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NEWS
May 10, 2012
Now there are six councilmen known to have taken football game tickets from developers, along with Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, who says the tickets he got were "for his wife" ("Councilman took football tickets from developer," May 9). According to Don Mohler, Mr. Kamenetz' chief of staff, the county plans to update its ethics law soon to comply with state guidelines. Will it also comply with county laws it has ignored, such as its refusal to comply with zoning laws in one neighborhood and its refusal to enforce the posted street signs, which has put the lives of residents at risk?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2013
The members of Baltimore's ethics board wrote an email to Councilman James Kraft Friday chastising him for comments made in The Sun and the City Paper regarding a dispute between the board and members of the council over a piece of ethics leglsiation.  At issue is legislation - sought by Council President  Bernard C. "Jack" Young   - that would loosen conflict-of-interest restrictions that have sometimes prevented City Council members from...
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2012
Baltimore County's public ethics law falls short of Maryland standards because it allows elected leaders to accept tickets to sporting events from people who do business with the county, state officials said Friday. The county has described its ethics laws - overhauled late last year - as among the toughest in the Maryland. But the State Ethics Commission has warned Baltimore County that it is not in compliance with a 2010 law that requires local ethics laws to be at least as strong as those state lawmakers must follow.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake says she will neither sign nor veto legislation to loosen conflict-of-interest restrictions that have sometimes prevented City Council members from voting on bills. The legislation - sought by Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young - has been approved by the council, and it is expected to become law without the mayor's signature. The bill, sponsored by Young, would lift some ethics restrictions to allow him to vote on matters involving city agencies where his family members work.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | September 19, 1994
A revision of the county's public ethics law that spells out the investigative powers of the Ethics Commission will come before the County Council for a public hearing tonight.Reworking the law was designated as one of the first tasks for the seven-member commission, created by charter amendment in the November 1992 election. Formerly, ethics issues were handled by the county attorney, who is appointed by the county executive.The law will detail how the commission will investigate complaints against county employees and how it will conduct hearings.
NEWS
October 21, 1990
Some citizens are upset by the fact that County Councilman John D. Schafer, D-District C, voted against a motion to appeal a judge's decision that will allow Maryland Reclamation Associates Inc. to seek a state permit for a proposed rubble fill.Schafer's son, Richard Schafer of Churchville, is president of Maryland Reclamation. Schafer abstained from two previous council votes -- one in November and one in May -- on matters related to Maryland Reclamation's proposal for a rubble fill.Lester H. Feinberg, the council's attorney, said, "I gave Schafer an opinion in November that he could vote without violating the ethics law because the language of the law dealt with dependent children."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2001
Dozens of Maryland's most-prominent lobbyists went to school yesterday, trooping to the State House for a course in Ethics 101. Advocates for the poor joined wily defenders of special interests at two-hour sessions during which state Ethics Commission officials explained the lobbyist ethics law passed this year. The course showed that the legislation has been remarkably successful in bringing do-gooders and "black hats" to a consensus: The law stinks. Lobbyists called it complicated, confusing and fraught with unanticipated consequences.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | October 19, 2008
M. Peter Moser, a Baltimore attorney who became a prominent advocate of ethics law, died of cancer Friday at his home at The Towers at Harbor Court condominium downtown. He was 80. Mr. Moser was born in Baltimore and attended McDonogh School from the first grade until he graduated just before his 17th birthday, completing high school in 2 1/2 years. He attended The Citadel, graduating with honors from the South Carolina military college in 2 1/2 years, and then went to Harvard Law School, receiving his degree at age 22. When he took the Maryland bar exam, he scored the second-highest grade that year.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1998
In the wake of the investigation and expulsion of former Sen. Larry Young, the General Assembly's presiding officers are launching a major review of Maryland's ethics law.Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. said yesterday they will introduce legislation setting up a 15-member commission to study the law and propose changes for the Assembly to consider next year.While prompted by the Young case, Miller and Taylor said the study is also needed to ensure that the law, some of which dates back 19 years, reflects the increasing pressure legislators are feeling from special interests.
NEWS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | September 29, 1992
Maryland Insurance Commissioner John A. Donaho has accepted free sky-box tickets to Orioles games from at least two insurance companies, in violation of a state law that bans regulators from accepting gifts from the organizations they oversee.But the attorney general's office said yesterday that Mr. Donaho did not realize his actions were illegal because the state sent him a memo on dos and don'ts that mistakenly implied he could accept tickets to sporting events.Mr. Donaho, who is supposed to oversee the financial safety of insurers operating in the state, has criticized one of his ballpark hosts, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland, in recent weeks for spending too much money on image enhancements such as sponsorship of the U.S. Olympic team and its $75,000- a-year sky box at Camden Yard.
NEWS
November 7, 2012
I suggest that Comptroller Joan Pratt, City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake have a talk with their appointed members on the Ethics Board and ask them to vote for termination of Avery Aisenstark for his disregard of the requirements of his office that he is charged to uphold which includes the avoidance of "appearance of a conflict of interest. " ("City ethics director does legal work on county zoning battle," Nov. 1) The city ethics law is intended "[t]
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2012
Elected officials in Baltimore County will no longer be allowed to take sports tickets as gifts from lobbyists or people who do business with the county. The County Council on Monday unanimously approved revisions to the county's ethics law to bring the rules in line with state standards, including the ban on tickets. Other revisions dealt with issues including when lobbyists must report the gifts they give to public officials. Last year, the council revamped the local ethics law under a measure proposed by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz.
NEWS
May 10, 2012
Now there are six councilmen known to have taken football game tickets from developers, along with Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, who says the tickets he got were "for his wife" ("Councilman took football tickets from developer," May 9). According to Don Mohler, Mr. Kamenetz' chief of staff, the county plans to update its ethics law soon to comply with state guidelines. Will it also comply with county laws it has ignored, such as its refusal to comply with zoning laws in one neighborhood and its refusal to enforce the posted street signs, which has put the lives of residents at risk?
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Baltimore County Councilman Todd Huff says he accepted football tickets from a developer that were not reported on his annual financial disclosure form. The county's ethics law does not require elected officials to disclose whether they've accepted sports tickets as gifts, but five of the council's seven members — as well as County Executive Kevin Kamenetz — reported that they had done so last year. The county has continued to allow the practice, despite the fact that the state requires it to be banned.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and some County Council members accepted thousands of dollars' worth of tickets to sporting events from developers and others last year, a practice the county has continued to allow in violation of state ethics standards. The county overhauled its ethics law late last year under legislation introduced by Kamenetz but did not bar elected officials from taking sports tickets from people who do business with the county. The State Ethics Commission decided in February that the county's reform effort had fallen short.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2012
Baltimore County's public ethics law falls short of Maryland standards because it allows elected leaders to accept tickets to sporting events from people who do business with the county, state officials said Friday. The county has described its ethics laws - overhauled late last year - as among the toughest in the Maryland. But the State Ethics Commission has warned Baltimore County that it is not in compliance with a 2010 law that requires local ethics laws to be at least as strong as those state lawmakers must follow.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2003
Anne Arundel County officials said last night that they will tighten some proposed changes to the county ethics law that had been criticized as too lax. But opponents of the proposed changes said they are still not satisfied, and the County Council put off further discussion until next month. "We're only getting started," said James Browning, executive director of Common Cause/Maryland, a government watchdog group that is against many of the proposed changes. The changes were brought before the council last month by County Executive Janet S. Owens.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | July 7, 1996
In his campaign for a top position with a powerful national lobbying group, Howard County Councilman C. Vernon Gray is soliciting $1,000 donations from dozens of state and national companies -- a move that tests the limits of the county's ethics law.In letters signed by corporate supporters and obtained by The Sun, Gray has sought money from about 50 companies, assuring each that the contributions need not be reported under state election laws.Among the $1,000 donors, according to Gray, is Comcast Cablevision, the county's largest cable provider with 52,000 subscribers.
NEWS
February 17, 2012
I enjoyed your article about the gifts given to Baltimore's elected officials by people the city does business with ("Tickets and city ethics law," Feb. 12). Here's my question: How is it not raising major red flags that the city's second most powerful elected official conducts himself in this manner? City Council PresidentBernard C. "Jack" Youngobviously knows what the rules are. He's been in the game long enough. Yet "oral approval" and "cash" (with no receipt) are obvious causes for concern in terms of the excuses and explanations he has provided.
NEWS
January 6, 2012
Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller has named a special committee to review that state's ethics laws that apply to legislators and other state and local officials and make recommendations for reforms that could be voted on as early as this year. Miller announced Friday that he has appointed Sen. Jamie Raskin, a persistent ethics advocate, to chair the seven-member panel. "As law school professor and constututional law expert, Senator Raskin is uniquely qualified (to) lead this committee and I look forward very much to his recommendations.
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