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NEWS
January 2, 1998
WHILE much of former Yugoslavia seems quiet as long as foreign troops patrol, the ethnic question in Kosovo province of Serbia was never settled. The demonstration of ethnic Albanian students demanding places back at the university in the provincial capital of Pristina, from which they were expelled in 1989, was suppressed by Serbian riot police Tuesday. It served as reminder that this piece of the puzzle was not even addressed in the Dayton peace conference.Kosovo is a province, formerly autonomous, of Serbia.
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NEWS
November 16, 2004
Hungarian assembly rejects plan to keep troops in Iraq longer BUDAPEST, Hungary - The Hungarian parliament rejected yesterday a government proposal to extend the stay of 300 non-combat troops in Iraq by three months until March 31 next year. The proposal needed to be approved by two-thirds of the 386 deputies, but only 191 voted in favor and 159 against. Approval of the attempt to extend the deployment had been considered unlikely. The main opposition party said an extension was possible only if the troops were given U.N. backing.
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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 17, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Less than a year after ejecting Serb troops from Kosovo, NATO forces are increasingly at odds with those they came to save: the ethnic Albanians. With the approach of spring -- the favored killing time in the Balkans -- hundreds of ethnic Albanians are crossing from the allied-occupied province of Kosovo into Serbia proper, attacking the villages of their historic enemy and threatening the region's tenuous peace. The Pentagon plans to send unmanned surveillance drones to pinpoint and perhaps prevent infiltration by the ethnic Albanians.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Fleishman and Zoran Cirjakovic and Jeffrey Fleishman and Zoran Cirjakovic,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 20, 2004
BELGRADE, Serbia and Montenegro - The turmoil in Kosovo eased yesterday as NATO, determined to prevent nationalist strife from again destabilizing the Balkans, deployed more troops into villages marred by gunfire and streaked with smoke rising from Serbian homes set ablaze by ethnic Albanian mobs. With its credibility in jeopardy after three days of violence, the alliance became more aggressive in quelling uprisings, especially in the ethnically divided city of Kosovska Mitrovica. Germany and France announced that they were sending 1,000 additional peacekeepers to Kosovo.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 13, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Thousands of land mines threaten to delay the refugees' return to Kosovo or, in some cases, injure or maim civilians. And NATO peacekeepers are unlikely to be able to prevent violence as Albanians retaliate for treatment by Serbs.Warning of a devastated and dangerous landscape after fierce fighting and 11 weeks of airstrikes, officials are telling refugees not to plan to return for at least two weeks after Serbian forces withdraw and an international security force has entered the province.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 20, 1998
ORAHOVAC, Yugoslavia -- In what could be the beginning of a significant new phase of the fighting in the Serbian province of Kosovo, ethnic Albanian separatists said yesterday that they had taken Orahovac, their first city, and that they would use their newly acquired weapons to keep it.Serbian forces counterattacked yesterday afternoon, but the separatist forces seemed confident and continued heavy firing against what they said were the remaining four...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 31, 1999
BLACE, Macedonia -- The flow of refugees from Kosovo is overwhelming neighboring countries, leading to long delays at the borders and, in some cases, refugees being ordered to turn back.Ethnic Albanian refugees who fled Kosovo for Albania have been spilling into Macedonia, where border officials have turned them away, and there were reports yesterday that a trainload of people coming from Kosovo was also sent back.Deputy Prime Minister Radmila Kiprijanova, speaking at a news conference in Skopje, the capital, said that the country could not cope with more refugees.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 8, 1999
PRISTINA, Yugoslavia -- While others watched Saturday's televised opening of Kosovo's peace talks, a dark-haired 18-year-old named Vlora Humoli left her family's apartment to buy a cup of sugar.She never came back.Humoli was one of three people killed when a bomb destroyed a tiny shop in an ethnic Albanian neighborhood. The blast echoed through this provincial capital as French President Jacques Chirac addressed the would-be peacemakers at a chateau outside Paris.The explosion served as a reminder that the conflict that has been waged in the countryside between Serbian security forces and rebel Kosovo Liberation Army guerrillas could now be seeping into once-peaceful Pristina.
NEWS
By Paul Watson and Paul Watson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 1, 1999
PRISTINA, Yugoslavia -- Herded by Yugoslav soldiers ordering them to keep moving, a grim column of ethnic Albanians was marched to Pristina's railway station yesterday and loaded on trains bound for the Macedonian border.After clearing out much of the ethnic Albanian majority from vast swaths of Kosovo's countryside, it appears that Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic is setting his sights on the province's capital.At least 7,000 men, women and children, most with no baggage or possessions, streamed silently through the capital's center late yesterday afternoon to the train station.
NEWS
By NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | June 25, 1999
NEW YORK -- Haxhi Dervisholli lost a foot to a Serbian mortar. Isa Kodra lost his innocence.Both were among several dozen New York City volunteers who went to fight for Kosovo as part of the Atlantic Brigade.Neither has regrets."People I know feel sorry for me," said Dervisholli, 29, holding the stump where his right foot used to be. "But I feel proud of what I did."Kodra was a 17-year-old from Brooklyn when he left two months ago to fight the Serbs. He returned home a battle-hardened 18-year-old man with Serbian blood on his uniform and horrific tales from his time fighting with the Kosovo Liberation Army.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 21, 2001
MACEDONIA-KOSOVO BORDER -- At dusk, leaf and branch fade to gray high in the rugged mountains on the border between Macedonia and Kosovo. Invisible in the bushes, three U.S. soldiers in camouflage crouch, their weapons cocked; a hundred feet away, three more soldiers take the same position. The six surround a narrow clearing that looks like any other opening in the Kosovo woods. It is anything but. The trail, one of many, leads straight over the border south into Macedonia. For months, it has been a key arms smuggling route for ethnic Albanian rebels, who call themselves the National Liberation Army.
NEWS
July 9, 2001
Ethnic Albanians object to proposal for Macedonia peace SKOPJE, Macedonia -- Ethnic Albanian politicians expressed serious objections yesterday to a new Western-backed peace plan for Macedonia. Their comments came on the eve of talks to help end an ethnic Albanian insurgency that has threatened to develop into civil war. The ethnic Albanian leaders did not reject the draft outright, which is meant to reconcile Macedonia's majority Slavs and minority ethnic Albanians. The parties meet today to negotiate.
TOPIC
By George Gedda | July 8, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Slobodan Milosevic had his hand in the turmoil in Slovenia, Bosnia, Croatia and Kosovo over the past decade. At least he can't be blamed for the Balkan strife in Macedonia, which ended with Thursday's cease-fire. Unlike the earlier conflicts, in which many believe Serbia's Milosevic was calling the shots, there was no sinister face attached to the ethnic Albanian uprising in in Macedonia. Likewise, there is no consensus as to how deeply involved the United States should be. Most Americans would have trouble finding the Vermont-sized country of 2 million on a map. American ties to the country -- political, economic and ethnic -- are thin at best.
NEWS
By Michael O'Hanlon and Micah Zenko | April 26, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Is the latest Balkans crisis now over? Macedonia's government achieved some battlefield success against ethnic Albanian rebels in late March. If it now offers greater political rights to its ethnic Albanian minority, the looming civil war in that country may well be defused. The ethnic Albanian rebels have not been militarily defeated. They have simply undertaken a tactical retreat, probably postponing their real fight for the summer, as they had originally planned. Perhaps they will give up the fight if Macedonian Albanians are granted better rights.
NEWS
By Gregory Michaelidis | March 28, 2001
TO SAY THE violence in Macedonia has caught people off-guard is an understatement. The young Macedonian republic of 2.1 million people has been touted as a model for its peaceful disengagement from Yugoslavia and has been enjoying warm relations with its neighbors and an improved economy. Yet tension between Macedonian Slavs and the estimated 400,000 ethnic Albanians have proved the biggest challenge to stability. Ethnic Albanians, who rightfully complain of their treatment as second-class citizens, hold five ministries in Macedonia's government and will soon begin construction of a private Albanian-language university.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Tom Bowman and Jay Hancock and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 7, 2000
WASHINGTON - Slobodan Milosevic's fall is a huge step forward for peace, democracy and economic growth in Yugoslavia, but it doesn't solve the Western democracies' diplomatic headaches in the Balkans, and in some ways makes them more difficult, diplomats and regional specialists said yesterday. "This changes the landscape in the Balkans and certainly in the former Yugoslavia," but it also "presents a number of challenges," a senior administration official who spoke on condition of anonymity said yesterday.
NEWS
By T. CHRISTIAN MILLER AND ANN M. SIMMONS and T. CHRISTIAN MILLER AND ANN M. SIMMONS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 29, 1999
After three years of monitoring food supplies at a remote refugee camp in Somalia, one of her first crises in Macedonia was an urgent request from a medical team. A diabetic refugee had just crossed the border. Could she provide a special diet?She could not believe what she was hearing, much less that she was able to fulfill the request."In Africa, we don't have special food or diets. There are no diabetics in the camps," she says. "They just die."Food, shelter, medical care, recreational facilities -- all are more abundantly available for the ethnic Albanian refugees than for their counterparts in African camps.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 10, 1998
LONDON -- Using a new arms embargo and an ultimatum, the United States and five other nations moved yesterday to blunt Serbia's crackdown against ethnic Albanians in Kosovo, where dozens of deaths have imperiled the peace in the often volatile Balkan region.The governments also gave Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic a 10-day deadline to withdraw special police units from Kosovo and open talks with moderate Albanians in the province. If Milosevic does not comply, Serbia faces additional sanctions from the United States, Britain, France, Germany, Italy and Russia.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 17, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Less than a year after ejecting Serb troops from Kosovo, NATO forces are increasingly at odds with those they came to save: the ethnic Albanians. With the approach of spring -- the favored killing time in the Balkans -- hundreds of ethnic Albanians are crossing from the allied-occupied province of Kosovo into Serbia proper, attacking the villages of their historic enemy and threatening the region's tenuous peace. The Pentagon plans to send unmanned surveillance drones to pinpoint and perhaps prevent infiltration by the ethnic Albanians.
NEWS
February 6, 2000
French peacekeepers, ethnic Albanians clash in Kosovo, injuring 41 KOSOVSKA MITROVICA, Yugoslavia -- French peacekeepers clashed with ethnic Albanians in northwestern Kosovo yesterday, as the peacekeepers used clubs and tear gas to force back hundreds who tried to push their way across a bridge to the Serbian-controlled side of a divided town. It was the second day of confrontations between the soldiers and ethnic Albanians in Kosovska Mitrovica, and the fourth day of violence since a rocket attack on a United Nations bus killed two elderly Serbs.
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