Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEthics Bill
IN THE NEWS

Ethics Bill

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | March 22, 2012
Maryland's Senate gave preliminary approval Thursday to legislation that would require the state to put lawmakers' ethics forms online.  The legislation was supported by watchdog group Common Cause in the wake of a federal corruption trial that starred Sen. Ulysses S. Currie, a Prince George's County Democrat. Currie was found not guilty of bribery charges, but the Senate censured him for failing to disclose payments from a grocery chain on his ethics forms. Currently, anyone wishing to view state lawmakers' ethics forms must visit an office in Annapolis, provide an ID that includes a home address, and sign a form showing which lawmakers' records are to be inspected.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake says she will neither sign nor veto legislation to loosen conflict-of-interest restrictions that have sometimes prevented City Council members from voting on bills. The legislation - sought by Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young - has been approved by the council, and it is expected to become law without the mayor's signature. The bill, sponsored by Young, would lift some ethics restrictions to allow him to vote on matters involving city agencies where his family members work.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
Gov.Martin O'Malley will sign bills doing everything from raising income taxes to banning arsenic from chicken feed Tuesday as he closes out the business of the 90-day General Assembly session and the special session that followed it. Joined by House Speaker Michael E. Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, O'Malley will hold a marathon ceremony during which he will sign hundreds of bills into law. They include the two budget-related measures...
NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 22, 2012
ON THE SITE... McDonough calls for 'solutions summit' on downtown crime :  Del. Patrick L. McDonough, a Republican from Harford and Baltimore counties,  is now calling on the mayor to resign unless she holds a "solutions summit" on mobs of black teens in the Inner Harbor. Two injured, one killed in Baltimore violence : Police found a 58-year-old man dead of a gunshot wound to the head  in the Harlem Park neighborhood of West Baltimore, at about 12:15 a.m. O'Malley to sign tax hike, arsenic ban, ethics bill :  Governor, legislative leaders will hold a marathon ceremony during which O'Malley will sign hundreds of bills into law. Arundel council commends police, not chief, for drop in crime :  The council passed the resolution only after approving an amendment specifically removing Police Chief James E. Teare Sr.'s name from the language.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2011
Baltimore County Council members on Monday delayed introducing a wide-ranging ethics bill proposed by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, saying they didn't have time to review the lengthy legislation. Council members now plan to introduce the bill at a legislative session planned for Nov. 21, rather than Monday as scheduled. The measure could then be voted on in December. Among other things, the bill would add teeth to a county charter rule against council members holding state jobs; prohibit county employees from taking gifts from people who do business with the county; and require the financial disclosure forms of elected officials to be posted online beginning in May 2012.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2010
Baltimore County Councilman Ken Oliver is seeking to amend an ethics bill that some believe targets a well-known lobbyist and the president of the firefighters union. The current ethics law bars people who have been convicted of certain crimes — bribery, fraud, embezzlement, theft and forgery, among others — from doing business with the county or representing county employees. Oliver's amendment would require the bill to be "prospective," applying only to those convicted of crimes after Sept.
NEWS
April 3, 1995
You take your car to your mechanic and ask for an engine overhaul. Later you find that the mechanic ignored the engine and instead put on a whole new set of tires that weren't needed. Not only that, he put the tires on wrong!This is something like the approach taken by state legislators from Howard County as they've tried to lessen the conflicts of interest between the local Zoning Board and individuals testifying in zoning cases.For the fourth year in a row, state Sen. Martin G. Madden has sponsored or co-sponsored an "ethics bill" that would require applicants for zoning changes to disclose their financial contributions to County Council members, who also happen to sit as the Zoning Board in Howard County.
NEWS
December 5, 1994
Howard County elected officials continue their ludicrous stance that the County Council should continue to serve concurrently as the local Zoning Board. For the fourth year in a row, Sen.-elect Martin G. Madden and Del. John S. Morgan have proposed an "ethics bill" that would require applicants for zoning changes to disclose contributions to council members. This year's model would also demand that contributions to the county executive be revealed.The new version of the bill, like its predecessors, is bad legislation.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Sun Staff Writer | October 16, 1994
The County Council Tuesday unanimously approved the ethics bill for county employees, volunteer board members and lobbyists that outgoing President Jeffrey D. Wilson had created as his "legacy" to county government.Significant compromises on the 38-page bill, which was approved with 32 amendments attached, had been worked out in an earlier meeting between Mr. Wilson and County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann."Gratification can't be expressed too often," the council president said in voting for the bill.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Sun Staff Writer | April 8, 1994
He made it a campaign pledge during his first run for state office in 1990, and now Del. Martin G. Madden, R-13B, says he's finally delivered a law to help calm residents' concerns that zoning decisions are being unduly influenced by developers' money.The legislation, which requires applicants for zoning changes to disclose contributions of $500 or more over a four-year period to Howard County Council members -- who serve as the zoning board -- has passed the House and Senate. An amendment must be approved before the bill can be sent to the governor for his signature by the close of the General Assembly session Monday night.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
Gov.Martin O'Malley will sign bills doing everything from raising income taxes to banning arsenic from chicken feed Tuesday as he closes out the business of the 90-day General Assembly session and the special session that followed it. Joined by House Speaker Michael E. Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, O'Malley will hold a marathon ceremony during which he will sign hundreds of bills into law. They include the two budget-related measures...
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | March 22, 2012
Maryland's Senate gave preliminary approval Thursday to legislation that would require the state to put lawmakers' ethics forms online.  The legislation was supported by watchdog group Common Cause in the wake of a federal corruption trial that starred Sen. Ulysses S. Currie, a Prince George's County Democrat. Currie was found not guilty of bribery charges, but the Senate censured him for failing to disclose payments from a grocery chain on his ethics forms. Currently, anyone wishing to view state lawmakers' ethics forms must visit an office in Annapolis, provide an ID that includes a home address, and sign a form showing which lawmakers' records are to be inspected.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2011
Baltimore County Council members unanimously passed wide-ranging ethics reform legislation Monday, but not before scaling back parts of the measure. A series of amendments sponsored by all seven council members weakened parts of the original bill proposed by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz. Those sections touched on when officials can accept gifts and what defines a conflict of interest for council members. The new rules still will require elected officials' financial disclosure forms to be posted online starting in May 2012, prohibit former employees from lobbying on issues they worked on and strengthen a county charter rule against council members holding state jobs.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2011
Baltimore County Council members on Monday delayed introducing a wide-ranging ethics bill proposed by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, saying they didn't have time to review the lengthy legislation. Council members now plan to introduce the bill at a legislative session planned for Nov. 21, rather than Monday as scheduled. The measure could then be voted on in December. Among other things, the bill would add teeth to a county charter rule against council members holding state jobs; prohibit county employees from taking gifts from people who do business with the county; and require the financial disclosure forms of elected officials to be posted online beginning in May 2012.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2011
After several hearings and hours of public testimony, the Howard County Council tabled a resolution Monday that would weaken the county's ability to seize private property. Instead, the measure to limit the county's ability to use eminent domain will go before the charter review commission, the 15-member panel that is required to review the county's charter every eight years. The commission will make recommendations to the council. Councilman Greg Fox introduced the resolution in response to a continuing dispute in Clarksville, where several business owners feared the county would use eminent domain to build a road parallel to Route 108 to create access for a county-owned property.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2010
The Baltimore County Council approved borrowing more than $19 million to help build the long-stalled Owings Mills Town Center project, a major step forward in revitalizing the struggling commercial zone. The measure passed on a 6-0 vote, with Republican T. Bryan McIntire abstaining. The project will house branches of the Community College of Baltimore County and public library. The library and two-year college, housed in an estimated 60,000-square-foot building, will become part of the larger project along the Interstate 795 and Reisterstown Road corridors.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2010
Baltimore County Councilman Ken Oliver is seeking to amend an ethics bill that some believe targets a well-known lobbyist and the president of the firefighters union. The current ethics law bars people who have been convicted of certain crimes — bribery, fraud, embezzlement, theft and forgery, among others — from doing business with the county or representing county employees. Oliver's amendment would require the bill to be "prospective," applying only to those convicted of crimes after Sept.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.