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By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | March 17, 1994
Students at Northwestern High School, a nearly all-black school in a heavily Jewish corner of Baltimore, have heard much about tensions between blacks and Jews.But they viewed the matter yesterday from a new angle: They met three teen-agers who are both black and Jewish.The visitors -- Gad Kebede, 19; Batsheva Mekonen, 18, and Nurit Tezazo, 16 -- are Ethiopian-Israelis. Their families conserved their Jewish religion for more than 2,500 years in a remote area of Ethiopia before fleeing in the early 1980s to escape war and famine.
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NEWS
April 3, 1999
Sheldon E. Kopp, 70, a psychologist and author best known for his 1972 book "If You Meet a Buddha on the Road, Kill Him," died of cardiac arrhythmia and pneumonia Monday in Washington.Robert Flint Chandler Jr., 91, a retired agronomist with the Rockefeller Foundation and a leader in the fight against hunger in Asia, died March 23 in Eustis, Fla. He joined the foundation staff in 1954 and soon afterward received worldwide recognition as a field commander in the "Green Revolution" that helped to feed poor countries.
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FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 25, 1994
The impulse behind "Faith and Survival: Ethiopian Jewish Life 1983-1992" cannot be faulted, but the show as mounted at Goucher can.At one time, there may have been as many as 1 million Ethiopian Jews, but today their numbers have dwindled to the tens of thousands and their way of life is threatened by the unrest in their country.During the 1980s and early 1990s, Peggy Heilbronn Myers, an art history graduate of Goucher and a well-known classical ballet photographer, documented the lives of the Ethiopian Jews on visits to their country with her husband, who was working as a doctor.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF Reporter Joshua Brilliant contributed to this article | July 29, 1996
JERUSALEM -- Israel's national blood bank acted properly when it discarded blood donated by Ethiopian Jews because of concerns about the AIDS virus, a government-appointed panel concluded yesterday.The policy by the Magen David Adom, Israel's equivalent of the Red Cross, enraged members of Israel's Ethiopian community, who attributed the blood dumping to racism. In January, after reports in the Israeli media about the blood dumping, thousands of Ethiopian Jews demonstrated outside the prime minister's office.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF Reporter Joshua Brilliant contributed to this article | July 29, 1996
JERUSALEM -- Israel's national blood bank acted properly when it discarded blood donated by Ethiopian Jews because of concerns about the AIDS virus, a government-appointed panel concluded yesterday.The policy by the Magen David Adom, Israel's equivalent of the Red Cross, enraged members of Israel's Ethiopian community, who attributed the blood dumping to racism. In January, after reports in the Israeli media about the blood dumping, thousands of Ethiopian Jews demonstrated outside the prime minister's office.
NEWS
May 28, 1991
Operation Solomon, the rescue of 14,087 Ethiopian Jews and their transport to Israel within a period of 33 hours as a vicious civil war raged all around them, is about as close to a modern-day miracle as this cynical world can countenance. Now, almost complete, is an exodus that reconfirms Israel's mission as a refuge for world Jewry wherever it is threatened.The Ethiopian Jews trace their origins to the progeny of King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba, who are said to have journeyed to Africa around the time of the building of the First Temple.
NEWS
April 3, 1999
Sheldon E. Kopp, 70, a psychologist and author best known for his 1972 book "If You Meet a Buddha on the Road, Kill Him," died of cardiac arrhythmia and pneumonia Monday in Washington.Robert Flint Chandler Jr., 91, a retired agronomist with the Rockefeller Foundation and a leader in the fight against hunger in Asia, died March 23 in Eustis, Fla. He joined the foundation staff in 1954 and soon afterward received worldwide recognition as a field commander in the "Green Revolution" that helped to feed poor countries.
NEWS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | December 31, 1994
Barbara Ribakove Gordon's silver Star of David pendant reminded her of the miracles.In 1991, she helped in the airlift of Ethiopian Jews to Israel. Given only two days to complete the task by the Ethiopian government, 14,500 Ethiopian Jews fled refugee camps for the Promised Land. Ms. Gordon was with some of them on the last plane out."It was just one miracle after another," she said.Ms. Gordon said she needs another miracle if she intends to recover her pendant, which was stolen earlier this month after the closing of the "The Jews of Ethiopia" exhibit at the Eubie Blake Gallery at the Brokerage.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | May 25, 1991
JERUSALEM -- If Israel succeeds in carrying out an emergency airlift of Ethiopian Jews, it will have belatedly completed an operation that began amid great secrecy in 1984 but broke down when its existence became public knowledge.That first, secret airlift, beginning in November 1984, involved about 7,000 Ethiopian Jews who treked by foot to a transit camp in Sudan before being secretly flown to Israel, and initially to a heartfelt welcome.To Israel's consternation, Sudan halted the operation after Israeli officials disclosed its existence, embarrassing Ethiopia as well.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 29, 1996
JERUSALEM -- Denouncing as racist an Israeli government policy of destroying blood donated by Ethiopian Jews, thousands of Ethiopians clashed with police outside the prime minister's office during an angry demonstration yesterday.Police fired water cannons, rubber bullets, percussion grenades and tear gas at protesters, and several Ethiopians reported being beaten by club-wielding riot police. Army Radio reported that 62 people were injured, 41 of them police officers.Police spokesman Eric Bar-Chen said police used force only after demonstrators broke through fences and attacked the building where Prime Minister Shimon Peres was holding the weekly Cabinet meeting.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 29, 1996
JERUSALEM -- Denouncing as racist an Israeli government policy of destroying blood donated by Ethiopian Jews, thousands of Ethiopians clashed with police outside the prime minister's office during an angry demonstration yesterday.Police fired water cannons, rubber bullets, percussion grenades and tear gas at protesters, and several Ethiopians reported being beaten by club-wielding riot police. Army Radio reported that 62 people were injured, 41 of them police officers.Police spokesman Eric Bar-Chen said police used force only after demonstrators broke through fences and attacked the building where Prime Minister Shimon Peres was holding the weekly Cabinet meeting.
NEWS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | December 31, 1994
Barbara Ribakove Gordon's silver Star of David pendant reminded her of the miracles.In 1991, she helped in the airlift of Ethiopian Jews to Israel. Given only two days to complete the task by the Ethiopian government, 14,500 Ethiopian Jews fled refugee camps for the Promised Land. Ms. Gordon was with some of them on the last plane out."It was just one miracle after another," she said.Ms. Gordon said she needs another miracle if she intends to recover her pendant, which was stolen earlier this month after the closing of the "The Jews of Ethiopia" exhibit at the Eubie Blake Gallery at the Brokerage.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | March 17, 1994
Students at Northwestern High School, a nearly all-black school in a heavily Jewish corner of Baltimore, have heard much about tensions between blacks and Jews.But they viewed the matter yesterday from a new angle: They met three teen-agers who are both black and Jewish.The visitors -- Gad Kebede, 19; Batsheva Mekonen, 18, and Nurit Tezazo, 16 -- are Ethiopian-Israelis. Their families conserved their Jewish religion for more than 2,500 years in a remote area of Ethiopia before fleeing in the early 1980s to escape war and famine.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 25, 1994
The impulse behind "Faith and Survival: Ethiopian Jewish Life 1983-1992" cannot be faulted, but the show as mounted at Goucher can.At one time, there may have been as many as 1 million Ethiopian Jews, but today their numbers have dwindled to the tens of thousands and their way of life is threatened by the unrest in their country.During the 1980s and early 1990s, Peggy Heilbronn Myers, an art history graduate of Goucher and a well-known classical ballet photographer, documented the lives of the Ethiopian Jews on visits to their country with her husband, who was working as a doctor.
FEATURES
By Dallas Morning News | November 17, 1992
Dr. Ruth Westheimer still likes sex. But the 68-year-old celebrity sex therapist is tackling another subject that is vast in its potential for controversy: religion.She combined the two for a recent talk in Dallas on "Sex in the Jewish Tradition," part of the Jewish Community Center's Jewish Book Fair. She plans to write a book about the same subject."Being Jewish and being steeped in the Jewish tradition is helping my sex therapy," she said. "In the Talmud, it says a lesson taught with humor is a lesson retained.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | July 30, 1991
Side by side, they prayed for a new order and got in the groove to agospel hymn. Some burst into cheers. A few wiped away tears.In an emotional ceremony, more than 400 blacks and Jews gathered at an Annapolis synagogue Sunday night to celebrate the liberation of Ethiopian Jews.The event marked the birth of a new alliance between the county'sblack and Jewish communities, the African American-Jewish Coalition of Anne Arundel County.Ministers and rabbis called for renewing ties to fight prejudice and persecution.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | May 27, 1991
JERUSALEM -- By allowing 14,000 Jews to be evacuated by air to Israel, Ethiopia's beleaguered government sought to protect itself from rebel forces nearing the capital and win United States support at peace talks in London.As outlined by senior Israeli officials, the 33-hour airlift of Ethiopian Jews became possible only when Ethiopian leaders determined that their own survival was at stake.After trying for months to trade Jews for Israeli arms, the Ethiopian government changed tactics in an attempt to preserve itself, the officials said.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 25, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A massive airlift was under way last night to transport 18,000 Ethiopian Jews from their war-torn nation to resettlement in Israel, where they are all expected to arrive within the next day or so, U.S. officials said.The rescue mission, which began about 7 a.m. EDT yesterday, was being undertaken by the Israeli government with the cooperation of Ethiopian authorities after direct intercession Wednesday by President Bush, the White House said.El Al commercial jets and Ethiopian passenger aircraft began landing at Tel Aviv's Ben Gurion Airport about midday, jammed with passengers who had little or no luggage in order to get the maximum number aboard for the 3 1/2 -hour journey from the Horn of Africa.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 7, 1991
JERUSALEM -- Less than two weeks after the lightning airlift of Ethiopian Jews moved Israelis to national celebration, this country is grappling with a new twist in the debate that could determine the fate of several thousand Ethiopians left behind.The question: Are they real Jews?When the last Israeli aircraft in "Operation Solomon" took off from Addis Ababa as Ethiopian rebels converged on the capital, 169 Ethiopian Jews were left behind because they missed the plane. An additional 3,000 didn't make it because they were Christian converts who claim Jewish origin.
NEWS
June 5, 1991
Move to AdelphiEditor: It has been six months or more since the University of Maryland Board of Regents' office was quietly moved from Baltimore to Adelphi. To date, no public action nor notice has been made regarding the move. To many it was a strange and unfortunate move. The regents' office has always been located in Baltimore, where the University of Maryland was founded back in 1907.The details regarding just how and why the move was made are extremely sketchy. The reason offered for the move, by people who should know, was that there was an excess of employees on the UMAB campus.
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