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Ethnic Festivals

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NEWS
August 20, 1992
The 16th Jewish-American Festival will feature the usual impressive array of entertainers and gustatory delights. The event will also occupy its standard slot on the calendar, Labor Day weekend.But this year's festival will differ from its predecessors because of its location -- the parking lot of the Owings Mills Town Center mall. In fact, this marks the first time one of Baltimore's Showcase of Nations ethnic fests has been moved out of the city.At first blush, the festival organizers' decision to make the move seems simple enough.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | June 1, 2006
Warm summer weather ushers in the city's Showcase of Nations Ethnic Festivals. The 12-festival series kicks off tomorrow with the Polish Festival and wraps up with the Russian Festival in late October. Here's a rundown of each. The Polish Festival runs 4 p.m.-10 p.m. tomorrow, noon-10 p.m. Saturday and 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m. Sunday in Patterson Park, at South Linwood and Eastern avenues. See polka bands, browse crafts and eat traditional Polish foods. Admission is $2 tomorrow and $4 Saturday and Sunday.
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FEATURES
By Karen Harrop and Karen Harrop,Special to The Sun | June 8, 1994
June is here and in Baltimore that means the feast is about to begin. The summer-long parade of ethnic festivals is getting under way.From now through September, Baltimore will celebrate its rich mix of ethnic heritages with festivals that include traditional dress, cultural activities and food. Lots of food -- a lot of it carefully prepared much the way it was in the old country.The Showcase of Nations -- 12 ethnic festivals coordinated by the city -- kicks off this weekend with the Lithuanian festival, although there have been and will be other events organized individually in and around the city.
NEWS
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | May 24, 2006
With the arrival of immigrants and refugees from Central America, Africa and Asia in recent decades, Baltimore's traditional foodscape has ventured from the continent of Polish pierogi, Greek pastitsio and German schnitzel to those of Korean bul kogi, Mexican tamales and Nigerian fried yam. The changes are clear in area restaurants, groceries, food stands, farmers' markets and in the streets where competing cooking scents emanate enticingly from rowhouses...
NEWS
August 23, 1997
BEFORE THERE was Harborplace, Baltimore's ethnic festivals brought multitudes to Rash Field. It wasn't unusual to have a quarter-million people attend three-day affairs held by the Germans or Italians. As Harborplace became reality, events moved to Festival Hall until that building was disassembled to make room for the Convention Center's expansion.Now, much smaller festivals are held at various sites. The Italians this year moved their event to Dundalk. The city should ask them to come home.
NEWS
June 1, 1996
THIS WEEKEND KICKS OFF the Baltimore area's season of ethnic festivals. People of Polish ancestry gather around the Pulaski Monument in Patterson Park; Lithuanians celebrate at the Catonsville Armory. By the time the series ends in late September with the Ukrainian festival, more than a dozen ethnic festivals will have highlighted the diversity of the Baltimore region's roots.Ethnic festivals have existed here for more than 200 years. Except that in the early days they were just an ordinary part of the social life of a wide variety of immigrant communities.
NEWS
August 22, 1998
LAST WEEKEND illustrated what an exciting mosaic Baltimore is: The Stone Soul picnic brought thousands of African-American revelers to Druid Hill Park, the 98th German Festival took place in Carroll Park and India Day was celebrated at Market Place.Such a scattering of crowd events throughout the city is encouraging. This year's AFRAM festival underscored that festivals do not need to be downtown to succeed. Its new West Baltimore location around Mondawmin Mall seemed to make everyone happy.
NEWS
By Karen Zeiler | June 11, 1993
TWO ETHNIC FESTIVALS:TWO ETHNIC FESTIVALS: Lithuanians will be celebrating at Festival Hall and Greeks at St. Nicholas Church in Highlandtown this weekend. Both groups invite you to join in. * At Festival Hall, the city's Lithuanians will be feeding folks things like dazra, (spiced sausage served with sauerkraut), potato pancakes and traditional Lithuanian smoked chicken -- but leave some room for krustai, which is fried dough sprinkled with powdered sugar. And check out the 500-piece miniature display of the Battle of Tannenberg -- where Vytautas, Lithuania's war hero, defeated the Teutonic Knights in 1410.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane and David Michael Ettlin and Gregory P. Kane and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writers | October 22, 1993
Baltimore's Festival Hall, where countless thousands of people have celebrated the American melting pot during eight years of ethnic fetes, will be demolished rather than moved to make way for the $151 million Convention Center expansion.The building was designed with the idea of eventually dismantling and moving it from the block bounded by Howard, Camden, Sharp and Conway streets, but consultants for the Baltimore Development Corp. say that option is too costly."The existing building cannot be dismantled and relocated elsewhere except at great expense," said Michael Seipp, executive vice president of BEDCO.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUN STAFF | September 19, 2002
Margaret Cho at the Improv Her network television show, All-American Girl, lasted only briefly (1994-95), but it gave stand-up comedian Margaret Cho wide public exposure and gained her many new fans -- fans who then followed as she resumed her career as one of the nation's few Korean-American comedy stars. She was disappointed, of course, that the sitcom bombed, but says in her Web site bio that it "was a good experience as far as finding myself, knowing who I was and what direction I wanted to take with my comedy."
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUN STAFF | September 19, 2002
Margaret Cho at the Improv Her network television show, All-American Girl, lasted only briefly (1994-95), but it gave stand-up comedian Margaret Cho wide public exposure and gained her many new fans -- fans who then followed as she resumed her career as one of the nation's few Korean-American comedy stars. She was disappointed, of course, that the sitcom bombed, but says in her Web site bio that it "was a good experience as far as finding myself, knowing who I was and what direction I wanted to take with my comedy."
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 8, 1999
WE'RE SUPPOSED to have hope, in spite of it all. Howard Street merchant shot Friday night on the way to his parked car. Five women, including a grandmother, fatally shot Sunday night inside a rowhouse in Belair-Edison, their sprawled bodies inscribing some "message" drug dealers wanted to send to rivals. The anchorwoman on the "Today" show tells the nation all about bloody Baltimore bright and early Monday morning. And the same morning in Northeast Baltimore some kids find the body of another victim, a man with $500 in his pocket and a bullet hole in his head, on their way to elementary school.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff | September 16, 1999
When Gerry Farrelly left Ireland for America 25 years ago, he knew things would be vastly different. He was raised on a family farm near the city of Oldcastle, which is about 70 miles northwest of Dublin.Ed McBride left Ireland for America more than 40 years ago, and he also knew things would be vastly different. He grew up in the city of Derry.However, of all the culture clashes the two Irish immigrants faced in Baltimore, both emphatically state that their biggest adjustment wasn't to the people, nor to the fast-paced city life, nor to the diversity.
NEWS
August 22, 1998
LAST WEEKEND illustrated what an exciting mosaic Baltimore is: The Stone Soul picnic brought thousands of African-American revelers to Druid Hill Park, the 98th German Festival took place in Carroll Park and India Day was celebrated at Market Place.Such a scattering of crowd events throughout the city is encouraging. This year's AFRAM festival underscored that festivals do not need to be downtown to succeed. Its new West Baltimore location around Mondawmin Mall seemed to make everyone happy.
NEWS
August 23, 1997
BEFORE THERE was Harborplace, Baltimore's ethnic festivals brought multitudes to Rash Field. It wasn't unusual to have a quarter-million people attend three-day affairs held by the Germans or Italians. As Harborplace became reality, events moved to Festival Hall until that building was disassembled to make room for the Convention Center's expansion.Now, much smaller festivals are held at various sites. The Italians this year moved their event to Dundalk. The city should ask them to come home.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 25, 1997
I see where the Italian Festival is back after a one-year hiatus. But don't look for it at Rash Field, or Patterson Park. Don't even look for it in the city they call Baltimore. It's being held in Dundalk, at Heritage Park, starting today and running through Sunday.This marks the first time the festival will be held outside the city. It should be noted that, once upon a time, this was a major event that brought thousands of people to that big waterfront corner known as the Inner Harbor.The first festival in 1973 attracted about 150,000 lovers of calzones and cannoli, though it was a logistical nightmare for the organizers.
NEWS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,Special to The Sun | April 3, 1994
The town of Ocean City has filled its calendar this year with an assortment of events to warm up winter-weary vacation planners as they look forward to the summer months ahead.Summer in Ocean City officially gets under way May 5 with a four-day Springfest celebration on the beach, which features sky diving, stunt kite flying, boat, car and truck shows, food and entertainment under big-top tents at the inlet.The season winds down in the fall with Sunfest, scheduled from Sept. 22-25. In between, the months will be filled with parades, ethnic festivals, Fourth of July celebrations, fishing tournaments and a lifeguard skills competition.
NEWS
August 29, 1991
Asbestos delays unfair to victimsLaura Lippman's Aug. 13 article "No sign yet of asbestos awards" illustrates a growing problem which affects asbestos victims in Baltimore and throughout the country.We have a clear case of corporations flagrantly ignoring and suppressing facts about the destruction by asbestos of millions of people's health and lives. The asbestos victims are the legal issue, yet the legal system continues "to process" around them for the benefit of the wrongdoers, the asbestos industry.
NEWS
June 1, 1996
THIS WEEKEND KICKS OFF the Baltimore area's season of ethnic festivals. People of Polish ancestry gather around the Pulaski Monument in Patterson Park; Lithuanians celebrate at the Catonsville Armory. By the time the series ends in late September with the Ukrainian festival, more than a dozen ethnic festivals will have highlighted the diversity of the Baltimore region's roots.Ethnic festivals have existed here for more than 200 years. Except that in the early days they were just an ordinary part of the social life of a wide variety of immigrant communities.
FEATURES
By Karen Harrop and Karen Harrop,Special to The Sun | June 8, 1994
June is here and in Baltimore that means the feast is about to begin. The summer-long parade of ethnic festivals is getting under way.From now through September, Baltimore will celebrate its rich mix of ethnic heritages with festivals that include traditional dress, cultural activities and food. Lots of food -- a lot of it carefully prepared much the way it was in the old country.The Showcase of Nations -- 12 ethnic festivals coordinated by the city -- kicks off this weekend with the Lithuanian festival, although there have been and will be other events organized individually in and around the city.
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