Responding to criticism that its work force is mostly white and the vast majority of park visitors are too, the service held its first conference on diversity here.About 550 people from across the nation, many of them from community organizations representing blacks, Asians, Latinos and other ethnic minorities, gathered for a traditional blessing by an American Indian of the Pomo tribe before attending workshops last week with such titles as: "National Parks: Places of Isolation or Inclusivity?"
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff Correspondent | April 25, 1991
CHICAGO -- For many of Kuwait's hundreds of thousands of Palestinians and ethnic minorities, life after liberation has been just as oppressive -- sometimes more so -- than it was during the seven-month occupation by Iraqi soldiers, according to a U.S. doctor who examined two Palestinians a day after they were tortured by Kuwaitis.But when it comes to torture techniques, said Dr. Robert Kirschner, the Iraqi occupation forces were in a league by themselves for creative cruelty.Dr. Kirschner, the chief medical examiner for Cook County, Ill., and a world-renowned expert on identifying evidence of torture, shared those impressions after returning this month from a five-day stay in Kuwait.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 18, 1999
SAN FRANCISCO -- For most of this century, the National Park Service has worked hard to preserve the country's natural resources and history. But for whom?Responding to criticism that its work force is mostly white and the vast majority of park visitors are too, the service held its first conference on diversity here.About 550 people from across the nation, many of them from community organizations representing blacks, Asians, Latinos and other ethnic minorities, gathered for a traditional blessing by an American Indian of the Pomo tribe before attending workshops last week with such titles as: "National Parks: Places of Isolation or Inclusivity?"
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 15, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration set in motion yesterday changes in one of its premier affirmative action programs that would make it easier for white-owned firms to qualify for government contracts that have been reserved almost exclusively for minorities.The planned changes in the Small Business Administration program, announced yesterday, are part of the administration's continuing effort to modify federal affirmative action policies in the aftermath of a 1995 Supreme Court ruling that restricted the use of race as a consideration in awarding federal contracts.
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